The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane Page: 29

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CHAPTER II.
The Tale of Destruction Grows-A Night of Horrors-Sufferings
of the Survivors-Relief Measures by the National
Government.
HE following graphic account of the terrible disaster is from
the pen of an eye-witness, written within twenty-four hours
after the city was struck by the hurricane: "No direct wire
communication has been established between Dallas and Galveston,
and such a connection 'J not likely to be established earlier
than to-morrow. The gulf coast, back for a distance of approximately
twenty miles, is one vast marsh, and in many places the
water is from three to ten feet deep, making progress toward the
stricken city slow and unremunerative in the matter of direct
news.
" Although Dallas is 300 miles from Galveston, all efforts for
direr'^communication centre here, as it is the headquarters of the
eitegraph and telephone systems of the State. Hundreds of linemen
were hurried to the front on Saturday night and Sunday
morning from this city to try to put wire affairs in workable
order.
WIND STORM OF GIANT FORCE.
"Less than half a dozen out of approximately half a hundred
wires between Dallas and Houston have thus far been gotten into
operation. This is because the wind storm extended inland with
terrific force for a distance of Ioo miles, and destroyed telegraphic,
telephonic and railroad connections to such an extent as nearly to
paralyze these channels of communication. With the best of
weather conditions, it will require several weeks to restore these
systems to anything like their normal state.
" Nothing like definite and tangible information is likely to be
received from Galveston earlier than Wednesday or Thursday.
All reliable information that has been received up to this hour
comes from the advance guard of the relief forces and the linemen
sent out by the railroad, telegraph and telephone companies.
29

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Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane, book, 1900~; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/m1/40/ocr/: accessed September 28, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .