The Paducah Post (Paducah, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 29, 1946 Page: 2 of 12

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: The Paducah Area Newspaper Collection and was provided to The Portal to Texas History by the Bicentennial City County Library.

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THE PADUCAH POST THURSDAY AUGUST 29, 1946
The PADUCAH POST
Serving Cottle County for 40 years____
Published Every Thursday by
The Post Publishing Co.
Corner of Eighth and Richards Streets_
E. A. CARLOCK and ALFRED HINDS ................ Publishers
ALFRED HINDS ............................................... Editor
HOWARD POWELL ........................................ Mechanical Supt.
DORA BANISTER ........................................ Linotype Operator
Entered as second class matter at the postoffice at Paducah,
Texas, under the Act of March 30, 1879. _
Subscription Rates __
Otoe Year ................................-............................................‘2r
Three Months .......................................................................... ‘°c
The Paducah Post is an Independent Democratic Newspaper,
publishing the news impartially and supporting what it believes
tof fee right regardless of party politics._
Member of the Panhandle and Texas
Press Associations_
MEMBER 1946
MlBIl TEXAS _
M press
_ASSOCIATION_
CLOSE THE DOOR
In this day and age, even with all the safety devises for
fire prevention, there remains the necessity for quick thinking
and acting by individuals whqn fire strikes.
Many articles have been written on the importance of
knowing when not to open a door when fire threatens a build-
ing. A little advance thought or. training on this subject can
save an individual’s life. If you awaken from a sleep and smell
smoke, your first move should not be to jerk open the bedroom
door, instead put your hand on the door panel. If the wood is
hot it means that the hall beyond is charged with lethal heat
and gas that can kill almost instantly, and that the stairway
is probably cut off from use. Escape should be made by a win-
dow if possible, or at least call for help from a window. With
a closed door between you and the fire you have every chance
of surviving until rescue comes.
Next to the importance of not opening a door is the impor-
tance of closing doors during a fire. When a person is eescaping
from a room where a fire is raging, if he doesn’t shut the door
the fire is liable to overtake him before he can make' an ef-
fective retreat—this is true particularly when time is needed
to rescue another party.
Lethal gas ranging from 800 to 1,000 degrees in tempera-
ture can quickly flood a building. The two recent hotel fires
graphically illustrated the truth of these words.
Firemen agree that thousands of persons would still be
alive if they had known and practiced the simple technique in
opening or closing doors during a fire.
RADIOS - NEW and USED
Record Players — Single & Automatic
ANTENNAS
RADIO
FLASHLIGHT
LANTERN
ELECTRIC FENCE
HOME & AUTO
EARL COMBS RADIO SHOP
COTTLE HOTEL BLDG.
PHONE 204
JAMES W. BULLOCK
POST NO. 216
MEETS THE FIRST AND THIRD TUES-
DAY NIGHTS OF EACH MONTH
IN SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL
World War I and II Buddies urged to attend regularly
BRYAN C. HANDLEY, Commander, DICK REED, Adj.
GENERAL INSURANCE
Fire, Automobile, & Windstorm
Bonds & Loans
LET US FINANCE & INSURE
YOUR NEW AUTOMOBILE
T. L. WILKINS AGENCY
Box 816 Monroe Dunn Phone 108
Office in Room No. 3 over First National Bank Building.
Gasoline Driven
Portable Electric
Welder
We build what you need in
farm equipment to your speci-
fications. Have us build any-
thing you want. Our prices are
reasonable and our finished
products will give satisfactory
performance.
Blacksmith Work Acetylene and
Electric Welding
NO JOB TO BIG OR TO FAR AWAY FOR US TO DO.
MAJORS BLACKSMITH and
WELDING SHOP
On Crowell Highway in East Paducah
Day Phone 332 Nite Phone 40M
WASHINGTON
NEWSLETTER
(GENE WORLEY)
(continued from last week)
The Philippine Islands are also
of strategic importance to us in
our perimeter of defense and in
the basic legislation the United
States retained the right to keep
and develop them as long as we
so desired. The population of the
Philippines is approximately 18
iftillion, people which represents
nearly all classes or castes. Man-
uel Roxas was recently elected
by an overwhelming majority to
be the first President of the
Philippines. There is a question
in my mind, however, as to whe-
ther the Philippines were actually
ready for or could discharge the
obligation which their indepen-
dence carried. Their economy
was of course ruined by the Jap-
anese and they seemed groggy
from the brutality of the Jap
occupation. However, President
Roxas assured us that in spite of
these handicaps they could and
would do everything within their
power to convince the world they
could stand on their feet and
take their place in the world of
nations. They depend in large
measure upon the export of su-
gar but most of the sugar mills
were destroyed by the enemy
and Mr. Roxas said they needed
at least 150 thousand tons of
ammonium sulphate as fertilizer
but had been able to secure but
15 tons as yet from the United
States.
Prices in the Philippines are
high, as they seem to be all over
the world. As you can imagine,
there is not very much to buy
and in such a chaotic • economy
prices naturally rise.
The Independence Day cere-
mony itself was very impressive.
Because of the extreme midday
heat in the Philippines, most af-
fairs are scheduled -for early
morning, consequently we were
on hand at 8 o’clock the next
morning, July 4. Among the
speakers was Senator Tydings of
Maryland, Commissioner McNutt,
President Roxas and General
Douglas MacArthur, who occupies
a very high place in the hearts
of the Filipinos. The square was
packed and jammed with Filipino
people and despite another rain
during the middle of the cere-
mony, the Philippines became a
living Republic that morning.
There was' a State Dinner that
night which was attended by am-
bassadors and other dignitaries
from Russia, England, France
and .nearly all other countries.
The next day we saw at first
hand Bataan, ruined Corregidor,
Subic Bay, and other U. S. in-
stallatio.ns which gave mute testi-
mony to the bloody battles which
were fought there.
The Islands themselves are
most impressive in their tropical
productivity but they could do
with the know-how which the
American farmer could supply
Incidentally, Mr. Roxas also said
they welcomed with ope,n arms
any and all Americans who could
provide such know-how and in-
dustry.
From the Philippines, we left
for Shanghai — a distance of
1250 miles, arriving there late
in the afternoon, flying along
the edge of Formosa which had
been in Japanese hands during
the occupation. In order to get
a better look at the rice paddies
and crops and people living along
this shore, we dropped to a,n alti-
tude of 200 or 250 feet. While
airplanes are not exactly a novel-
ty out there, one native who saw
the giant four-engine plane skim-
ming over his head, threw up his
hands in consternation and be-
gan running toward us and then
turned and started the other way.
When we passed over him he was
still running. Although we dipped
one wing in friendly salute he
must have thought it was the
enemy coming back.
* * *
Next week: China.
Dr. and Mrs. W. T. Payne and
Ted have returned from a vaca-
tion in various parts of Colorado.
A daughter Mrs. Harry Erb, re-
turned for an extended visit with
her parents.
KILL RED ANTS! You can easily
rid your premises of Red Ant Beds
with Durham's Extermo Ant
Balls at a cost of less than 5c per
den. Six Balls 30c and 12 Balls 50c
at your druggist or at
BIGHAM DRUG. CO.
Season Tickets
For Texas Tech
Now On Sale
Season tickets for the Texas
Tech home football games this
fall have gone on sale at the ath-
letic department office and in-
dications are the largest crowd
in history will be on hand for the
five games.
Center sections in the stands
will be taken by season ticket
holders, Morley Jennings, ath-
letic director, stated. Demand is
almost double that of last year.
Tech will play five home
games: Sept. 21, West Texas
State; Oct. 19, Baylor (Home-
coming) ; Oct. 26, Denver Uni-
versity; Nov. 9, New Mexico; and
Nov. 16, Oklahoma A. and M.
Only the West Texas game will
be at night.
Mr. Jennings is urging all
fans to make reservations for
the season or individual games
at once if good seats are desired.
Elmer Tqrbox, Lubbock, pres-
ident of the Texas Tech Ex-Stu-
dent association, is. urging all
former Techsans to reserve seats
for the Homecoming game with
Baylor to write Mr. Jennings im-
mediately so proper seating ar-
rangements may be made.
“Exes who don’t make reser-
vations now may find themselyes
standing or in temporary seats
behind goal posts,” he said.
Homecoming this year will be
the biggest in history. We ex-
pect exes to be on hand from all
over the Southwest—and we
want them to have good seats.
But if reservations are not made
now, many of them will be sitting
in places where they may not be
able to see the game to advan-
tage.”
Less Hogs But
More Money
In January of 1867 there were
298,000 more hogs in Texas than
there are today.
That sounds like a blow to
Texas swine production, but a
comparison of values shows that
prices and quality are more im-
portant than mere quantity in
production. Even though there
are almost 3,000 less hogs in the
state now than in 1867, today’s
005.000, as compared with the
value of Texas hogs is set at $34,-
1867 value which was only $4,-
202.000.
These figures were released
from the Agricultural Economics
Service Center which has been
recently set up at the Texas A.
and M. College Extension Service.
Figures f^pm the service cen-
ter are reminders of what did
MODERN REFRIGERATION
AIDS ECONOMICAL BUYING
Because of the accurate low
temperatures maintained In mo-
dem refrigerators it has become
possible not only to eliminate
food loss by spoilage but also to
buy economically. Reports from
homes where Westinghouse re-
frigerators have been tested show
that an average of $1.75 per
week is saved by buying in quan-
tity and by watching for and
taking advantage of food sales.
and can happen to values of
farm and ranch products. For in-
stance, hogs in 1919 were aver-
aging $18.60, but were at a $2.-
59 average in 1933.
For an over-all view of what
the “depression days” did to
agriculture in this state, the ser-
vice center has figures showing
that it took Texas farmers 13
years to again reach a cash in-
come of 20 million dollars after
seeing it fall below that figure
in 1929.
J. D. BELL
LAWYER
First National Bank Building
KNIGHTS
OF
PYTHIAS
No. 392
Regular Meeting every Monday
Night at 8:00 o'clock.
Attendance encourages coop-
eration, cooperation builds a
better Lodge. Every Member
Attend.
Dr. Raymond Hander
Veterinarian
Office City Hall Phone 976
Childress, Texas,
WHEN IN NEED OF
REPAIRS ON YOUR
• Car
• Truck
• Tractor
Call or see
TYE’S GARAGE
Public Accountant
Systems Installed
And Maintained
Tax Consultant
Income Taxes
Audits
GENERAL INSURANCE
AFTON WILLINGHAM
PADUCAH, TEXAS
9 HALL BLDG. PHONE 387
POST WANT ADS GET RESULTS
V ✓
THERE’S EYING
HORSEPOWER
At the sign of the Flying Red Horse in
the new
Mobilgas
at Marrs and Brown Service Station just across the
street west of Paducah Motor Co.
It is here that you get the best lubrication with the
famous Magnolia oils and greases, your car washed and
a general all-round service that will keep your car on the
road.
Our equipment for vulcan-
izing car, truck or tractor
casings is complete. Why
not get all the service pos-
sible out of them? If your
tire is not too far gone we
can put many more miles
in it.
Let Us Vulcan-
ize Your Tires.
MAGNOLIA SERVICE STATION
Marrs & Brown
GAS, LUBRICATION, OIL CHANGE, CAR WASH,
TIRE VULCANIZING and FRIENDLY SERVICE.
TRY CONOCO
KEROSENE
This Kerosene is especially
recommended to he used for
Electrolux Refrigeration.
ONLY
8c Per Gallon
J. F. POWELL
AGENT
CONTINENTAL OIL CO.
His Farm Fields Are Factories
TJ. S. FARMERS have made our fields
into factories.
¥e live better than people in other coun-
tries because our farmers get more out of the
soil
The steel industry takes pride in the way
it has helped bring about this improvement in
farm practice. Tools of steel—from the plow-?
share to the giant combine—have multiplied
in number and increased vastly in quality;
Fifty years ago the typical farm in America
used about 3 tons of steel. Today the figure
is nearer 173^ tons.
That is a measure of the modernization of
agriculture and an indication of the inter-
dependence of steel and farming.
We no longer have separate "farm produc-
tion problems” or "industrial production prob -
lems.” We have but one set of problems for
everybody;
If strikes, for instance, restrict the sup-*
ply of farm implements and supplies through
work stoppages, or make their cost prohibitive*
America is out of gear.
v
Anything which tends in this direction is
bad for the farmer—and finally for everybody;
Farmers know it. Everybody else should
know it; V
★ * *
Steel mills need all the scrap iron and steel
they can get. The shortage is serious. Farmers
can get extra dollars and help increase steel
output by sending worn-out machinery, etc., on
its way to the furnaces. American Iron and
Steel Institute, 350 Fifth Avenue. New
York 1, N. Y;
The Institute has printed a booklet STEEL SERVES THE FARMER.
Write for a copy and it will be sent gladly.,
t

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Hinds, Alfred. The Paducah Post (Paducah, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 29, 1946, newspaper, August 29, 1946; Paducah, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth1014525/m1/2/ocr/: accessed August 12, 2020), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Bicentennial City County Library.

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