[Penitentiary Hollow] Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title [Penitentiary Hollow]

Date

  • Digitized: 2006-10-23

Language

  • No Language

Description

  • Content Description: This is a photograph of a woman and young boy (both of them unidentified) posing among the tall rock formations at Penitentiary Hollow in Lake Mineral Wells State Park.
  • Physical Description: 1 photograph : b&w

Subject

  • University of North Texas Libraries Browse Structure: People - Individuals
  • University of North Texas Libraries Browse Structure: Sports and Recreation
  • University of North Texas Libraries Browse Structure: Landscape and Nature - State and National Parks
  • Keyword: Lake Mineral Wells State Park
  • Keyword: cliffs

Primary Source

  • Item is a Primary Source

Coverage

  • Place Name: United States - Texas - Parker County
  • Time Period: new-sou
  • Coverage Date: 1920?

Collection

  • Name: A. F. Weaver Collection
    Code: AFWC

Institution

  • Name: Boyce Ditto Public Library
    Code: BDPL

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Photograph

Format

  • Image

Identifier

  • Accession or Local Control No: AWO_1052P

Note

  • Display Note: Additional historical information: A dam across Rock Creek east of Mineral Wells in Parker County was built to impound a new water supply for the city of Mineral Wells. A joint committee of nine named the new water source Lake Mineral Wells in December 1919. When it became necessary to dam up Palo Pinto Creek in the 1960's to obtain a larger source of water, the city gave Lake Mineral Wells to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission for a State Park. Penitentiary Hollow in the State Park is one of the few areas in Texas where rock climbers may gain mountain-climbing experience. As the photograph shows, spectacular vertical cliffs, 40 feet and more in height, are well-adapted to honing climbing skills. The area gets its name from the story that cattle thieves were thought to cache their booty there, preparatory to driving the hapless animals onward for sale. Anyone detected in the area was therefore likely to find lodging in a local penitentiary.