Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 43, No. 213, Ed. 1 Sunday, January 14, 1940 Page: 4 of 18

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Any erroneous reflection upon the char,
acter, standing or reputation of any
psr6on, firm or corporation, which may
appear in any of The Reporter's publica-
tions will be cheerfully corrected upon be-
ing brought to attention of the publishers.
Editoriais-SWEETWATER REPORTER—Features
Published each afternoon except Saturday,
also Sunday morning and its weekly edition
PAGE FOUR
SWEETWATER, TEXAS
on Thursday by The Sweetwater Reporter,
Inc. Entered as second class matter at postr
office in Sweetwater, Texas, Feb. 9, 1920.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1940 George Bennitt and Russell' Bennitt, Pubs.
He that believeth and is baptized shall be sav-
ed; but he that believeth not shall be damned.—
St. Mark 16',16.
Remember that what you believe will depend
very much upon what you are.—Noah Porter.
0
AVIATION HAS A BIG YEAR;
SAFETY RECORD ESTABLISHED
It's as safe in an airliner these days as it is in a
baby's crib. Or at least it was during 1939, accord-
ing to a fistful of heartening statistics released by the
Air Transport Association of America.
Domestic airlines carried 1,400,000 persons over a total
of 620,000,000 passenger miles without even scratching
the nose of a single person. Col. Edgar S. Gorrell, president
of the Air Transport Association, was probably right when
he said this was the "greatest increase in safe travel of
any class of passenger service for any similar period in the
history of transportation in the United States."
• * *
The safety record becomes even more remarkable in
view of the fact that the number of passenger miles
flown both by domestic and international lines origi-
nating in this country increased from 635,000,000 in
1938 to 880,000,000 last year. Mail and express ship-
ments also increased, according to the report.
The increase in passenger travel is directly linked to
the enviable safety record set by commercial pilots, mech-
anics and all others who are responsible for the safe flight
of transport planes. ' The increased enthusiasm for air trav-
el enabled airline executives to dip into the black ink bottle
again for the first time in several years. For the past sev-
eral years, airlines have been operating at a net annual
loss of $2,000,000, Colonel Gorrell said.
* * *
It is also true that the confidence of the public in
air transportation is making it possible for airlines
to rely less on mail contracts and express business
and more on passenger services. Only five years ago,
about 70 per cent of the business handled by transport
ships included mail and express shipments, and passen-
ger service comprised only 30 per cent. Last year, 60
per cent of the commerce handled by commercial avia-
tion firms was in the form of human cargo.
While safety played a prime part in vitalizing pas-
senger business, the airline firms also bestow a certain
amount of deserved credit upon the smooth function-
ing of the Civil Aeronautics Act and on the Air Traf-
fic Conference which opened up a system of coordina-
tion among the various lines.
Aviation is still a growing industry. No one would con-
tend that it has reached the peak of its efficiency, the pin-
nacle of its ability to serve the public. Fifteen years ago
there was no scheduled passenger service. Twenty-five years
ago, most people still regarded the flying machine as some-
thing with which only a fool would play.
* # *
Yet, despite its comparative youth, aviation has
already set a record which no other mode of transpor-
tation can claim. There were airplane accidents in this
country in 1939. But they did not happen to the train-
ed pilots of the transport companies. The airlines have
proved that, given good equipment, and expert person-
nel, there need be no fear of accidents. It is the best
kind of publicity aviation can possibly get.
FEMININE NOVELIST
HORIZONTAL
1,5 Modern
novelist.
JO Dealer in
oils.
12 Bustle.
13 Foreign
matter forced
under the skin
14 Ovum.
16 Perches.
18 Papa.
19 Bone.
21 Novel.
22 Indefinite
article.
23 Humor.
25 Loud
merrymaking.
28 Dance step.
31 Vessel.
33 Wrinkles.
34 Currency.
35 Adhesive
substance
37 To growl.
39 Measure of
area.
41 Debt.
43 Frigid.
44 Credit.
45 Soft cap.
47 Maxim.
Answer to Previous Puzzle 24 Point.
THEjR
50 Witticism.
51 To stop up.
53 Seasons food.
54 Eccentric
wheel.
55 Vampire
57 Measure.
58 Morning
prayer.
60 Her novels
have made
popular
motion s.
61 Her native
land.
VERTICAL
2 Animal.
3 Insects' eggs.
4 Bitter drug.
5 Fraftce.
6 Organ of sight.
7 Sack.
8 Verbal
termination.
9 Gypsy.
11 To come in.
13 Her book
"——" made a
splendid play.
15 Donated.
17 Oppresses
with heat.
18 Vegetables.
20 Courtesy title.
26 To emulate.
27 Limb.
28 Chum.
29 While.
30 She also
writes
stories.
32 To wander
about.
34 To weep.
36 To dine.
38 To perform.
40 Semi-
diameters.
42 Asiatic tree.
44 Funny. ., •
46 Pressed
grape skins.
48 Comfort.
49 Heating
vessel
50 Chinese
sedge.
52 Encountered.
54 Auto.
55 Spain.
56 Chaos.
58 Myself.
59 North
America.
ZO HI
Outstanding Political Figure
NEA Service. Jne
Senator Vandenb erg Due To
Sound Farm Call In Speech
BY BRUCE CATTON
WASHINGTON — (NEA)
—Look for a challenging
discussion of the farm pro-
blem when Senator Van-
denburg speaks at the Lin-
coln's birthday rally in St.
Paul February 10.
Few people realize it, but
Vandenberg on his voting
record could run like a
house afire in the farm belt.
In the 73rd Congress he vot-
ed for a cost-of-production
farm bill and for the Fra-
zier-Lemke farm bankrupt-
cy bill.
In the 74th, he voted for
the Connolly "export boun-
ty" and export debenture
plans, and proposed an
amendment to the latter pro-
ON THE AIR WITH
-KXOX
-5^ f ^
SUNDAY'S PROGRAM
9:00—On the Mall.
9:15—Church Announcements.
9:30—Roby Quartet.
9:45—Salon Music.
—The Shepperds.
10:15—Ranch Boys.
10:30—Airs from Musical Shows.
10:45—The Dreamers.
11:00—Church of Christ.
13:00—Sclinsky String Quartet.
12:10—R&R Theatre Time.
12:15—Reggie Cliilds Orchestra.
12:30—Colorado Girls Trio —
Three Notes.
12:15—On with the Dance.
1:00—Church of Christ.
1:15—Ruth Duncan Graham,
Yiolinist.
1:30—Texas Hall of Fame.
2:00—Hit Parade.
COO—Aloha Land.
: :15—Conntry Quartette.
3:30—Board of City Develop-
ment.
4:00—Scurry County Ramblers.
4:15—Miss Althea Schriever,
Poems.
4:3ft—Vivian Delia Chiesa, So-
prano.
4:45—Concert Hall of the Air.
5:15—Swing Session.
":15—Twilight Hour.
H;00—Sign Off.
————o —
Governor to Name
Aeronautics Board
AUSTIN — (UP) — Gov. W.
Lee O'Dahiel will name a sev-
en-member advisory board to
act as a state agency to deal
with the civil aeronautics au-
thority in efforts to improve mu-
nicipal airports, he promised a
committee headed by J. Bryan
Miller of Wichita Falls. The Gov-
ernor's board can act until the
legislature creates an official
body members of the delegation
said. There were attendants
from Fort AVorth, Dallas, Hous-
ton. San Antonio. Corpus Chris-
tl, Beaumont, Abilene, Lubbock,
Brownsville, Midland, Austin,
Wichita Falls, Waco and Galves
ton.
viding for an embargo on
imports of all farm products
affected by the export deb-
enture.
In the 75th congress he
supported the McAdoo
amendment to the ever-nor-
mal granary bill, which
would have set up a farm
surplus corporation to store
and dispose of farm surplu-
ses and would have directed
the secretary of agriculture
to determine annual cost of
production price for farm
products.
On the farm angle, Van-
denberg's Lincoln's birth-
day speech will serve no-
tice on the east that he is
solidly in the farmer's cor-
ner.
Religion is Out
For Half U. S. Children
Approximately half of the
children in America re-
ceive no formal religious
education whatever; approxi-
mately a third of all Amer-
ican children are beyond
the reach of libraries; fam-
ilies of about one-fourth of
American children got pub-
lic relief of one kind or an-
other during the past de-
cade . . . These are high-
lights from reports which
will be presented at the
White House Conference on
Children in a Democracy,
which meets January 18-20.
DEPARTMENT
OF MIND-CHANGING
Keep a few grains of salt
handy for the day-to-day
stories telling how FDR fa-
vors this, that or the other
man as his successor. These
stories are only temporarily
true, so to speak; all sched-
ules subject to change with-
out notice.
Trick is to let the adher-
ents of a given candidate
spread the crown-prince
story without denying it,
for a while; then to shut it
off and let someone else
have a turn. First, McNutt
was publicized as the fair-
haired boy. Then Ickes
blew that one up, and now
Hull is getting the play.
Week after next it is as
likely as not to be someone
else.
Point to remember is that
until FDR names his choice
publicly, he can always
change his mind—and prob-
ably will. Advantage of the
stunt is that it gives each
man a chance to send up a
trial balloon and see how the
public reacts to it. Beyond
that, it .neans nothing.
NEW DEAL STEAMS
UP FOR HULL PROGRAM
Some of the most high-
powered politics of recent
years is going to be seen
in connection with the ad-
ministration's drive to get
the Hull reciprocal trade
agreements law extended
this winter.
Hull's suddenly-blossom-
ing presidential boom stands
or falls on the outcome of
this fight: Hull is aces with
Roosevelt and Farley.
Latest report is that AAA
men in the farm belt are
working nobly to develop a
"grass roots reaction" in fa-
vor of the program.
TOWY'S
SPAGHETTI
HOuSEr
COM 1940 BY NIA fUVICl. INC. T. M. KIC U. 1 AT. OM. )
"Here, here! Thai's no way lo serve meal balls!"
FLYING WITH
WILLIAMS
BY MAJOR AL WILLIAMS
At first glance it might, seem
strange that the Germans should
bother bombing the Shetland
Islands. A little investigation,
however, discloses strategical
reasons of great importance.
The Shetland Islands are'a lit-
tle group northeast of the Ork-
neys, and are known for their
wool, ponies and dogs. In war
they serve as outlying bases for
patrolling warships and flying
boats. The stretch of open wat-
er from the easternmost corner
of the Shetland Islands to Nor-
way is a marine highway, about
200 miles wide. This is the top of
the North Sea and the highway
along which German blockade
runners must travel to and
from the Atlantic.
During the World War, this
entire highway was plugged
with thousands of mines, most
of which were planted by the
American Navy. Whether or not
this mine barrier has been re-
built is not divulged. Along with
their other problems, it is un-
likely that the British have had
time to attend to this gigantic
job.
At any rate, we know that
British warships are patrolling
from the Shetlands to Norway
for slinking enemy merchant-
men. And since a single aircratt
can out-search a dozen warships,
the British have established an
aerial patrol over this area, and
flying boats are based on the
Shetland Islands.
As an arm of the British block-
ade of the North Sea, this aerial
patrol is a most effective wea-
pon. With only one or two excep-
tions, merchantmen are no
match for the 35-mile-an-hour-
light cruisers. A light wisp of
smoke on the horizon may mean
a few hours chase by a warship,
but it's only a twelve-minute job
for a flying boat.
o———
Four Persons Die
As Plane Crashes
CASEY, 111. — (UP) — Four
persons were killed when a
chartered airplane flying west-
ward from Detroit crashed in a
boggy cornfield, exploded and
burned. Three of the dead were
members of a Detroit family who
were going to Phoenix, Ariz., for
their health.
The identified dead were Mrs.
Mary Boroqviez; her daughter,
Joanna, 17, and a son, Leonard,
10. The pilot of the four-passeng-
er monoplane was William B.
Maycock, 43, commercial pilot
of Detroit.
CLASSIFIED ADS
One insertion 10c a line, 3 line or 30c minimum. Capital Letter
Lines, double rates. Special rates for more than 2 days. Card of
Thanks 10c per line. All classified ads payable in advance or after
first insertion. Display classifieds 50c column inch.
■Closing Hours; Week days 1 p. m.—Saturdays 4 p. m.
CLASSIFIED DEPT. DIAL 078
1. Special Notices
AH laundry, washed and dried,
3c lb. Finshed work by the
piece. We pick up and deliv-
er. Help-UR-Self Laundry, 300
Ash.
WHO will support tne Old Man
YOU
are Going to be?
I can show you how to create
a $10,000 ESTATE out of cur-
rent income to take care of your
old age.
JOE H. BOOTHE, Representa-
tive, Southwestern Life Insur-
ance Company.
MADAM ANNA gives advice in
all affairs of life. 10 a. m. to 9
p. m. Camp Joy.
Male, Instruction. Men to take
up Air Conditioning and Elec-
tric Refrigeration and better
themselves. Must be mechan-
ically inclined, willing to train
in spare time to qualify. Write.
Utilities Inst., No. 800, care
Reporter.
4. For Rent Houses
NeAvly decorated fumisher'j
house, Dial 2727.
House, close in, newly painted
inside and out, desirable. 900
Oak street.
Nicely furnished or unfurnished
5 room house, close in, phone
480.
New three room House, with
bath. See R. C. Taylor, 202 E.
Bdwy. •
7 Help Wanted
2 F'or Rent Room9
One unfurnished room for rent.
703 W. 7th Street.
Furnished front upstairs bed-
room with or without board.
Gentlemen preferred. Dial 480.
Room and Board $1 per day.
Meals 25c by the week. Close
in. 303 E. Broadway. Phone
780.
For Rent: Bed room with or
without private bath and gar-
age. Mrs. Bertha Wade. 607
W. 3rd street.
Rooms and meals, 506 Locust;
large room for single; one
room for gentleman. Phone
2598.
WANTED— Man with car.
Route experience preferred
but not necessary. Rawleigh's
Dept. TXA-720-M, Memphis,
Tenn.
Good Watkins route open now in
section of Sweetwtaer. No car
or experience necessary; Wat-1
kins Company largest and
best known and products eas-
iest sold; usual earnings $20
to $35 a week. Write J. R.
WATKINS Co., 79-OG W. Iowa
Ave., Memphis, Tenn.
$15 weekly easily earned bv
thousands of women showing
new 1940 Spring Fashion
Frocks. No canvassing. No in-
vestment. Your own dresses'?
FREE. Send age and dress
size. FASHION FROCKS,
Dept. T-3384, Cincinnati, O.
8. Situation Wanted
Unencumbered widow wants
work in motherless home or
for aged couple. Apply 001 W.
4th Street.
3. For Kent Apartments
4 room apartment, furnished,
406 E. Bdwy., Dial 3286. 9. Real Estate For Sale
Stenographic, bookkeeping or
secretarial work. Good refer-
ences, Houston two years. Con-
sider part or full time position.
Box 50, care Reporter.
3 room nicely furnished apt.,
private bath and garage, 1203
Elm.
PETITION—
(Continued from page 1)
sioners Monday morning:
"To the eommisisoners' court
of Nolan county:
"We, the undersigned citizens
and business men of Sweetwat-
er, respectfully request that the
plan to provide additional park-
ing space by the construction
of a roadway within the present
courthouse yard be given the
utmost consideration. We be-
lieve that this will provide
enough space that the conges-
tion that is now so acute will be
materially relieved and will be
of benefit not only to us but to
all who come to Sweetwater:
"T. T. MeCord, F. W. Wool-
worth company, by L. D. Shiner;
B. Daniel of D & D Cafe, G. W.
Whitaker bakery, H. H. Hawley,
grocery; Seal's, Roebuck and Co.;
Sam L. Glass, Sweetwater Re-
porter, by George Bennitt;
Sweetwater Local Mutual Life
association, Roy W. Thompson.
Dan G. Shields, Leader store, by
S. D. Saied; J. P. Majors, Cox
Jewelry, by ,J. R. Cox Jr.; K. M.
Sobe, and M. J. Vaughn.
"Baucum Implement and Sup-
ply company, by Walter Bau-
cum; L. L. Armor, Cowen's Shoe
store, L. B. Allen, Jr., Catching
Drug, W. A. Corbett, Glenn
Russell, Young's pharmacy, C.
W. Breeding, H. E. Polk, C. B.
Williams, Luther M. Watson,
and Roy Mathews.
"Levy Brothers, by Irving
Loeb, H. A. Walker, Saied de-
partment store, York store, b3'
Roy C. Terrell, manager; Joe
Bowen, Elrod furniture, D. A.
Clark, Willis studio, by M. D.
Willis; Texas Bank & Trust
company, by G. A. Swaim; Jim
Butler, J. M. Shade, Roy Rasco,
and Tansil's, by H. A. Tansll."
o
Dr. Dann Attending
Meeting at Austin
Dr. E. A. Dann, a director of
the Texas State Chiropractic as-
sociation, is in Austin this week-
end attending business confer-
ence of the executives. Ho is re-
turning late Sunday.
3 room unfurnished apt. 511
Bowie St.
2 room furnished apt., electric
refrigerator, utilities paid, dial
2735, 901 Lamar Street.
2 or 3 room furnished apart-
ment. 110 Bowie street.
Three room furnished apt., with
garage, utilities paid, 1201 Sam
Houston.
Apartments at 900 Walnut.
Furnished two room apartment
for rent, $18 per month, bills
paid. 1106 Pine.
Furnished apartment, G. E. re-
frigerator, private bath. South
exposure, adults, Dial 2420,
906 Locust.
3 room furnished apartment.
Dial 2971.
3 room furnished apartment,
close in, electric refrigerator,
dial 3239 or 628.
For rent, 4 room furnished apart
ment .406 East Broadway. One
bedroom for rent.
For Sale or Lease: Produce build-
ing, corner Sam Houston and
Santa Fe tracks, Sweetwater,
apply to Western Produce
Division, Wilson & Co., Abi- *
lene, Tex.
For Sale: 4 room house, 2 lots,
well improved, H. E. Green-
haw, 700 Lubbock.
LIQUIDATION
1IOLC properties offered on pay-
ments less than rent.
406 E. Ave "C", mo payment
$12.39.
805 Pease Street, mo. payment •
$8.61.
301 E. Texas St., mo. pay-
ment $9.27.
711 W. 4th st„ mo. payment
$19.62. '
110 Orange St.. mo. payment
$30.98.
If interested in owning a
home see—
A. S. Kendrick
310 Oak Street
13. For Sale Misc.
FOR RENT: F urnished apar*
ments, phone 484.
WANTED—Clean cotton rags,
Sweetwater Reporter press-
room.
POLITICAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The following candidates
have authorized The Sweet-
water Reporter to announce
their candidacy for office,
subject to the action of the
democratic primary July
27, 1910:
For Peace Justice
Precinct No. 1
S. H. SHOOK (re-election.)
For County Treasurer:
MRS. G. W. (Jack) COCH-
RAN (re-election)
MRS. S. N. LEACH
For District Clerk:
MRS. MYRTLE ROBERT-
SON (re-election)
For Sheriff
TOM WADE (re-election)
For Assessor-Collector: .
RAYMOND BISHOP
(Re-election)
For County .fudge:
CHARLES W. LEWIS
(Re-election)
For County Attorney:
ERNEST L. DUNCAN
(Re-election)
For County Clerk:
L. W. (Dock) SCOTT
(Re-election)
For Commissioner:
Precinct No. 1
MELVIN THOMPSON
(Re-election)
Precinct No. 2 ,
R. L. WITT
(Re-election)
W. R. (Buck) JOHNSON,
Will sell at discount, $268. de-
posit on 1940 Hudson 41 se-
dan. DeLuxe a c c e ssories,
Choice of color. Box 207, care
Reporter.
For Sale: Choice Nortex seed
oats, S. Edwards Grain Co.
110 W. Ave. A.
Second hand
Gainer.
pipe.
See Bill '^
For Sale, 3000 bundles hegari,
600 bales sudan. K. I?. Perry,
Roscoe, Route 2 (mi. south. 1
Reduced prices on typeyriters
and adding machines all this
week. Some real bargains,
Mrs. McCaulley, Blue Bonnet
Hotel building.
Taxi Business for Sale: 2 cars, v
good condition, no references
required, dial 2272, Buck
Johnson.
FOR SALE OF TRADE
1939 Dodge 1 1-2 ton short wheel
base truck, 22 ft. Hobbs trail-
er, been driven 7000 miles. A
bargain. Murchison - Cramer
Motor Co., phone 3114.
FOR HALE OR TRADE 4
1939 Dodge DeLuxe 4 door se-
dan, 24000 miles, looks and op-
erates like new. A real buy.
Murchison-Cramer Motor Co-
Phone 3114.
1937 Dodge 1-2 ton pickup, per-
fect condition. A real bargain.
Murchison-Cramer Motor Co.,
Phone 3114.
16. Lost and Found
Lost: Brlndle bull dog, named
"Booger", reward. Phone 217*.
210 Lamar St.
FOR MALK OR TRADE
1939 Dodge special coupe, low
mileage. You have to see this
car to appreciate it. Murcrii- ,
son-Cramer Motor Co., Phone
3114. '<?
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Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 43, No. 213, Ed. 1 Sunday, January 14, 1940, newspaper, January 14, 1940; Sweetwater, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth310171/m1/4/ocr/: accessed May 25, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Sweetwater/Nolan County City-County Library.

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