The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 90, July 1986 - April, 1987 Page: 207

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Book Reviews

Audubon's striking appearance and buckskin attire. The popular press
encouraged this sense of mystery and adventure.
From the time of Sir John Hawkins's ill-fated expedition (1567)
through to the 188os, Texas acted as a magnet for a wide variety of En-
glish (and Welsh) immigrants, who played pivotal roles in the incipient
political, military, and social history of the Republic and young state.
Most Englishmen and women came in families or small groups and
easily assimilated the manners, dress, and speech patterns of their
Texas cousins.
Artfully, Cutrer offers snippets from the nineteenth-century cadre of
promoters and popularizers (William Kennedy, Arthur Ikin, William
Bollaert), including the unusual, un-English mystic Amelia Barr. His
most exciting chapters focus on English "cowboys," many of whom
traveled to West Texas as the second sons of Old Country gentry, al-
though many arrived in quest of excitement and adventure. Some of
these young men broke horses and trailed cattle, establishing dynasties.
Others preferred the more detached role of manager or foreman.
Much of the Panhandle received contingents of English settlers intent
on overseeing company or family investments in cattle.
This is an attractively written and engaging account of the Texas ex-
periences of English immigrants. The "gentry" tend to receive atten-
tion because many proved anachronisms (often adapting quickly) on
the rough rangelands. Cutrer has written an invaluable contribution to
the Institute of Texan Cultures' series on national groups. He must be
congratulated for providing a comprehensive nine-page bibliography
and for the handsome series of old photographs, sketches, and engrav-
ings that add a real visual feast to the text.
University of Texas, Austin ROBIN DOUGHTY
Restoring Texas: Raiford Stripling's Life and Architecture. By Michael
McCullar. (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1985.
Pp. xiv+ 161. Foreword, acknowledgments, photographs, illustra-
tions, color plates, notes on sources, appendix, bibliography, in-
dex. $19.95.)
Raiford Stripling is widely known for his pioneering work in the field
of historic restoration in Texas. During the 193os and subsequent dec-
ades, Raiford-as he is known by his associates-created through his
work a public awareness of our Texas architectural heritage. He exe-
cuted the reconstruction of Fort Parker, an 1834 private stronghold
near Mexia, and, with Charles P. Vosper, received the commission to re-

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 90, July 1986 - April, 1987, periodical, 1986/1987; Austin, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117152/m1/245/ocr/: accessed August 28, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State Historical Association.