History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families Page: 116

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116 HISTORY OF TEXAS.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

cies, on Keechie creek, and the Wacoes, who
were then occupying their village at Waco.
The first trouble was brought about by raids
being made on them by bands of white men.
The raids were made in the summer of 1835,
and the following spring news reached the
fort of the advance of the Mexicans under
Santa Anna. Mr. Anglin, believing that the
fort and all the inmates would fall victims to
Mexican foes and hostile Indians, tried to induce
the Parkers to abandon it and retire to
the settlements beyond the Trinity. But this
they refused to do. Taking his family, Mr.
Anglin, in company with Mr. Faulkenberry
and family and Mr. Bates and family, sought
safety at old Fort Iounbton, near Palestine.
lie did not return to Limestone county until
the spring of 1838, when Spriingfield, afterward
the county seat, was laid out, he being
present and assisting in this labor. For four
or five years following this date lie resided
principally in the settenients in Grimes county,
but in January, 1844, took up his permnanent
residence on his claim, where he lived
until his last marriage, and until his death,
near Mount Calmn, in January, 1874, aged
seventy-six years. lie assisted in the organization
of the county, held a number of minor
local positions at an earlier day, was an unlettered
man, but possessed considerable force
of character, the elements of the pioneer
strongly predominat ing.
Mr. Anglin was five times married, and
the father of a number of children. His first
wife was Rachel Wilson, a native of Virginia,
who died in Edgar county, Illinois, leaving
five children: Abram; William; John; Mary,
afterward the wife of Silas II. Bates; and
Margaret, now Mrs. John Moody. He was
then married, in Coles county, Illi ois, to
Catherine Duty, who bore him three children,
only one of whom reached maturity: Rebecca

Catherine, now the wife of Frauklin Coates,
of Utah Territory. His second wife died at
old Fort Houston, near Palestine, this State,
and he married the third time, at Tinnan's
Fort, Robertson county, Mrs. Orpha James.
They had eight children, only one of whom
is now living: Adeline, wife of Daniel Parker,
of Anderson county, rexas. His fourth
marriage occurred in Limestone county, to
Mrs. Nancy Faulkenberry, widow of David
Faulkenberry. His fifth wife was Mrs. Sarah
Chaffin, nee Crist, but by the last two unions
there were no children.
NEILL MCLENNAN, in honor of whom McLennan
county is named, was born in the
highlands of Scotland, in 1777, and emigrated
with two brothers and other relatives to the
State of North Carolina in 1801, where he
resided as a farmer until 1816. With a brave
and adventurous spirit, and with one companion,
he explored the wilds of Florida, and,
becoming satisfied with the country, remained
there until 1834. Ile had heard of Texas,
and with his two brothers and a few other
friends purchbaced a schooner at Pensacola,
loaded her with their goods and families,
navigated her themselves, and landed
safely at the mouth of the Brazos river
early in 1835. They proceeded up the
river and settled on Pond creek, near its
mouth, il what is now Falls county. While
there his two brothers were killed by the Indians,
Laughlin, one of the brothers, being
shot full of arrows. The family of the latter,
consisting of a wife and three small boys,
were captured and taken away. The mother,
who was living with him, was also killed, the
house was burned, and the wife and youngest
child died in captivity. The next boy was
bought, and the eldest remained with the
Indians until grown, when, by a treaty, his
uncle, Neil (not _Neill) McLennan, brought

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families, book, 1893; Chicago. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/m1/121/ocr/: accessed July 27, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .