History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857 Page: 41 of 42

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II

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horses
belonging to Mansco and Tucker. They pursued me a mile and a quarter,
when I met Stone. I was shot at twice before I reached him, and the arrows
grazed me in both instances. Here we were fought by the whole party.
The Indians shooting at us in all directions except the rear, and the fight continued
until about two hours before sundown. The boy was wounded in the
thigh by an arrow, Stone was touched on the hand. We became separated,
each trying to make his escape. Stone and myself reached Stephenville in
safety that night. The boy hid himself in a pile of driftwoocT in the branch till
morning. In Stephenville I obtained the assistance of four men, and armed
myself with a shot-gun. We arrived at the fighting ground. trailed the Indians
a little that night, followed them the next day, but they had all gone but one
who was so badly wounded by Stone in the fight that he died there. The boy
was found, his wounds dressed and he got well. Stone's oxen had broken away
with his wagon, the fore wheels became detached and left the body, which with
the contents were found uninjured except in the places struck by bullets and
arrows. The Indians had been to the houses of Redmond Stone and Wm.
Culver and would have murdered the women and children there remaining,
but the scout following the trail after my fight frightened them away. Fresh
tracks of their horses were all around the houses. Wm. Culver was captain of a
scouting party.
CHAPTER XX.
And now when about to conclude the biography of my eventful life, I will
break the thread of my story and return a little Before secession a regiment
to be commanded by Col. Van Rimple was stationed by order of General Sam
Houston at Double mountain on Hubbard's creek and to keep out scouts all
the time. Buck Barry, now of Bosque county, commanded a company in this
regiment. I was a member and served with it until the states seceded when we
were disbanded and I returned home. The regiment reorganized for the war.
It was my intention to go into the Southern army, but my son Nathan volunteered
and I was then obliged to remain at home. My son was captured at
Arkansas Post, carried to Camp Douglass and died there in prison. Finding I
could not go and take the place of my sick son in Arkansas I went to Bayou
Mason in Louisiana with Alex. McNeil and Ben Sparks with a drove of cattle.
I furnished forty steers and went as a hand at two dollars a day, holding my
cattle until I got my pay. We camped fourteen miles above Delhi the night before
it was burned; crossed Bayou Mason and went to Joe's Bayou, was there
when the first battle of Vicksburg was fought and distinctly heard the reports
of the cannon. At Lake Washington we arrived in the evening with 106 beeves
immediately after the Federal soldiers had left for Arkansas Post. I sold the
106 beeves there, and then went back to Joe's Bayou and sold the remainder.
We then went to Delhhi to take the cars but were delayed by the soldiers about
five days. I then returned home.

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857, book, January 1, 1883; Fort Worth, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/m1/41/ocr/: accessed September 27, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .