Oral History Interview with Charles H. Tucker, April 18, 2017

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The National Museum of the Pacific War presents an oral interview with Charles H. Tucker from Orange, California. He discusses volunteering for the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1943 and going to basic training in Miami Beach, Florida, then going to Aircraft Armament School in Buckley Field, Colorado, and finally air gunnery school in Fort Myers, Florida. In air gunnery school, Mr. Tucker learned to shoot in B-17 by shooting into the Gulf of Mexico. After gunnery school he was sent to the B-25 crew training at Columbia, South Carolina for 5 months. After Mr. Tucker completed his training, he … continued below

Physical Description

37 p.

Creation Information

Tucker, Charles H. April 18, 2017.

Context

This text is part of the collection entitled: National Museum of the Pacific War Oral History Collection and was provided by the National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this text can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this text or its content.

Interviewee

Interviewer

Transcriber

Publisher

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this text as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this text useful in their work.

Provided By

National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Established in 1967, the Museum honors the 8 million Americans who served in WWII in the Pacific Theater by sharing their stories with the world. Located in Fredericksburg in the restored Nimitz "Steamboat" Hotel, the Museum partners with the Texas Historical Commission to preserve the historical resources of the era.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this text. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Portal.

Description

The National Museum of the Pacific War presents an oral interview with Charles H. Tucker from Orange, California. He discusses volunteering for the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1943 and going to basic training in Miami Beach, Florida, then going to Aircraft Armament School in Buckley Field, Colorado, and finally air gunnery school in Fort Myers, Florida. In air gunnery school, Mr. Tucker learned to shoot in B-17 by shooting into the Gulf of Mexico. After gunnery school he was sent to the B-25 crew training at Columbia, South Carolina for 5 months. After Mr. Tucker completed his training, he was transferred to Dacca to a B-25 base and joined the 10th Air Force, the 12th Bomb Group. When he arrived his crew pilots were reassigned, and Mr. Tucker was not able to fly much until he was assigned to a regular crew again. Mr. Tucker was put in the 729th bomb squadron tasked with supporting the British 14th Army against the Japanese forces in Burma. The campaign he was involved in ended in May 1945 with the capture of Rangoon, the main city of Burma and Mr. tucker was in one of the squadron planes that flew over the celebration parade after the victory. When the war ended, Mr. Tucker was training at Madeaiganji airfield in India and celebrated by drinking, only to get frightened when his fellow servicemen started drunkenly shooting into the air. Mr. Tucker left on a ship headed for New York on October 1, 1945, and reached there on October 31 and was granted 45 days of leave. After his leave, Mr. Tucker reported to San Antonio, Texas, and was discharged December 22, 1945. When the Korean War started, he volunteered to be a pilot but was denied because of his vison, so instead Mr. Tucker became a navigator in February of 1951. After he completed combat crew flight training, he was assigned to the 452nd Bomb Group tasked with night patrols over the North Korean border. Mr. Tucker left the Airforce in 1954 but stayed in the Air Force Reserve until July 1984, at the end of his service he was a Lieutenant Colonel with the Pacific Campaign medal with Battle star, the American Service ribbon and the Victory Medal. Mr. Tucker's Battle star was awarded for the Central Burma Campaign he was a part of.

Physical Description

37 p.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this text in the Portal or other systems.

Relationships

Collections

This text is part of the following collections of related materials.

National Museum of the Pacific War Oral History Collection

This oral history collection depicts an instrumental era in American history. In these transcripts of interviews with World War II veterans are personal experiences with the war, from the Doolittle Raid and D-Day to the Battle for Bataan.

National Museum of the Pacific War Digital Archive

The Digital Archive presents digitized collections from the Center for Pacific War Studies collections at the National Museum of the Pacific War. Collections and material are continuously being added and represent only a small portion of the archives' physical holdings.

Related Items

Oral History Interview with Charles H. Tucker, April 18, 2017 (Sound)

Oral History Interview with Charles H. Tucker, April 18, 2017

The National Museum of the Pacific War presents an oral interview with Charles H. Tucker from Orange, California. He discusses volunteering for the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1943 and going to basic training in Miami Beach, Florida, then going to Aircraft Armament School in Buckley Field, Colorado, and finally air gunnery school in Fort Myers, Florida. In air gunnery school, Mr. Tucker learned to shoot in B-17 by shooting into the Gulf of Mexico. After gunnery school he was sent to the B-25 crew training at Columbia, South Carolina for 5 months. After Mr. Tucker completed his training, he was transferred to Dacca to a B-25 base and joined the 10th Air Force, the 12th Bomb Group. When he arrived his crew pilots were reassigned, and Mr. Tucker was not able to fly much until he was assigned to a regular crew again. Mr. Tucker was put in the 729th bomb squadron tasked with supporting the British 14th Army against the Japanese forces in Burma. The campaign he was involved in ended in May 1945 with the capture of Rangoon, the main city of Burma and Mr. tucker was in one of the squadron planes that flew over the celebration parade after the victory. When the war ended, Mr. Tucker was training at Madeaiganji airfield in India and celebrated by drinking, only to get frightened when his fellow servicemen started drunkenly shooting into the air. Mr. Tucker left on a ship headed for New York on October 1, 1945, and reached there on October 31 and was granted 45 days of leave. After his leave, Mr. Tucker reported to San Antonio, Texas, and was discharged December 22, 1945. When the Korean War started, he volunteered to be a pilot but was denied because of his vison, so instead Mr. Tucker became a navigator in February of 1951. After he completed combat crew flight training, he was assigned to the 452nd Bomb Group tasked with night patrols over the North Korean border. Mr. Tucker left the Airforce in 1954 but stayed in the Air Force Reserve until July 1984, at the end of his service he was a Lieutenant Colonel with the Pacific Campaign medal with Battle star, the American Service ribbon and the Victory Medal. Mr. Tucker's Battle star was awarded for the Central Burma Campaign he was a part of.

Oral History Interview with Charles H. Tucker, April 18, 2017, ark:/67531/metapth1613177

What responsibilities do I have when using this text?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this text.

Creation Date

  • April 18, 2017

Covered Time Period

Coverage Date

Added to The Portal to Texas History

  • Oct. 20, 2023, 1:39 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Jan. 12, 2024, 12:55 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this text last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 4
Total Uses: 9

Where

Geographical information about where this text originated or about its content.

Map Information

  • map marker Place Name coordinates. (May be approximate.)
  • Repositioning map may be required for optimal printing.

Mapped Locations

Interact With This Text

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Tucker, Charles H. Oral History Interview with Charles H. Tucker, April 18, 2017, text, April 18, 2017; Fredericksburg, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth1613155/: accessed March 2, 2024), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation.

Back to Top of Screen