The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane Page: 31

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A NIGHT OF HORRORS.
bales. John Clay, one of the foremost men in the cotton trade at
Dallas, addressed wire inquiries to all accessible points in the
cotton growing districts of Texas concerning crop losses. He
states they will reach ten per cent. of the State's crop. Spot cotton
sold at ten cents per pound on the market, an advance of half a cent
a pound over Saturday's best figures.
RELIEF WORK STARTED.
"Relief work for the Galveston sufferers started in Dallas
vigorously on receipt of an appeal from Governor Sayers. The
City Council appropriated $500. A mass meeting of citizens
appointed soliciting committees, as did also the Odd Fellows and
Knightsof Pythias. Fully $Io,ooo in cash had been subscribed
by night.
" A special train was started for Houston over the Houston
and Texas Central Railroad carrying committees of Odd Fellows,
Knights of Pythias and citizens to render aid and distribute
relief in the storm districts. At the request of many persons in
Dallas a telegram was sent to Governor Sayers by J. C. McNealus,
Secretary of the Dallas County Democratic Executive Committee,
asking the Governor his idea as to calling an extra session of
the Legislature. Governor Sayers this evening replied as follows:
"'Telegram received. I will do nothing until I can hear
directly and authoritatively from Galveston except to call upon
the people to render assistance.'
"As there is approximately a surplus of $2,000,ooo cash in
the State Treasury, it is reasoned that the citizens of Texas would
endorse the Governor's action should he conclude to call a special
session to furnish public relief to the stricken sections of the State.
I " A bulletin received at the Houston and Texas Central head,quarters
from the headquarters of the company in Houston stated
that a courier from the relief force had just arrived. He stated
that signal reports from men sent forward to Galveston Island to
the relief parties on the main land read:
"'Sixty dead bodies in one block. Six hundred corpses recovered
and 400 more reported. People dying from injuries and sick-

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Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane, book, 1900~; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/m1/42/ocr/: accessed December 5, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .