"Time You Were Home, Papa" Print

Description

Color print depicting a small child, standing on a chair speaking into a phone saying, "HELLO PAPA!" The tagline at the middle of the print reads, "TIME YOU WERE HOME, PAPA." A clock at the top of the print shows that the time is 12:47. The child wears only a cloth diaper and one shoe. He stands on a chair that is pulled up next to a table. The child speaks into a old, candlestick early model phone. The child's clothing or pajamas hang off one corner of the chair he is standing upon. The chair's seat and the top ... continued below

Physical Description

1 art print : col. ; 3 x 8 1/2 inches.

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. 1906.

Context

This postcard is part of the collection entitled: Rescuing Texas History, 2011 and was provided by Sam Rayburn House Museum to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 82 times , with 4 in the last month . More information about this postcard can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this postcard or its content.

Creator

  • We've been unable to identify the creator(s) of this postcard.

Publisher

Audiences

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Provided By

Sam Rayburn House Museum

The Sam Rayburn House Museum provides photographs and artwork from the Rayburn family's personal collection. Its mission centers on increasing local, regional and national awareness of Sam Rayburn's life and career as a United States Congressman through the preservation and interpretation of the historic site.

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What

Descriptive information to help identify this postcard. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Portal.

Description

Color print depicting a small child, standing on a chair speaking into a phone saying, "HELLO PAPA!" The tagline at the middle of the print reads, "TIME YOU WERE HOME, PAPA." A clock at the top of the print shows that the time is 12:47. The child wears only a cloth diaper and one shoe. He stands on a chair that is pulled up next to a table. The child speaks into a old, candlestick early model phone. The child's clothing or pajamas hang off one corner of the chair he is standing upon. The chair's seat and the top of the table are both green. There are are several books next to the phone on the table.

Physical Description

1 art print : col. ; 3 x 8 1/2 inches.

Subjects

Keyword

NMC Chenhalls

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this postcard in the Portal or other systems.

Collections

This postcard is part of the following collection of related materials.

Rescuing Texas History, 2011

The 2011 edition of Rescuing Texas History includes photographs, postcards, legal documents, and more. These materials reflect generations of past Texans who contributed to the history and culture of the state.

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When

Dates and time periods associated with this postcard.

Creation Date

  • 1906

Added to The The Portal to Texas History

  • Sept. 3, 2011, 12:03 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • June 14, 2012, 10:49 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this postcard last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 4
Total Uses: 82

Where

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Map Information

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  • map marker Automatically generated Publication Place coordinates.
  • Repositioning map may be required for optimal printing.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

"Time You Were Home, Papa" Print, postcard, 1906; New York, NY. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth183547/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Sam Rayburn House Museum.