Speech by Judge Learned Hand "Spirit of Liberty"

Description

Document with the most famous lines from Judge Learned Hand's speech from the "I Am An American Day" event which was held in New York City's Central Park on May 21, 1944. Hand spoke about the spirit of liberty and how it is found in our hearts, not in a physical location or within any documents. He became very well known for this speech and specifically this passage. The text is printed in black ink on cream colored paper. The text is framed by a thin, black decorative border.

Physical Description

1 document : b&w ; 15.2 x 20.3 cm.

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. 1944/1961.

Context

This text is part of the collection entitled: Rescuing Texas History, 2011 and was provided by Sam Rayburn House Museum to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 3854 times , with 20 in the last month . More information about this text can be viewed below.

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  • Judge Learned Hand Judge Learned Hand spoke these words during a speech given to 1.5 million people in New York City's Central Park during the "I Am an American Day" event in which legalized immigrants became U.S. citizens. Judge Hand spoke about the spirit of liberty.

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Provided By

Sam Rayburn House Museum

The Sam Rayburn House Museum provides photographs and artwork from the Rayburn family's personal collection. Its mission centers on increasing local, regional and national awareness of Sam Rayburn's life and career as a United States Congressman through the preservation and interpretation of the historic site.

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Description

Document with the most famous lines from Judge Learned Hand's speech from the "I Am An American Day" event which was held in New York City's Central Park on May 21, 1944. Hand spoke about the spirit of liberty and how it is found in our hearts, not in a physical location or within any documents. He became very well known for this speech and specifically this passage. The text is printed in black ink on cream colored paper. The text is framed by a thin, black decorative border.

Physical Description

1 document : b&w ; 15.2 x 20.3 cm.

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Collections

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Rescuing Texas History, 2011

The 2011 edition of Rescuing Texas History includes photographs, postcards, legal documents, and more. These materials reflect generations of past Texans who contributed to the history and culture of the state.

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Creation Date

  • 1944/1961

Added to The The Portal to Texas History

  • Sept. 3, 2011, 12:03 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Feb. 23, 2012, 6:54 p.m.

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Yesterday: 1
Past 30 days: 20
Total Uses: 3,854

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Speech by Judge Learned Hand "Spirit of Liberty", text, 1944/1961; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth183520/: accessed July 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Sam Rayburn House Museum.