The Rusk Cherokeean (Rusk, Tex.), Vol. 16, No. 15, Ed. 1 Friday, October 20, 1933 Page: 1 of 4

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The Rusk vHErokeean
vain w.xiCH IS CONSOLIDATED THE PRESS-JOU KNAL
WORKING K)h A GREATER RUSK AND A MORE PROSPEROUS CHLkOKtt ,
ORIGINALLY ESTABLISHED FEBRUARY 27, 1850.
RUSK, CHEROKEE COUNTY, TEX AS, FRIDAY OCTOBER 20, 1933
VOLUME 16 NO. 15.
' fcl
WORK IS RESUMED
ON BY NO. 40
Active construction work on the
last four miles of Highway No. 40
from Rusk to Alto is now in progress
and the contract for this work was
3et to Vilbig and Co., and engineers
have been busy and the work is now
being done.
One part of the contract stipulat-
ed that local labor be used and sev-
eral hundred men have been signed
up.
The Highway Department is gee-
ting r'ght of way from Wells into
Lufkin also.
Contract for the iron ore top so''
nnd oil on the part of the highway
already constructed from Rusk to
Alto—a little more than 8 miles,
has been let and work will begin im
mediately.
Highway engineers conferred in
Austjin Monday with delegations
from ten counties on new road pro-
jects. A Cherokee county delegat'on
was promised construction of High-
way 22 from Rusk ten miles west
when funds are available. Construe
tion of this road gap would com-
plete the Palestine—Rusk road.
JUDGE TELLS WHO'S TO BLAME
FOR LAX LAW ENFORCEMENT
Blama for the delay in adminis-
tration of criminal law was placed
on the ublic by Judge Noland G.
Williams in his charge to the Oc-
tober grand jury Monday.
"I have never understood the
aptathy and indifference of the
American people," Judge Williams
said. "If the average: American sees
a crime committed, it is hard to get
him to say anything about it to the
police, and, if the case goes to trial,
it is hard to get him to testify.
Yet, people wonder about the delay
in the law.
"I understand in England 21
days is the limit to try to case, get
a convi.ction, appeal, it and settle
it entirely. But in this country,
five or six or seven years is not
unusual."
Judge Williams declared law
enforcement lies with the juries, If
the grand jury does not indict and
the petit juiSes do not convict the
hands of officials are tied however
diligent and hard-working they may
be.
The court said this particular
grand jury was to investigate the
fee officials and at the end of the
term make a written report to the
court. The county auditor will
.•fid the investigators Judge Wil-
liams said. He told the jury it would
find the maudlin sympathy of the
people a great deterrent to law en-
forcement and he warned against
undeserved sympathy for youthful
f'rst offenders.
"You will find 80 to 85 per cent
of our crime is committeed by
young people from 17 to 23 years
old. Rome of these yung peoplo
need help. Some need another
chance. Rut I have had some sad
experiences In helping many Al-
most none show their appreciation
by keeping out. of trouble."— The
Dallas Dispatch.
FEDERAL OFFICIALS
IN TEXAS TODAY
Dallas, October 10.—The eyes of
the Nation are on Texas tcday, with
this State as host to the most brilliant
assemblage of Federal officials £-:vl
political personages ever gathered
here. But one name that of Presi-
dent Roosevelt—could be added to
make the three-day tour of Texas of
more importance to Texas and Tex-
ans.
The tour wtill g'.ve Demoncratic
Party officials every opportunity to
see the Lone Star State in all of its
mult:ple characteristics.
In Ft. Worti. the visitors have a
picture of the Western part of th3
State after having seen the towering
spires of oil field derricks in East
Texas.
At Dallas, and a vi&t to the State
Fair, they will find information and
see a picture of many of the agricul-
tural and business interests of the
State.
At Houston they w"ill v:ew Texas'
great waterway connections with thp
outside world.
Vice President John i'Siance Garner
LEASING AND ROYALTY DEALS
SHOW INCREASE HERE
Palestine, Oct. 19,—Leasing anii
royalty buying appeared to have
increased last night as more oil
men poured into Palestine. The buy-
ing of mineral rights had spread in-
to several counties, nnd large deals
were being talked of however, the
-i :c« of leasing remained around $5
^ acre.
Mrs, A. L. Watson and grandson
are visitiing In Alba.
JAMES A, FARLEY
J ir Far'ey was bo,-n fcrty five
years ago at Grassy Point, New
York. By the time the was 18 he had
completed his formal high school ed-
ucation and the commercial school
education and was ready for Tife. 4
years later he became town clerk at
Stony Point, N. Y., and there began
a political career as yet unmatched.
Seven years he remained in this
humble office. In 1918 Governor Al-
fred E. Smith appointed him Port
Warden in New York City, a , posi-
tion which he held but one year. In
1920 he was chosen Supervisor of
Rockland county, an office he held
three years. In 1923 Rockland coun-
ty sent him to the Assembly.
In 1924 Governor Smith appointed
Mr. Farley to the New York State
Athletic commission, and a year
later he became its chaiman. This
post he relinquished early this year
before entering President Roose-
velt's cabinet as Postmaster Genei'-
al..
Beginning in 1919 as chairman of
the Rockland county Democrt'c com-
mittor, Mr. Farley in 1928 became
secretary of the State Committee
and two years later was elected its
chairman. In 1932 at the National
Convention in Chicago, where) he was
constantly on tho field of political,'
battle as the leader of the Roosevelt
forces he was elected chairman of j
the National Committee. These two
par'" positions the most important
and influential in the Nat;on, he still
retains.
Breathing life into this record is
the man himself, the man who took
a little trip away from New York a
little over a year ago, traveling fast
because he traveled alone, and who|
returned with the Presidency safely
stowed away in Ifis vest pocket for
his friend, Franklin Delano Roose-
velt. Once Jim Farley emabarked on;
the campaign to elect Roosevelt, he
never turned aside or halted for an
instant. His confidence, his-optisim
captured the nation.
With the election over his political
duties to the Administration really
only began. He had given the coun-1
try the deck from which the cards of
the New Deal are being dealt. His is;
the task of keeping* the game goinpr, j
of building a Democracy that will be j
as vibrant and alive as its leader and j
as unselfishly dedicated to the Am-i
erican ideal of the fjreatcst good for
the greatest number.
In Jim Farley the American peo-
ple recognized a political genius, dy-
namo of the New Democracy. In
Jim Parley Texas recognizes a
friend.
v!
DETAILS OF 1934-35 1 S. PARMLEV
i rc |a
"Cavalier of chaparral" he was
dubbed—whilei America took to its
heart and adored this frank, out-
spoken, clear eyed and clear thinking
Texan, the most romatic figure it
has known in public life since An-
drew Jackson,
Sixty- four years ago. in Red Riv-
er county. John Nance Garner was
born. H:s was the typical boyhood of
a pioneer Texas rural community ex-
cept that young Garner distinguish-
ed himself from his assocites by close
application to his ambition, to be a;
lawyer and a public servant. Self
taught with a will in which his elders
recognized the metal spirit, John Gai-
ner wa.f admitted to the bar of Tc\x-
as in 1890. Eight years later he wn*
elected to the Texas Legislature, and
the career of the Texan who became
the most feared Democrat 'in the
county was launched.
John Garner served only two termr;
in the Texas House, as the member
from Uvalde. A Congressional re-
d:stricting took place then, and col
leagues who saw the stuff of which
he was made aided him in his first
election to congress, in 1903. Ever
since then without hesitation his dis-
trict has reurned him to Washington
feeling almost that it owed a duty to
do so no\ only to iself, but to the
Democratic party and to the county
at large.
In his 30 years at Washingtn, he
has acquired an intimate knowledge
of government and politics that make
him one of the most valued members
of the New Deal cabinet. He is abso-
lutely fool proof on matters of this
sort, as the Republicans early learn-
ed, and frequently to their discom-
fiture. Monetary matters and the
tariff were as simpel for him as the
first reader. By^ sheer dint of his in-
tellectual strength, and armed al-
ways with the facts, his leadership
of the Democratic minority in con-
gress was a vital a contribution to
this check and balance government
as hitsory has recorded.
During the long Republican tenure
in Washington, John Garner himself
was the Democratic position. In 1931
when the country began to see that
a new deal was needed to save it;
from destruction, John Garner was
(Continued on Page 4)
College Station.—Details of the
new 1934-35 cotton plan to be of-
fered Southern cotton growers by
the Agricultural Adjustment Admin-
istrattion were received here in a
telegram to O. B. Miartin director
of the Extension Service from C.
A. Cobb, chief of the cotton sec-
tion. The plan contemplates a 25
million acre crop next year, cash
rentals for the land unplanted with
cottjon, county "producflicAn control
associations of farmers, no plow up
campaigns, and parity prices for at
least a part of next year's crop.
Secretary Wallace also offers tof
cotton producers loans of 10 cents
per pound on their present crop to
enable them to hold their cotton un-
til prices are nearer a fair exchange
value. The new program Will allo-
cate the acreage by states among
cotton farmers and restrict total
plantings to approximately 25 mil-
lion acres next year. This is expect-
ed to be about 60 per cent of the
five year average for 1928 to 1932
inclusive, and this will be the basis
on which allotments are made to the
states, counties and individuals. The
grower will be compensated in part
by cash rentals for the land left
out of production on a sliding scale
based on the productivity of the land,
and the big feature of the new plan,
according to Mr. Cobb, is the domes-
tic allotment clause which provides
that a producer shall receive approx-
imately parity prices for that part
of next years crop consumed in the
United States. Payments are to be
based on the proportion of the five
year average production which is do-
mestically consumed.
The new program will operate
through county cofitcin pr^ducfjion
control associations through which
growers will enter into contracts for
two years with the Secretary of Ag-
riculture.. The acreage to be plant-
ed in 1934 is to be determined on or
before January 1, next. Compensa-
tion for 1935 reductions is to be on
the same basis as for next year. Re-
ductions for 1935 in acreage will
not be more than 25 per cent of the
five year average, Mr. Cobb said.
Mr. and Mrs, Lester Maness spent
Sunday in Dallas.
L. S. Parmley, son of Mr. and Mrs.
E. M. Parmley passed away yester-
day morn;ng a 5 o'clock after an ill-
ness of about two weeks
Ho was removed from his home to
Jacksonville but death caine just as
he arrived at the hospital.
He was a young man of about 25
years and is survived by three bro-
ilers, two sisters and his father and
mother. The funeral will be held at
the home of his parents this after-
noon at 2 with internment at Atoy
cemetery by the Wallace Undertak-
ing Company.
CAMP FERE GIRLS
The Camp Fire Girls of Rusk
went on a sunrise breakfast recent-
ly. The trail was a winding one and
full of interesting things to obser-
vei The girls ate ravenously of ba-
con and eggs and cocoa appropriat-
ely flavored with sand and leaves.
They are planning many more ex-
cursions into the woods during the
beautiful Autum days. Those pre-
sent were; Rose Mildred McDonald,
Olive B. Meredith, Sarah June Odom
Francis Monroe, Mildred and Mar-
jie McCommis, Grace Bagley, Fred-
die and Bobby Jane Banks, Irene
Grogan and Helen Reed.
NEW COUNTY AGENT
TOOK CHARGE MONDAY
G. L. Clyburn, our new county
agent, arrived Monday and began
work at once.
Mr. Clyburn was enr ?ed in ag-
ricultural work in Fa., .tte county,
coming fiere from LaGrango.
He has be<en very busy this week
as there have been many cotton
checks coming in and notices to be
sent out.
He reports that about 500 checks
are yet to he distributed before the
work on the cotton option can be
started,
MARRIED
Monday morning at 11 o'clock at
the home of the officiating pastor,
Rev. G. M. Read, Mr. John D. Mc-
Carty and Miss Louise Cotton were
un'ted 'ir. marriage. Their j* many
friends wish for them .sucaeSig' an:
happiness. They will Ittlmhome
in Rusk.
Postmaster General T- t-c*/ V- 1 v
| SOUND NEW ASTQR H°H?TS°F |
Last Times Tonitel
"PENT HOUSE"
With y
Warner Baxter Mryna Ley gj
Saturday, Oct. 21st.
TOM KEENE
"SCARF. T.T miVER" f
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with RQ5COE ATES, DOROTHY WILLON,
EDGAR KENNEDY ^
Saturday 11 P. M.—Sunday Only
"STAGE MOTHER" %
with ALICE BRADY of "When Ladies Meet"
FANCHOT TONE—MRYNA LOY
Mon.-Tues,, Oct. 28-24
KAY FRANCIS—GEO. BRENT in g
"THE KEYHOLE" |
N Coming Soon:. 'GOLD DIGGERS of 1933" I
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The Rusk Cherokeean (Rusk, Tex.), Vol. 16, No. 15, Ed. 1 Friday, October 20, 1933, newspaper, October 20, 1933; Rusk, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth291614/m1/1/ocr/: accessed June 22, 2024), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Singletary Memorial Library.

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