The Rice Thresher (Houston, Tex.), Vol. 36, No. 54, Ed. 1 Saturday, April 30, 1949 Page: 3 of 4

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THE THRESHER
Three
The
Owlook
MARTIN and MILLER
Although they may not get to play too much, there will be several
fine sophomores on the Owl football team next year. Any weakness that
coach Jess Neely may have in his senior-loaded squad, however, could,
arra probably will be, solved with second year talent.
The line gets loads of help just where it is needed. There are five
guards, any of whom could easily
develop into a star overnight. Four
of the huskies, Billy Valentine, Ger-
ald Olive, J. B. Virdell, and Ed Mc-
Leash, played staunch ball for the
Bolts while Don Mullenix, layed up
with injuries during the football
season, may be the best of them
all. All of these boys weigh in the
vicinty of 190 pounds.
Tackles ? Take your choice of
these 200-pounders: Charles Bittner,
Ted Watson, Britt Swain, James
Timmona-, and Buddy Wilson. Tim-
mons is the "hoss" of the bunch,
while Wilson, a converted end, is
as mean as they come.
The one freshman who appears to
have a good chance of starting next
fall is end Bill Howton, 6 foot, one
inch speedster from Plainview. Bill
a good hurdler in track, has a
knack of getting in the open for
pass receptions and knows how to
carry a ball once he gets it in an
open field. Other promising ends are
6 foot 5 inch Sonny McCurry form
Wharton and hustling Hardy Dean.
Backs, too, are not lacking. Billy
Bur^halter, who just might get a
starting position, could evolve into
the greatest defensive back in Rice's
history. Though comparatively small
(5 foot, 10 inches by 170 pounds),
Burkhalter was responsible for
many crushing tackles last fall. And
he's no slouch when it comes to
carrying the ball, too.
The freshman track meet, sched-
uled for this afternoon at the
Stadium, has been canceled. The
meet which had been scheduled for
last Saturday along with a varsity
match with A&M was rained out
then and had been reset for today,
but difficulties have arisen and the
Fish have found it impossible to
make the trip.
Thus, the one home meet of the
season has gone by the boards, and
fans will have to wait till next year
for a look at the numerous frosh
stars.
The varsity meanwhile has seven
members in Des Moines, Iowa, to-
Campus Fashions
at Sears
Main at Richmond
Wayside at Harrisburg
SPALDING
(MY60SM,
> PABDMECf
NOW WE
6C3TTA JUMP
TM' NET/
A* NOHWQZ
( INTKOUBLE...
weweM r
AN' WON/
w
still
tume after
all that
tough
play/
A SEMI-FINAL MATCH
IN THE BEVERLY HILL'S TDURNEV
WENT TO 102 GAMES AND
USTED4 HOURS AND45 MINUTES
....THEVHAD TO FINISH UNDER
THE LIGHTS /
Rawhide reinforcements
at the shoulders of
SPALDING and
WRIGHT & DITSON
Rackets keep strings
tighter longer . . . and
"FIBRE WELDING"
and "FIBRE SEALING"
give extra strength.
SPALDING
sets the pace in sports
day for the Drake Relays, and it
wouldn't be too surprising if they
brought home some trophies. Mak-
ing the trips are James Hoff, Tony
Carr, Tom Cox, rfed Brown, Augie
Erfurth, Otha Byrd, and Verne Mc-
Grew.
If Neely needs speed he need
look no fatrher than Gene (Quick)
Silver and Teddy (Speed) Riggs.
Riggs may not be able to talk as
fast as his namesake, but anyone
who saw the Bolt-Shorthorn game
will agree that he can run about as
fast as any one. Silver, who showed
a cat-like agility while quarterback-
ing the Bolts' split T last fall, has
been shifted to halfback where he
and Riggs are ready to join varsity
men in giving the conference's ends
a run for their money.
If he decides to go out for foot-
ball next fall, compact Mike Mi-
ction (5 foot, 10 inches by 166
pounds) will show fans some of the
best line-backing in the conference
as well as some steady ball carry-
ing, while the "sleeper" of the
bunch may be John Duke from Sher-
man, a slim (6 feet by 175 pounds)
line busting fullback.
They'll help a lot.
RECREATION
BOWLING ALLEY
6445 SOUTH MAIN
AIR CONDITIONED THROUGHOUT
20 BRUNSWICK LANES
"Come On Over and Make
It a Second Home"
It serves her right!
MARY JANE gives the telephone in her
house a real work-out.
But we're not worried a bit. We know
Mary Jane's telephone is going to keep right
on delivering good service year after year.
Because the Bell System puts a lot of time,
thought, and testing into making telephone
equipment as rugged and trouble-free as
possible.
Tests are constantly under way at the
Bell Telephone Laboratories. There, for
example, new types of telephone instru-
ments are put through a school of hard
knocks. Dials and other parts are given
strength and wear tests. Even the bottom
of the telephone set has been designed
and checked to make sure that it will not
scratch or stain furniture.
Such test$— on little things as well as on
big things—help give you the world's best
telephone service at the lowest possible
cost.
BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM
m

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The Rice Thresher (Houston, Tex.), Vol. 36, No. 54, Ed. 1 Saturday, April 30, 1949, newspaper, April 30, 1949; Houston, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth230809/m1/3/ocr/: accessed April 25, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Rice University Woodson Research Center.

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