The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane Page: 71

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CRY OF DISTRESS IN GALVESTON. 71
soon be solved so far as the getting people from the island to the
mainland was concerned.
Hundreds applied to Governor Sayre for permits to go to Galveston,
but he refused all, saying that there were already too many
people there.
THE DEVASTATION APPALLING.
The Quartermaster's Department at Washington, received the
following from Galveston:
" Quartermaster General, Washington: Referring to my telegrams
of 9th and loth, I have, subject to approval, suspended the
Crockett construction contracts, and again urgently recommend
that contractors be paid for labor and material in place and on the
ground. All swept away and lost beyond recovery. Fortifications
at Crockett, Jacinto and Travis all destroyed and cannot be rebuilt
on present sites. Recommend continuance of my office here only
long enough to recover Crockett office safes and morning gun,
when located; also to close accounts and ship my office and recovered
property where directed. I fear Galveston is destroyed
beyond its ability to recover. Loss of life and property appalling.
" BAXTER, Quartermaster."
VESSEL ORDERED TO GALVESTON.
President McKinley received a telegram from Governor Sayres,
of Texas, asking that a light draft vessel be sent to Galveston to
assist in the communication between the island and the mainland.
The message was referred to the Treasury Department, and an
order was issued to the revenue cutter Winona, at Mobile, to proceed
to Galveston without a moment's unnecessary delay. The
Lighthouse Board also ordered the lighthouse tender Arbutus, then
at New Orleans, to clear at once for Galveston.
Captain Shoemaker, Chief of the Revenue Cutter Service, is'
apprehensive as to the fate of the cutter Galveston, which was anchored
in Galveston harbor at the beginning of the storm. It is
assumed that she put to sea, but as three full days have elapsed
since she was heard from there are fears for her safety.

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Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane, book, 1900~; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/m1/90/ocr/: accessed December 10, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .