The Bastrop Advertiser (Bastrop, Tex.), Vol. 156, No. 45, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 6, 2009 Page: 1 of 17

2008 CENTRAL TEXAS FOOTBALL GUIDE INSIDE TODAY'S BASTROP ADVERTISER
Wm jBastrop Sldoertise
Volume 156, Number 45
Texas' Oldest Weekly Newspaper Since March 1, 1853 Semi-Weekly Since Sept. 5, 1977
THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 2009 50<s
INSIDE
AFFAIRS
""'if m nsnini
If r'ssi
BOOK SALE
Friends of Bastrop Public Library
raise funds.
—Page A12
MONEY BACK?
Will the council refund deposits?
—Page A8
BISD RESPONSE
Board president speaks out.
—Page A2
POLICE BLOTTER
■ On July 30, at 1:10 a.m., Sgt.
Burnis Bobbitt saw a vehicle
parked just inside the locked
southwest gate of Wright Distribut-
ng Co. on Texas 71 with the head-
lights on and motor running, the
police report said. Bobbitt couldn't
see anyone inside the vehicle, so
he and two other officers checked
the fence around the business.
It was secure and no one was in
sight, the report said. Bobbitt used
bolt cutters to cut the chain on the
gate and checked the vehicle, but
there was no one around and the
keys were in the ignition, the re-
port said. The officers secured the
business and the vehicle, leaving
a note on the driver's window and
bringing the keys to the Bastrop
Police Department for safekeeping,
the report said.
■ On July 30, Sgt. Bobbit and
Officers Sandra Hernandez
and Raven Prettyman, were dis-
See BLOTTER, Page A4
WEATHER
THURSDAY FORECAST
HI: 96
LO: 72
MOSTLY SUNNY AND
SEASONABLE
INDEX
Classifieds
Community
Pane B3
Paae A3
News
Sports
Pane A2
Pane B1
22 pages, two sections
Newsroom
(512) 321-2557
© The Bastrop Advertiser
We Recycle
AUSTIN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS
7 65668 78602 3
MUSEUM
Museum gets $200K
BY CYNDI WRIGHT
Editor
The planned Bastrop Heri-
tage and Visitor Center received
a shot in the arm Saturday when
Congressman Lloyd Doggett an-
nounced that Congress would
authorize a grant of $200,000 to
the Bastrop County Historical
Society for the project.
The money is not coming
from stimulus funds, Doggett
explained, but rather from funds
earmarked for economic develop-
ment.
"Today is indeed a great day
in Bastrop," exclaimed Mary Mc-
Murrey, president of the Society.
"This announcement moves this
project one giant step closer to
becoming a reality."
Under the terms of the Soci-
ety's agreement with the city of
Bastrop, which owns the prop-
erty the society plans to use,
funding for their capital cam-
paign program can come from
federal grants or disburse-
ments. Currently, the building
is used for city hall.
The money is in addition to
the $500,000 the city has al-
ready pledged from hotel/mo-
tel tax funds to renovate and
See MUSEUM, pageA7
Protesting
s\.
Contributed photo by K. Priscilla Jones
Health care reform protestors, some from the county and some from Austin, stand in front of Bastrop's city hall as Congressman Lloyd
Doggett leaves after presenting the Bastrop Historical Society with funds to help in their planned renovation of city hail nto a museum,
For more on the protest, see page A9.
COURTS
Man on
trial for
capital
murder
BY CYNDI WRIGHT
Editor
Jurors were visibly shaken
and one man wiped tears from
his eyes as the five men and
nine women viewed photo-
graphs of a badly bruised, dead
two-year-old boy at the begin-
ning of the capital murder trial
of Christopher Lee Murray in
Bastrop.
Murray
was charged
with capital
murder after
he allegedly
beat Robert
Faske to death
on June 11,
2007.
According
to law enforce-
ment reports,
at the time
of the child's
death, Murray told investiga-
tors that Robert had fallen
from a chair about two feet onto
a carpeted floor in a home near
Paige. An autopsy showed the
child had a skull fracture, bro-
ken neck and ribs, a damaged
liver and numerous bruises, ac-
cording to the report.
According to the state's sec-
ond witness, Celeste Arriga,
See TRIAL, page A4
CHRISTOPHER
MURRAY
EDUCATION
TAKS scores
a mixed bag
BY TERRY HAGERTY
Assistant Editor
The latest school ac-
countability ratings from
the Texas Education
Agency are numbers that
truly need asterisks at-
tached to them to fairly
assess how students per-
formed.
The TEA officially
released the scores July
31.
While the Bastrop
Independent School Dis-
trict had three schools
perform at the highest
ANIMALS
level - exemplary - one
school, Bastrop Middle
School, was rated at the
lowest scoring level -
academically unaccept-
able.
One fact to keep in
mind, educators empha-
size, is that one student
group can miss the "ac-
ceptable" scoring level
by one percentage point
in one subject - and the
whole school will be rat-
ed "unacceptable" as a
result.
See TASK, page A7
A busy time for
livestock deputy
BY DENIS MCGINNESS
Special to the Advertiser
Bastrop County has
been under some hard
times lately and it's not
just the people that are
suffering. Horses, don-
keys, goats and cattle
have found tough going
and ended up on the road,
on a stranger's property
or maybe even let loose
by down-and-out owners.
Tommy Cooper knows
the stories all too well.
He's been the Bastrop
County livestock deputy
for nine years. It's his
job to answer calls and
corral the wayward ani-
mals.
"The economy, the
cost of hay and feed-it's a
bad situation all around
for some folks," he said
during an interview at
the county impound lot.
Cooper's stint as a
ranch manager for 20
See LIVESTOCK, page A5
AVIATION
BHS i rad pilots 'first' flight
Christopher Cice at helm of Alaska Airlines
inaugural service from Austin to Seattle
BY TERRY HAGERTY
Assistant Editor
The youngest li-
censed pilot in Bas-
trop County - in 1980,
that is - piloted the
first commercial flight
of Alaska Airlines to
Austin-Bergstrom In-
ternational Airport on
Monday.
Christopher Cice,
a Bastrop High School
graduate who is now
46, helped inaugurate
Alaska Airlines non-
stop service between Se-
attle and Austin when he
landed a 737 jet around
3:30 p.m. Monday.
Cice attended BHS
all four years - graduat-
ing in 1981 - and played
trumpet for the school
band. He also worked at
the Bastrop Advertiser for
three years.
"I used to do photo
plates on Sunday night
and midweek for the Ad-
vertiser and also shoot
photos for the newspa-
per," Cice said.
At BHS, Cice also took
photos for the yearbook.
A July 24,1980, article
on Cice in the Advertiser
noted he was "the youngest
licensed pilot in Bastrop."
The article notes that Cice
was "an industrious youth
who has about four jobs
going at once."
Cice said he got inter-
ested in flying after he
flew with his father (Carl
Cice) on a commercial jet
to Ohio. The elder Cice
is a retired Air Force jet
See AVIATION, page A4
SSI -
- i ~
*
Contributed photo
Bastrop High School graduate Christopher Cice on Monday piloted the inaugural flight of Alaska Airlines'
737-jet service from Seattle to Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.

Upcoming Pages

Here’s what’s next.

upcoming item: 2 2 of 17
upcoming item: 3 3 of 17
upcoming item: 4 4 of 17
upcoming item: 5 5 of 17

Show all pages in this issue.

This issue can be searched. Note: Results may vary based on the legibility of text within the document.

Tools / Downloads

Get a copy of this page .

Citing and Sharing

Basic information for referencing this web page. We also provide extended guidance on usage rights, references, copying or embedding.

Reference the current page of this Newspaper.

Wright, Cyndi. The Bastrop Advertiser (Bastrop, Tex.), Vol. 156, No. 45, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 6, 2009, newspaper, August 6, 2009; Bastrop, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth252602/m1/1/ocr/: accessed December 12, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Bastrop Public Library.