[Hotel O'Neill - 313 Spring Street]

Description

Copy negative of storefronts on Spring Street in Palestine, Texas. There are two connected brick buildings, two stories on the left and four stories on the right; they have some brick embellishments around the windows. The first building appears to have two storefronts that have a sidewalk cover across the front and a barber's pole on the left corner as well as the words "Bus Station" on one window. To the right, a store labeled "O'Neill Drug Store" is in the larger building, and a roof with a second-story balcony is visible on the far right, over another entrance. There ... continued below

Physical Description

1 photograph : negative, b&w ; 4 x 5 in.

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. 1930~.

Context

This photograph is part of the collection entitled: Rescuing Texas History, 2007 and was provided by Palestine Public Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 147 times . More information about this photograph can be viewed below.

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Provided By

Palestine Public Library

Located in Anderson County, the Palestine Public Library provides access to information and various programs for the community's benefit. They received a Rescuing Texas History grant to aid in digitization of select materials, including photos taken during a Historic Resources Study in 1991.

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Description

Copy negative of storefronts on Spring Street in Palestine, Texas. There are two connected brick buildings, two stories on the left and four stories on the right; they have some brick embellishments around the windows. The first building appears to have two storefronts that have a sidewalk cover across the front and a barber's pole on the left corner as well as the words "Bus Station" on one window. To the right, a store labeled "O'Neill Drug Store" is in the larger building, and a roof with a second-story balcony is visible on the far right, over another entrance. There are cars parked along the street and several people visible outside the buildings.

Physical Description

1 photograph : negative, b&w ; 4 x 5 in.

Notes

Palestine's O'Neill Hotel was located at 313 Spring Street but was actually the third hotel to sit on the site. In 1873, following the coming of the railroad to town, the Laclede Hotel was built there, but was destroyed by fire in 1876. The following year, a Dr. Manning of Oakwood erected a brick building known as the International Hotel on that location. It was purchased in 1882 by Col. George Burkitt who turned over operations to Mrs. Emma Nolen. During her tenure, the property was known as the Nolen Hotel, but when she moved to St. Louis, Col. Burkitt himself took over the management. That building was razed in 1922 and the "new" O'Neill, maiden surname of Burkitt's Irish born mother, was constructed on the site. The O'Neill boasted not only hot and cold running water in its guest rooms, it was also equipped with an electric Otis elevator and a radio receiving set on the mezzanine for entertainment of the hotel's guests. When Texas Gov. Ross Sterling declared martial law in the East Texas Oil Fields and ordered the National Guard to take it over and shut-in all wells, the O'Neill became the staging center where the command cadre spent its first night "in the field." During the oil boom, the hotel was a favorite meeting place for oil operators, lease hounds and geologists. Among the famous early day oil men who slept under its roof and conducted business out of its rooms were H.L. Hunt, Harold Byrd, Jack Frost and other wildcatters. Those were the "glory days" of the venerable hotel, but not the end. The hotel was sold a number of times, and despite halfhearted attempts to restore it, the condition of the building went downhill. It was demolished in August 1983 and the property is still vacant today.

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Identifier

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Collections

This photograph is part of the following collection of related materials.

Rescuing Texas History, 2007

The 2007 edition of Rescuing Texas History brings together photographs, postcards, letters, and more to give a glimpse into the rich history of the state.

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Creation Date

  • 1930~

Added to The The Portal to Texas History

  • June 26, 2007, 11:41 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 9, 2014, 7:29 p.m.

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Yesterday: 1
Past 30 days: 3
Total Uses: 147

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[Hotel O'Neill - 313 Spring Street], photograph, 1930~; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26485/: accessed August 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Palestine Public Library.