History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857 Page: 16 of 42

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CHAPTER
V.
In the summer of 1839 the Cherokees became hostile and resolved to fight.
The army was called out and I was appointed a member of the board of war.
I received a commission as captain and orders to raise a company, guard the
Sabine river from Logansport to Trammel's Trace and to prevent the Cherokees
from being supplied with arms and ammunition by other Indians and Mexicans.
I was also appointed Commissioner for Shelby county, to take charge of all confiscated
property, prevent its removal or destruction and turn it over to the government
of Texas. I had only ten men. I placed eight on the road from Logansport
to Nacogdoches, and taking Josh English and John May, went to Trammel's
Trace to make observations. On the way I met with a man named Robertson.
This man had joined the Mexicans in the rebellion with the hope of
obtaining office. Failing to obtain promotion he became dissatisfied and made
his escape. Knowing the plans of the Mexicans and their conspiracies with the
Indians and their intention to raid upon the Texan people, he communicated the
information to General Burleson, who at once followed the Mexicans from whom
Robertson had deserted and killed them all, and from the information of Robertson
was enabled to overtake Juan Flores, who was coming with nine mule-loads
of presents for the Indians. The- band was attacked, all killed and the train
captured. Robertson proved of great assistance as a spy, being acquainted
with the language of the different tribes of Indians and thus able to go among
them and learn their numbers and intentions. He rendered effective service by
going among the Cherokees, learning their designs and reporting them, the
night before the battle in which Chief Bowles was killed. After this Robertson
went to his home in Shelby county, to visit his family, his residence being in the
neighborhood where the Strickland's lived. Here he was set upon by his
enemies, the Strickland's and others with whom he had previously had
difficulties, and brutally murdered. As soon as I was informed of the affair I
returned, recovered his property and delivered it to his family. Robertson's
body had been buried by Colonel Straw before my arrival. When the army
returned and Henry Strickland found what had been done, he declared his
intention to kill me and came armed to the house of Josh English where I was.
I was engaged in hauling corn and while unloading the wagon Strickland and
English entered into conversation at the fence, near me. I was apprehensive
of an attack, but time passed and I was not molested, and not again disturbed
by this man. Fil.ally he was killed in a personal difficulty with one Shoemaker.

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857, book, January 1, 1883; Fort Worth, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/m1/16/ocr/: accessed December 6, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .