The Southern Mercury, Texas Farmers' Alliance Advocate. (Dallas, Tex.), Vol. 8, No. 34, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 22, 1889 Page: 3 of 8

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THE FRRM.
Farm Notes.
[Farm Field aud Bteckmau.l
Put tlia best man ou the (tack, even if it
ia the "boy."
Ja tbat your cultivator standing out'i Pat
It under cover.
Didn't you say you were going to puttbe
harvester under covor to-morrow? l>o it
to-diy.
A Washington county, Obi , farmer,
ninety yours old, assist* tbe bands in the
harvest field.
Farmer in tbe 8cbuylklli valley, Penn-
sylvania, have been doing their work by
moonlight to escape tbe midday beat,
x A grain stack In better to be topped out
wltb.slough grata tbau to be drawn in ao
quick that there is a "shoulder" on it where
tbe water can "wet in."
Don't let any big weeda go to seed. To
be sure they don't, burn them before tbey
shell out. If too green to burn well a little
Straw will help thorn.
t
After a shower is a good time to go
through tbe corn field and see if you can
find any strong bl{ weeds tbat were skip-
ped when cultivating. If you find any pull
them out.
The Ur6t car load of new flax seed was
received In this city July 21 from southern
Kansas and graded No. 1. Last year tbe
first uew flax was received July 18 lrom
Kansas and graded No. 1.
Tbe storm of last week showed plainly
that to care lor tbe harvester property it
should bave a canvas cover over it each
night when left in the field. Last Saturday
the weather Indications were "fair weath-
er." Tbe rain descended before an hour
after quitting time and drenched every-
thing.
in building grain stacks it will be eco-
nomical to place some rails,old boards, hay
or atraw ou tbe ground before commencing
tbe stack. In case we have a wet tall or
your threshing Is delayed, there will not be
muddy or rotten butts to go through tbe
machine, or musty grain to go into the bin.
Alter tbe grain is harvested it 1b a num-
ber one plan to clean up the stack yard,
before beginning stacking, draw out all tbe
manure and 11 any old straw is left that can
be used for bedding put tbat in as little
space as possible, mend up the fences and
bave a good ready for stack making by the
time tbe grain is dry enough to draw in.
The Kansas State Fair Association offers
for coflnty displays of farm products four
premiums, $200, $150, $100 and $00, res-
pectively, and every county in the state
should make on exhibit, not merely to com-
pete for these piizes. but to have their own
locality represented. For a display of farm
products by an individual (tbe material
may be gathered up all over tbe county)
th- ee premiums are offered as tollo ws: $75,
950 and $!!*>. This should be an incentive
to the farmers to prepare a good collection
from his county fair and bring or send to
Topeka.
Of the 4,200 kinds ot flowers which grow
In Europe only 420, or ten per cent, are
odoriferous. The commonest flowers are
the white ones, of which there are 1,104
kinds. Less than one-fifth of these are fra-
grant. Of the 051 kinds of yellow flowers
77 are odoriferous; of the 823 red kinds, 84;
of the 5t)i blue kinds, SI; of tbe 808 violet-
blue kinds, 13. Of the 240 kinds with com-
bined colors 28 are fragrant.
J. A. Ells, of JklcLeod county, Minn.,
Writes "that honey sweet corn 1 received
With Farm, Field and Stockman, I planted
Hay 4. July 24 it was large enough for
roasting ears. How is that lot Minneso-
ta?"
When we come to think of it, It is indeed
i curious fact that America has'no national
Bower to which she can point with pride
ind affection, as does Ireland to the Sham-
rock, Scotland to her Thistle, England to
her Rose and sunny France to her Fleur-
de-lis.
9
Kev. W. B. Kacbman, a leading Presby-
terian minister of Chattanooga, states that
an the top of White mountain iu western
North Carolina are three trees of tbe cach-
ion species growing close together, each
being about a foot In diameter and about
ttfteen feet In height. The top of the trees
Is about twenty feet in diameter and per-
fectly fiat, being so completely ínterwoveu
tbat a number of persons can walk on theni
with ease. Twelvó persons can lie down
on tho top of tbe trees without danger ol
falling, indeed, so close are these tops
that holes had to be cut in the middle lor
persons to get on top.
Never allow the fowls to go thirsty.
Above all things keep the hen bouse
elean and well ventilated.
Don't forget that green food Bhould be
fed to fowls when confined.
Save the best birds lor next year's breed-
ing and send the others to market.
11 your hens lay solt-shelled eggs tbey
are probably too fat. Put them to work
icratcblng.
Don't forget to keep your chicks away
rrom tbe bug pen. Hogs have a weakness
for young chicks.
Kcmcmber that cockerels as well as pul-
lets aie "spring chickens." Next spring
they wiy be "old roosters," worth about
half as much in market as hens.
Young poultry should not be fed with
the older ones. It will always pay to keep
i coop and provide a board or shallow
trough in order to economize feed.
When a cow becomes troublesome, tries
to kick over tbe pail, won't give down her
milk, and so on, there Is a cause lor it, and
tbe cause will vory olten be found outside
the cow—she bas not been properly treated
and she resenis it.
The Atlanta Constitution says that tbe
hulls of cotton seed of the cotton slates ot
the soath will produce uioie beet, buttet,
pillk and cheese, inote wool and mutton,
than all the clover and blue grass ot Ten-
nessee, Kentucky and Ohio.
In passing through the country after tbe
severe storm ot last week no one could
help being impressed with tbe Importance
of thorough work when shocking grain.
Tbe difference in tbe way tbe shocks stood
after tbe storm, was very marked, some of
them did not stand stall, others were more
or less down. In soma fields 'the shooks
stood as stralghat ae before the surra, these
would soon dry out as the id* and wind
could get through them. Tnose that we re
badly down would heve to bo retboeteU
. •• ' is
Is doubtful It they would dry out Wore
moulding or sprouting. Of course where
there is high wind, well made shook are
blown over as well as trees and solid built
houses. We are referring to hard rains
tbat are accompanied by some wind. Use
care In shocking grain and you will find
that it pays.
Tbe value of the cotton exported during
tbe fiscal year endiog July 1, 1839, was
9-30,S0$,100.
Celery is not only very healthful for man,
but for beasts also. So dou't waste the
leaves and root trimmings.
The American raven, which naturalists
thought exiinot, Is still found In Columbia,
and etullivan counties, Pennsylvania.
A gentleman of Pomona, Cal., says that
only five days bave passed slnoo March
1888, that he has not had tresh strawberries
on his table.
It Is said that tbe life of rose plants
greatly varies. Soineofihe hardiest kind
will bloom for thirty yea , while others
die oil' after several seasons.
The black aphis, or black fly, is often
quite troublesome to Cbryanstbemums,
but can be conquered by persistent appli-
cation of Dalmatian powder with the bel-
lows.
The nstlonal flower question bas become
a regular war of tbe poples. Golden rod.
sunflower, magnolia, violet, arbutus, maze
and many others bave their partisans.
Prizes for 1880, offered by the Massachu-
setts Horticultural Society, amount to $(>,-
000— $3.000 for planta and flowers, $1,700
for vegetable , $300 for gardens and groen-
houses.
E. S. Carman ol the Rural New Yorker
says that for fifteen years be bas planted
nil tbe new strawberries he could hear of,
and during these years be has raised many
new seedlings, "not one or which has
shown that it was worthy or introduction."
The Country Gentleman says the prac-
tice of "hilling" potatoes during cultiva-
tion and growth is almost universal, and In
most instances is positively detrimental to
productiveness, yet it is nearly Impossible
to convince tbe farmers of this fact.
A prominent grower states tbat. taking
everything into consideration, tbe best two
roses from last year's long list ol' new va-
rieties arc Mrs. John Latng, a Hybrid Rem-
ontant, and tbe Hybrid Tea Meteor. The
lutter was pushed, perhaps the least of any.
and has gone to the front on its merits.
One of tbe greatest drawbacks in dairy
work Is tbe dilliculty in obtaining honest,
ialthful help.
The only pure, native l(lsh cow is the
Kerry. A small, handsome cow, yielding
a large quantity or nice milk, even under
adverse circumstances.
Almost anybody can milk a cow, but
there are lew who can do it properly, it
Is an art, and the man who can practice It
is worih more to the dairyman than any
other beip.
Scarcely any two cows are exactly alike
in disposition and in tbe character and
naturo ot their teats and udder, and the
good milker will study to know his cow in
order that bo may know how to treat her.
THK SO UTHJEMJr Mmi
DALLAS, TEXAS, A
• ¿:t rajhftÉiÉfríi'11''' ''(• -
MJm
Cholera la IXichiKan.
Dr. F. D. Larke, or Rogers City, Michi-
gan, says the epidemic of last year in
l'resquc Isle county, in which so many
persons lost their lives, was choleric dys-
entery instead ol' cholera, as first reported.
He used Chamberlain's Colic Chotera and
Diarrhoea Remedy, aud says it succeeded
where all other remedies failed. Not a sin-
gle case was lost where It was used. This
Remedy is the most reliable and most suc-
cessful medicine known for colic, cholera
morbus, dysentery, diarrhoea and bloody
llux. 25 and 50 cent bottles for sale by VV.
H. Howell & Bro., Dallas, Texas.
A swarm of bees took possession of one
of the upper story windows lu the new
bank building at Ooldtbwalte; the owner
of ihe building taking it as an- omen ol
good luck has let tbem remain.
See the card ot the Dallas Cooperage Co.
elsewhere In this Issue.
Parties having lost stock in the last
twelve or eighteen months would do well
to send the P. and D. Association a descrip-
tion or them, as tbey have hundreds ol
tbem located, waiting owners. Agents
wanted for tho C brand. Apply to P. and
D. Association. Dallas, Texas.
Farmers.
It will pay you to call at 1201, corner of
Pearl and Elm street, Dallas. W. I).
Scherer accords a hearty welcome to one
and all, and will sell you anything needed
in tbe household In new or second hand
goods cheaper than any house In Dallas.
"On Wheels."
A large stock of carriages, buggies, pb:c-
tons, jumpseats, carts, buckboards, and
Studcbaker farm and spring wagon , Just
received at 718 Elm St., Dallas, by John S.
Witwer. Farmers, merchants, and every
body wanting a nice pleasure vehicle, or
larm or spring wagon, should call on Mr
Witwer; his stock is complete and the
best.
Tub stock department ot tbe Exchange
conducted by Bro. W. J. Williams, ol Hen-
rietta, bids fair to do a profitable business,
lie writes tbat be bas alreudy contracted
12,000 head of ones and twos, these cattle
to be gatberod from west, northwest and
southwest from Dallas count). Other con-
tracts will be made for other parts of tbe
state soon. Persons desiring Information
about the sale or stock should address Uro.
Wlllisms at once.
State Agricultural and Mechanical Col-
lege of Texas.
rOUBTBBNTH ANNUAL 8K8SIOK OPSN8
SKl'TKMBEK 11, ltWO.
Ulves a thorough, scientific and prsctlcal
education which prepares ror useful citi-
zenship. Theoretical and practical course
to dairying, stock-breeding, agriculture,
horticulture, surveying, mechanical and
civil engineering, cbemlstry, veterinary
science, drawing, mathematics, English
and modern languages. Special short
courses In agriculture, horticulture, dairy-
ing, carpentering, blacksmlthlng, machin-
ery, cbemlstry, drawing and surveying.
Extensive additions to dormitories and
equipment of departments have been made.
No tuition. All expenses, except books
and clothing, only $140 for entire session.
Writ* for catalogue to
Lotns L. Mclsxis.
Chairman Com. of Faculty,
nCoUfflft lution. Tai
DRILLING
ti.umsmii'WMLai.,,
Catalogue Fro : ST. LOUIS, MO
'OSCOOD'
8. Standard
'SCALES
——- 8Dfeoanuii
Freight Paid. Fully Warranted. 3Tont35
cthor kIwb proportionately lf>w. Acanta well paid. Bond
for ill. cat&loinia. AdUreus 11. W. Juhbmih, Gen'l Afrent.
DaIIab, Sana* JSn¿lnoJ| Bollera, Kill*}, C.lxi*, Belting
srtRE WARRANTEDTHE BEST
BLACKLAND PLOWS
'T«l«
..TSISO
fruWiu.
UMM0TMK
IN THEWORLO
ir you*
DEALER DOES NOT
em Write us omect
PARLIK&OBEWDORFFCQ. DALLA5.TEXA5
Lightning ITcll-Siiikintf Barhlntr/.
Makers or HyilmiHo, Jcttlwr, llevolv
i i'.jr. Artesian. Mtnlutr, Diamond. TooK
. \\ ellH & Pioipi'illiiff. tiuirluw, Boiler*.
"Wind Mill-. I'uruua. oto.. Bold on
. Trial. An BNOYCLOPFDIA of
l.OUOEufravi rr?e. Kail hBt rati tion-
tioii, Do 101 in motion of Miner-
• Will Quality of Writer,
•os Lijht, ümluGoM
Mailed for 15 ut<
"n«Uoolt i!6cti.
The AincrioAU
WhatDoYouWant?
Write us for prices and information
on Buggies, Hacks. Road Carts, Gin
Outfits, Mowers, Rakes,—in fact, all
kinds of machinery.
Enquiries answered promptly. Pur-
chases made and forwarded to all
points. Try us, and save money.
WOODSON & ALLBRITTON,
Dallas, Texas.
euitETTS MAGNOLIA
GIN
tóSSSSSas
The FOREMOST
STANDARD
COTTON
G-IN
OF THE
i WORLD
HIGHEST AWARD SftSR/tHtt
for I.lgli! Draft. Beat Mamnln and Ueneral
Utility, iitt lie World's Cotton CeiiLiMinlai 1C\posi-
tion, New Orleans, over nil competitors. All Into
Improvements -Double Hrusli Helta on large (.1 Ins.
Adjustable Seed Bonilla, etc.. have been added.
Every «ill ncluullv TENTE with COTTON
before shipment. Address lor further particular
CLEAVES & FLETCHER, GAINESVILLE, TEX,
&XNGSLAND & DOUGLAS
MANUFACTURING CO.
ST. LOUIS, MO.
To the Cotton Planters and Ginners of Texas:
Look Into tho merit, of tlie COTTON BLOOM-
LUJUfUS with Self Feeder and Cabinet Condenser,
They Ola Tast. liaXo boauUful «ampio. Cl.an.eed
perfectly, run e sy. Never Cticko or break the roll.
Ana FULLY GUARANTEED and AUK DELIV-
ERED FILED O? FSEIQIIT at any B. R. Station In th.
Kato of Texas. If wo liavo no Ajent near you addrou
H. W. HUBBAtJD, MfcV General Agent,
No. 088 Commerce St., Salla., Tcjum.
P. S. Al«> Enjcine. and Boll.ro, Com and Food
UU1«, DelUnj, iloalc., Wind.Mill , &o.
*%t
I jf
A f<«w year* a o, t
enginrerof marV-l niathr
lmiticttl and nirrh tinral a
tammant , after Ion year*' *-
porieiicp in al! (iliav i, of win
tutU coimtructton an«! wnc.b
livvtd that wind-, nil* eon Id,
l>e bcttnrod. Hetlifrofor®
struct i*d CI dif lot rut fo;
of wind-wheel unil by
over ft'MK) indivnli.nl dyn*"
aniometric tcktf ni.ido on thona f>l who M, propelled by artificial
and therefore uniform wind, nattlcd definitely many ouokliou*
relating to tho |>ropcr pe «1 of u-her!, the beat form, anglo, curv*
REEDER SELF-PACKING
COTTON PRESS
Oiipenieatviih Tramping. Simple, conve-
nient, and worlu to perfection.
Cins, Feeders & Condensers.
ENGINES ANP BOILERS.
Mention thtinaocr. SEITD FOB CATALOGUE
nttiro and umoimt of ; uil surface, tho ruainUm'o of air to rota*
tion, oMructiom in the wheel Mich a« houvy woodim artna,
obstructions before the whftd as in tho Míneles* mill, and num-
erous othor room olstiuso though not lesa important questions.
The Dynamoniotrr uied uiphsui od tho work done by oach wheel to
tho thousandth of a foot-pound, mid, to bo brief, a thorough, ex-
haustive and sctcntiilc investigation was made. This inveitigu-
tion nrovod that tho poivur of tho bent Wiud«wheelo could l <
.huibfed and Tho Aermotor daily demonstrates that it bus been
done. Wo have tor sometime buen sciiUiug cut tho S ft. Aur
motor, guaranteeing it to do inoro work than any lu ft. wooden
wheel made,%nd ttm 13 ft. pumping and gtarod Anrtuotora gom •
unteeing them to do more work that: any 1« ft. wooden witcelu
made, leaving the purchaser \o be judge and haveasvtarati.it)
ro a i vi axTtaa tau i action Our wheel is made wholly of «Ttk'L,
on the tension or bicycle plan, is very light, very strong, very
iurable and will «tsnd great ceulrifugal strain. It makes three
revolutions to ot¡* long, ea«y stroke of the pump, faces up to a
tireath of air and does rffectivu work when other wheels are
•die It regulate perfectly, keep* a uniform speed in tempesta, is
íoiseless, Himplo. Itfht, any, strong as steel can make it and has
nly half the weight of the ordinary combination of wood, putty,
onint and cast tron called a wind-mill Mr. Kdwin Lee Brown,
imminently identified with Chicago a great enterprise and
hantios, had in lu* grounds at Evunston on a 92,0UÜ Tower, one of
he best 12 ft. wooden wheels made It went to pieces. He re-
>ace 1 it by an H ft Steel Aermotor and aaya that the Q ft. Steel
vheel does more work than the 12 ft- wooden one ever did
ur Tiltil) j Tower brings the wh*el down for oiling A child can
•wer it. It saves human lives and doubles the life of the wheel
t'he Aermotor on a Tilting Tower presents loss than half tho tut
.ice to the grasp of the teinper.t than a common tower and whec
lo, and possess** the trim beauty of tho greyhound or thorough
•red. Where an elevated tank is used* the trussed niait is plv
ted to it, thua s iving the expense of a tower. We keep on ham'
l ilting Towers of the following heights—28 88, 60 and 02 feet
i hey are ao nicely framed and marked that anyone can easil.\
, nt together and ei*<d them We also supply Putnpa and Tanks
Knowing that whne one Aermotor is, many more will aoon bi
we are determined to distribute them regardless of cost, lookini;
iO th j future for our profit.
Special,Introductory Offer,-w. win «hip on ap
r roval an 8 ft rumptrig Aermotor and M ft Tilting fower foi
#55, if ordered by a merchant of known responsibility, or, for$f>n
•nth with order, money to be refunded if not wholly satiafoc
'ory. The Aermotor Co., 110 & 112 South
Jefferson Streo*. Chlcaso.
The Panhandle
Machinery and Improvement Co.
Belt tho
Famous U. S. Solid Wheel
w .Mm%. jve
i
-
Si
CO
Wind Hill ever sold in Texai. Long
Htroke, durable. N mill ever before of-
fered lia pi von such satisfaction. Send
for catalogues.
Tbe above Company are Ktnto Ageuta far
thecclebiated Ilallad&y Wind Mills, Salem
Vurnps, Furqubar Engines, Eureka Wind
Mills, etc. llave always on hand a lull line
of Machinery Supplies, Brass Goods, IlelU
lux, ripe, Well Casing, Well Drills, etc.
Contract to furnish entire mill, gin or
waler-tuuk outfits. Oct tbetr prices. If
you need any tiling in machinery Une, you
can save money by so doing.
e% Live agents wautod In every
county In tho state.
Addrf ss the
PANHANDLE MACHINERY & IMPROVEMENT CO.,
ftirt Worth, Tex
*-■- -l~!
Dalla$ ^levator <£o.,
DALLAS,
TEXAS,
THE GEEAT EQUALIZER OF FRIGES!
Your interest is our interest. Store your grain and save 25 cents to 50 cents
per bushel. We offer special inducements for storing grain of all kinds.
One-tinlf (>/,) cent per bushel for first 15 d iyc, or part thereof; one-half (%) ocnt
for second 15 days, or part thereof. Or, one cent per month, and one-half cent
fur receiving and one-half cent for delivering. Hooelpts Issued on clHsslfl«.allons
and weights at the elevator.
Money advanced on receipts at ourrent rate of Interest. Insurance very low. Inlerestof
tho patrons of the elevator will bo strictly guarded, (¿rain t4iored <trllh us commands the
highest price, as wo are In constant communication with all tbe markois of the country. No
ohorge for buying, 60lllng or giving Information. All gi'aln weighed and clatsilled under tbe
supervision ol' Merchants Kxobange, if doslred.
M. COCKRELL, President and Gen'I Manager.
DALLAS, EI. EVA TOR COMPANY,
Dallas, Texas.
STOCK WELL WATERED IS HALF FED.
We Manufacture the Celebrated
I X L
WIND MILL,
14,000
NOW IN USE.
No Chains or Pul• ;
leys to be Affected or \
Clogged by Sleet or \
lee Storm. Simple '■
in construction, well i
made from the best \
materials, noiseless j
in opera Hon.
Beauty, Simflici- ¡ $(Qrm JgS
ty and Durability
Combined.
Tfie Self-Govern-
ing Principles pe-
culiar to the IX L,
covered by patents
which are our prop-
erty and controlled
by us, enable us to
construct a Wind
Mill far superior to
any now before the
public.
OUR MOTTO:
The Best in the
Market..
" What is worth doing at atl is worth doing well."
A. B. FOWLER, Ag't,
ifi6 Elm St., Dallas, Texas,
WELLS' MACHINE
WORKS. SSL
FOSTORIA, OHIO
Want every neraoti who ú
inter cited In boring for
Water, Oil, Gat or
Minerals <° write for
mineral , th<,irNewU.
hiitratea Catalog ue of Well
Mukitic Machinery&T00U
Mailed FB.B3D.
;'g ROYAL
ilíllUo
Rend our special clubbing offer on page 7
UllMWS FEED GHIHCER and
Submersed Stock Tank WaterHeater
AN Indispensable tojarmer , Dairymen and
- - - VUMPd. Ianks,Ovllnd«rs. I'lne,
Catalogue, aud mention this
K. U.WlNQEli, Freeport, 111.
StockHatiera. l'UMPd.Tanks,Ov1ind«rs. PI
eto. Write lor Catal
paper.
SMALLEY
— * ttltimW
nnnnc-'Kixiii ceiiim MO rmee euncea,
uUUUo inter ano trcao home nicM,*DMl
• cmcuue s«« nunincs. rana cnginci i ko«t.
an pMlUrabr anMd of all otb n In the uotuitjj, and mm
Bled. ShippedUi njr «pousihUf nuor in tho U. B.orOanads, tul
liu vnrj I
I UIU|lilirv Bll'min U« >V<X
'o?,mnmU<id t ok foodlui""^!!! be nulled five tojMpaiMi
i armera oulj, noon npplleatlnn, provnUn* ¡Mnlfoii it aufu
vf paper In wmoh thin advmilHonwnt was Botloed. __^^St
SMALLEY MFQ. CO.
MANITOWOO, WIS.
TIM INM.LCY BUTTER, «lib I
Alkfur
I Spttini introituotiim
yriru and term.
iscksl Csrdir.
■.'píiÜE
IMALLEV TRCAO POWER «IVB tOVERNOR.
FARMERS, you can-
not Httord to buy u
Sulky Plow until you
httvo exumlnéd the
merits of tho Tricycle.
II in nor ranted the Ughtct
draft and to work equal
to any other plow made
In any bind of land.
It has received the
enthusiastic pralso or
thousands of T< xas
farmers.
If not sold by your
morohant, hnvo hlui
order 0110 lor you, or
write us for circular,
price and terms.
i -t ItT.ITV
V ,>f
► AV .V
0HÍ1BUU
mahi ACTUREBS
In order to Introduoe
Into now localities we
will send a Tricycle to
rcspontlble farmers to
be settled for when It
does good work. We
do not offer it aa tbe
clieapeit hut the best
uinde for the money
we ask.
Do not be deceived
by agenta oiatuung to
have a cheap plow thai
Is Juc na good as the
Trloyole. Fifty years
experience and ample
capital enable ua to
produeo a llrst-olnns
jiiow at at least possU
le cost.
,<t OUI INDOUFF CO., Tknllats, Texas.
THE. SWANN COTTON GrlN
PEHaHn AND OOKrDEKTSfilH.,
Manufactured by
SWANN BROS. & MOORE,
0
o
-♦>
CD
P
CT
CD
1
<
n
o
■a
u
ñ"
CD
a-
The LANE MILL is ready now to receive orders for
ODENHEIMER COTTON BUGGING,
44 inches wide, weighing three-c|uarters of a pound to the yard, which cover-
ing was adopted for permanent and exclusive use by the
National Farmers Alliance and Wheel of America,
at their meeting at Birmingham, Alabama, on May 15 and 16, 1889. Price,
j 2cents net cash, f. 0. b., New Orleans.
On orders aggregating 25,000 yards during the season, 2 per cent allowance.
Orders to be placcd as soon as possible.
Orders once placcd are irrevocable and no cancellation will be accepted
under any circumstances.
Orders to state when bagging is to be shipped. All shipments to be paid
for against sight drafts, bill of lading attached.
A deposit of 25 per cent must accompany all orders, unless same come
through a responsible business house or bank, or else be accompanied by a
certificate of bank or responsible business house, stating they will pay our sight
draft for the amount of the bagging when shipped.
The bagging is put up in rolls of about 50 yards each.
It is desirable, in order to make payments easier, to direct your orders to be
shipped twice a month, say from August to December. To avoid mistakes,
make ypur shipping directions very plain.
We are probably the only mill making the bagging 44 inches wide this sea-
son, for which reason, we think we will be overcrowded with orders soon; it is
desirable, therefore, if you wish your orders booked in time, that you place
them at once. THE LANE MILLS,
New Orleans.
Van Winkle Gin and Machinery Co.,
W, IS; l£L*A.Ivl, Manager. *
DALLAS,
TEXAS,
MANUFAOTDH ERH OF
Cotton Gins, Presses, Huller Cotton Gins,«
Cotton Seed Oil Mill Machinery,
and Cotton Cleaners.
The estatyhhrtient of our Branch Factory at Dallas has been a great ben-
efit to the Texas ginners. A stock of Gins, Feeders, Condensers, Presses, and
Cotton Cleaners always on hand. The best attention given to all orders in
trusted to us. Writ* for catalogue, prices and tenns. Always mention TH®
Mercury. Address, VAN WINKLE GIN AND MACHINERY CO.
Dallas,

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The Southern Mercury, Texas Farmers' Alliance Advocate. (Dallas, Tex.), Vol. 8, No. 34, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 22, 1889, newspaper, August 22, 1889; Dallas, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth186101/m1/3/ocr/: accessed April 19, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; .

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