The Galveston Daily News. (Galveston, Tex.), Vol. 39, No. 129, Ed. 1 Friday, August 20, 1880 Page: 2 of 4

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Galveton. Texas, January 1,1880.
Branch Offices of the News.
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site Postoffice. Preston stree*.
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store of C. F. Stephens, 513 Main str< et.
scrupulous in their practice than pettifog-
gers and shysters, but these are, fortunately,
not numerous, and their course is referable
to dishonesty in ethics, and not to the pres-
sure of necessity. It is a principle recog-
u*zed m 1 civilized countries, where jus-
tice is administered in accordance with rules
previously promulgated, that none should
be employed to assist in lesralicontroversies
who are not thoroughly familiar with those
rules. This principle is sadly short of
regular and consistent enforcement in the
United States. In England before a lawyer
can be admitted to practice in the circuit
courts he must give evidence of erudition
and proficiency. As a consequence legiti-
mate and honorable success awaits legal
ability, and the profession is conspicuous
for the absence of pettifoggers and
shysters. Ths faculty of law in this coun-
try is unfortunate above all others in not
having suitable protection against quacks,
and in this regard society more than the
faculty is to be pitied. In Texas, for in
stance, where positions on the bench are
elective, what assurance have the public
that oue of these pettifoggers, having
wormed himself through a nominating con
vention, or ingratiated himself with some
sinister element but important factor at
an election, will not be chosen to preside
over the lives and property of the people in
almost any judicial district? Indeed, it is
not to the credit of the American bar, exer-
cising as it does a large influence in legisla
tion, that our standard of ethics,
learning and training in the legal
: profession has fallen "so far below that
! of England, France, and even Mexi
co. In criminal practice, especially,
ability to plead understandingly and honor
ably, to plead in the spirit of a sworn and
apable minister of law and of justice,
should exist not only in theory, but in fact,
purpose, in conscience. Hence it is very
questionable if pleading against the state
for a private fee is not essentially calculated
to taint the administration of criminal jus-
tice. It would certainly exalt the adminis-
tration of criminal justice if the state paid
at a reasonable rate counsel for defense as
ell as for prosecution, and if no member
of the bar, as an officer of court, were
allowed to accept private compensation on
either side in a criminal case. The poorest
culprit would tlicu stand before the law and
its tribunals on an equal footing with the
wealthiest; the purse of private revenge,
burning to see punishment inflicted, or of
private fear, desperately intent upon elud-
ing punishment, could then count for noth-
and even-handed justice, uncomplicated
with any extraneous ingredient, might then
be reasonably expected.
Friday, August 20, lSfO.
THE LYNCHING BUSINESS.
The lynching of a negro near Brenham is
probably another item of news that some
misguided people think ought to be either
entirely suppressed, or else so covered up
and distorted as to make it appear perfectly
justifiable under the circumstances. It is
the opinion of the News that the brightest
possible light should be thrown on this dis-
graceful affair, to the end that the perpetra-
tors, who are far greater sinners against the
laws' of God and man, and far worse
enemies to society and civil order, than the
lynched negro was, may be brought to jus
tice, or exposed to withering execration. As
far as present evidence in this matter goes,
it is pretty clear that there is not a mitiga-
ting circumstance. If the negro had com-
mitted rape on a white woman, as did Field,
vhora Gov. Roberts took under his guber
fcatorial wing, then perhaps the dread of a
Similar abuse of executive clemency
night have been pleaded as an exten-
uating consideration. If the negro were a
wealthy malefactor, like Rothschild, and
had brought his victim to Texas for the
special purpose of slaughter, believing that
lie could baffle justice in the courts and
come out with ultimate impunity, then per-
haps lynching would have been divested of
pome of its horrible features. If the negro
were simply a murderer, with friends
and plenty of money with which
to procure bail when the matter had
blown over,. as in the case of one of
the murderers of Dr. Brazell, of D
Witt, county, then the lynchers or their
backers could give a poor excuse at least for
their conduct: but in this instance of lynch
ing no such palliation can be discovered.
There was no ground for apprehending
that prosecution would miscarry in the low
er court. There was no danger of the higher
court finding a misspelled word in the in
dictment. There was no reason to suppose
that Gov. Roberts w.ould interfere with the
execution of the law and deprive the lessees
of the penitentiary of the labor of an able-
bodied convict. In a word, any poor man
be he white, red, black or yellow, may rest
perfectly assured of being punished for
stealing stock. The penalty for theft isim
prisonment. not death, and the men who,
trampling upon the state in its tribunals, and
break into the bloody house of life, should
be made to feel that there is, nevertheless,
power in the commonwealth of Texas that
can reach and punish tliem. It is, how
ever, not to be wondered at that the lawless
and the law-defying should become bolder
when there are laws on the statute book no
toriously recognized as dead letters, though
of recent enactment, and when we have a
criminal jurisprudence and an executive
system which have furnished scarcely a le
gend or tradition of a gang of lynchers
however atrocious and scandalous, in outrage
upon the peace and dignity of the state, hav
ing been visited with condign retribution by
the arm of the state clothed with the awful
majesty of the law. Let no one mistake
the nature and the significance of this evil
In all this lynching business it is Texas that
suffers violence, humiliation, defilement,
is Texas that is crucified.
COFFEE CULTURE IN THE UNITED
STATES.
Commissioner Le Due has convinced him-
self that coffee can be raised in Florida. A
letter has been published in the New York
Evangelist, written from Savasota, Florida,
by Mr. C. E. Abe!, in which he says he has
watched the growth of the coffee tree with
much interest. He had sent to commissioner
Le Due several blossoms, and had exhibited
branches broken from the tree heavily laden
with coffee beans. This successful effort
was made by a lady, and Mr. Abel says her
coffee trees now bear a crop of maturing
fruit, and are literally loaded with
blossoms and the young fruit of an-
other crop. The gentleman adds the
remark, which will not be disputed, that
there are many places on this coast where
the same pluck, energy and industry ex
ibited by this lady will not only
make coffee-raising a success, but many
others of the delicious semi-tropi-
cal fruits." There is no reason why
coffee should not flourish in Florida
and in portions of Texas as well as in
Arabia, the West Indies and some of the
Pacific islands, where the conditions are no
more favorable for its growth than in some
places in this country. It thrives wherever
frost does not blight and where the soil is
not extremely retentive of rain. In Ama-
zonian regions, where the soil and climate
are not dissimilar to those of
Florida and portions of Texa;
with moderate care a coffee plantation will
yield two crops annually. In fact, the best
coffee of commerce, that grown in Arabia,
aised from soil bearing a close resem-
blance to much of that of the peninsula of
Florida. The experience of the enterprising
Flordian lady shows a result equal to any
attained in Arabia in the Mocha plantations,
he having, in less than two years, succeeded
in securing blooming trees from the seed.
With this experience there is but little
doubt that, with the exercise of characteristic
American enprgy in experimetal enterprise,
the coffee plant in the near future may be
seen in certain regions of this country, as in
the province of Para, growing in almost
every roadside thicket or waste.
THE LEGAL PROFESSION AND CRIMINAL
JUSTICE.
At the annual meeting of the bar associa-
tion, now being held at Saratoga spriDgs,
final action is to be had on the resolutions
recommended by the committee on legal
education and admission to tiie bar. The
first of these resolutions looks to the admis-
sion as practitioners of law in the courts of
all other state- those who have practiced
for three years in the highest courts of the
state of which ;h<»y are citizens. The sec
ond provides 111. i a diploma, granted by
law-school havi: , k-ast four well-paid and
- :all be essential as
practicing law. The
endance on certain
id exercises appointed
■ :> course as
..initiation to be admitted
igh time that a movement
should be made with the view of raising
the standard ot the legal profession in this
country. While no person should be ad
mitted to practice law without being tho
roughly prepared by study and training, it is
unfortunately true that too often about the
only qualification necessary for admission
to practice in the lower courts is plenty of
brisk presumption to cover lack of both
learning and training. This class of prac
titiouersi have to rely for their success upon
pettifogging devices and shameless trickery,
most of them soliciting business, and espe-
cially the defense of persons accused of
crime, with the hope of defeating the ends
of justice by a course of defense in its in
wardness degrading to the profession. It
not to be disguised that lawyers of eminent
ab ility are sometimes met who are not more
efficient teachc
qualification i
third require
specified stu .
for a tin-
qualification .
to the bar.
ii
to the nomination of officers before the adop-
tion of c. platform, the San Antonio Express
remarks:
The loss amounted to nothing, as the minority
were not looking for bolting opportunities. About
the greatest thing the minority were looking for
and failed to find wbs respectful hearing and treat-
ment at the hands of the majority. There were
plenty of opportunities to bolt presented. It was
the lack of disposition and not opportunity that
prevented it.
The Stephensville North-West Texan finds
consolation in remarking:
The progressive democracy, it is true, failed to
defeat Roberts, but there is "no getting around the
fact that it converted him on the school question.
But adds:
Th» free school democrats committed a great
blunder in not bringing out a standard-bearer who
was well known in the state. It is not a gi-od iu- a,
any way, for the people to choose a ruler only irom
the list of candidates who have the cheek to thrust
themselves forward for preferment.
The N. W. Texan prints the picture of an
owl instead of a crow over the announcement
of the nomination of tho old alcalde.
Mh G. B. Loving, editor of the Texas Live
Stock Journal, is afflicted with sore eyes to
such an extent as to prevent him from attend-
ing to his labors.
The Austin Dispatch (republican) says:
There is no longer any doubt that Gen. J. P. Rob-
ert son will become a candidate for governor if he
can secure the nomination of the united opposi-
tion, of which we have no doubt
The Waco Telephone sees too much of " I
am the state*' in the old alcalde. It says the
platform adopted at Dallas is but an insignifi-
cant factor in the coming contest.
It was framed to suit the candidate, and its re-
ception throughout the state has been almost con-
temptuous. The people and the politicians do not
look to the platform as an indication of what fu-
ture stale policy is going to oe. They look to Gov
Roberts. He is the parry, the govertment, the
state. One-mau government was never more
nearly illustrated in this country than in the. per-
son and administration of Gov. Roberts. The
platform is but a baggatelle and the politicians who
revolve around the governor are unimportant
satellites.
A large number of editors were members of
the late democratic state convention. Some of
them, the Roberts men, take pride in the pro-
ceedings; others, who opposed the o. a. saw lit-
tle, except the action of the minority, to com-
mend ; and still others took* a middle view of
things. Among these last was the editor of
the Van Zandt Chronicle, who writes:
Like all similar conventions, it had its proportion
of wise men, egotists, clowns, common sense men,
business men. idiots and yahoos, tlie latter, if we
may judge from the noise they inadePWere largely
in the majority.
The Houston Age now openly takes its stand
as the power behind the throne, so to say; or
at least it takes the responsibility from the
shoulders of the governor in this:
Governor Roberts not only had no " slate," but
w ■ could not find that he had any preference
among the candidates for th_* different positions.
When the canvass for the nominations first opened,
we sugges.ed that tiie Hon. L. J. Storey, of Cald-
well county, had ma le a g«>od record in the senate
of the sixteenth legislature; and that lie was evi-
dently a m in of correct views of state policy: and
that, as the nomination of Roberts from the east,
for governor was about as certain as anything in
the future could weiJ be, there would be a peculiar
propriety in the nomination of Storey, from the
west, for lieutenant governor. That cxrcumstasre
being afrerward mentioned in a conversation with
the governor, he said Storey was a good man. and
would make a good presiding orflcer of the senate:
and that is tho only instance in which we ever
heard him express an opinion as to the merits of
any candidate for a democratic nomination whose
name was likely to be before the state convention.
At the rate at which the editor of the Age is
growing he will soon be "a biger man" than
the old alcalde. He now bears a peacocks
feather in his broadbrim, and steps like Henry
of Navarre. Beware of pride. Lucifer got
the high fall for indulging too much in that
extravagance. Imitate the modesty and sim-
plicity of manners for which the old alcalde is
famous.
The Sherman Chronicle keeps up the war on
judge Bledsoe, who is a candidate, on account
of his imputed infidelity:
He makes a guarded and equivocal declaration of
belief that there is a Supreme Being. If he means
that he believes in a God, the creator and ruler of
the universe, it will greatly surprise those to whom
he has taueht the doctrine of evolution and ma-
terialism. and will equally surprise those who hold
the same faith, and with whom he has acted.
Are we to have a question between religion
and science in Texas politics, in spite of the
inhibition of religious tests by the national and
state constitutions? Something of thp kind is
again agitating France, and even extending to
England, where the Bradlaugh case has given
rise to a general discussion of the subject, and
led to a somewhat aggressive war on the estab-
lished church and the political connection be-
tween church and state. The St. James Gazette,
iu a somewhat apologetic way, remarks on the
fact that there is scarcely a nation in Europe
in which there is not a controversy of this kind,
on which political parties are divided. In
France and Belgium the issue is between the
laymen and protestants on the one side and the
catholic church on the other. In England, the
Gazette, referring to the late debates, says, " it
is surely obvious that the next great question
to arise will be the disestablishment of the
church." The friends of the establishment are
more moderate and conciliatory than some of
our American polemics. One of them says:
There is not the kind of opposition between the
church and the world, between tne church and the
. tate. between the city of God and the atheistical
republic, which might be supposed. The fact is
that two authorities, two schools, two sets of teach-
ers are competing for the minds of the same por-
tion of mankind. As has been strongly said of
church and state in England -one authority says:
" If 3*ou do or don't do this or that you shall be
hanged:" another says: "If you don't behave in a
particular way you shall be damned." The ques-
tion for statesmen in the position of the French re-
publican govei nniemt is, which of these sanctions is
gaining on the < therv Manifestly, it js the civil
sanction. Life in all western countries is getting
to be less and less regulated by posthumous penal-
ties affixed to breach of rules.
It is with the former that Texas judges are
supposed to deal.
SPIRIT OF THE GERMAN PRESS.
[From the San Antonio Freie Presse—translated for
the News. J
STATE PRESS,
Wiiat tlie Interior Papers Say.
The Dallas Herald says:
When Mr. Walsh was nominated by the conven-
tion for land commissioner he was called upon for
a speech, and responded in a few remarks. During
the course of those remarks lie gave expression to
words unfit for " ears polite," especially unfit for
the ears of ladies, a number of whom were pre-
sent.
The Sherman Chronicle says:
If such i6 the case we invite Walsh to step down
and out of his position.
The Houston Age, the seaport organ of the
old alcalde, is to come out in a new dress.
The Post teases the slow-going merchants of
Houston Dy saying:
A private letter assures us that the fall business
has opened already in Galveston with qu.te a
boom. The grocery houses are especially busy,
and unusual activity for this season of tlie year
marks the Strand. Hear ye that, Houstonians'.
Are vou not seeing the sand lotters and goiner them
better?
The Houston Post, an independent journal,
that speaks without party bias, says:
The time has passed when the obscure char-
acter of the greenbackers in Texas ad-
mitted of neglect or a sneer. The party has steadi-
ly increased in numbers and infiu nee,"until now it
commands respect by its political weight and by
the worthy character of its constituent elemen*..
We can readily understand how that very excel-
lent citizens, with no particular political bias or
ambition, may be persuaded that the restrictions
laid upon the medium of exchange are the cause
of many of the evils under which the community
is suffering, and that by inducing the government
to issue a heavier volume of currency, much of
this load will be lifted and a new impulse imparted
to trade and general economy. There is much to
say on both sines of this question, and with such
evident differenc prevailing throughout the union,
it is gratuitous to make the greenback party ob-
noxious to any special charge^n the premises. In
certain sections of the union the greenback party
has emerged from obscurity and is boldlv con-
tending for place and power. In Texas the "ranks
of the greenbackers are made up by accessions
from both great parties, and many independents
fight their battle as volunteers in their ranks.
The Austin Statesman appears to merge all
state issues in national politics, and to think
that there is something in the name of democ-
racy that should be the touch stone on all
questions, whether state or national. It quotes
the Fort Worth Advance as authority for the
statement that an "overwhelming majority of
the citizens of Texas have indicated Hon. O.
M. Roberts as the man for governor, and every
democrat in the state should either say amen,
or take in the sign of 'democrat.'" The
Statesman proclaims its own readiness to be
cut off as a political heretic, even in local is-
sues, as follows:
The Statesman has the highest concern for the
success of the democratic party, but if in his
freat wisdom our county chairman does really
now that it is in the way of democratic success,
he should brush it out of the way, and supplant it
with a sure enough democratic sheet.
The Waco Examiner, which was a Lang
paper, and pitched into the old alcalde with
the rest, now, without having professed re-
pentance, takes a seat on the amen bench, and,
with an air of self-righteousness, remarks:
We are glad to see the anti-Roberts papers on the
mourner's bench. Repentence even at tne eleventh
hour is wholesome to the soul. But remember,
gentlemen, not to expect too much. Our party is
not aocustomed to make deacons and elders out of
new converts. Be good and faithful, and. by the
time for a third term, you will be entitled to—to
hold eur hat while we are running the convention.
The Waco Examiner ridicules Lieut. Gov.
Sayers for joining the love-feast that followed
the nominalion of Roberts at Waco.
The Brenham Sentinel defends Seth Shepard
from the charge of having aided in the defeat
of John Hancock for congress two years ago,
and says:
At the nominating convention here in 1378, when
the convention had reached the seventh ballot,
Shepard being then at his law office in this city,
came into the presence of the convention and the
large audience, and in a most graceful and mag-
nanimous manner withdrew from the race, though
no other competitor was in the field than Hancock,
and when he knew that such a withdrawal would
necessarily elect Hancock.
The Castroville Quill fillips the fingers of the
majority of the Texas politicians as follows:
The cl i ?f claim put forth for Gov. Roberts, and
the one tne people seem to bank the most on, is, he
is honest. This is a somewhat humiliating com-
mentary upon the large army of other Texas states-
men.
In reply to the remark of the Houston Post,
that the minority in the state convention lost
their opportunity to bolt when they submitted
The action of the Dallas convention
nothing more nor less than an indorsement of
the disgraceful misrule of the past two years.
The democratic platform is simply an expre -
sion of the views and the opinions of the o d
alcalde—nothing more. No reference is mac e
to the b'-'"-punch or the Sunday law. The o. a.
will see that they are re-enacted and more
strictly enforced. The free schools will remain
as they are, or rather as they are not. Per-
haps, if there is anything left over they will get
it. The accusation that the democracy is
hostile to immigration i& denied. Possibly im-
migration is hostile to the democracy, but it
all amounts to the same in the end. AVe will
receive no immigration if the democracy can
prevent it.
Referring in another column to the Dallas
platform, the Freie Presse says:
The platform patched together at Dallas is
more remarkable for what it does not contain
than for what it does. It has evidently been
fixed up under the supervision of the old al-
calde himself. If the delegates at the conven-
Where, O,! where, are the time-honored
rinciples of the democracy? In 1866
ohn Ireland said in the reconstruction con-
vention that be would not touch a union man
with a forty-foot pole—or, maybe, it was only
a twenty foot pole—for fear he might become
soiled, probably; but now he is hugging to his
democratic heart a yankee general! Oh, these
poor, time-honored principles of the democ-
racy! How they have to suffer every once in
a while! The union general Hancock heads
the national democratic ticket, but on the
Texas state ticket there is not a single man
who ever attempted to make peace with the
union. Under the circumstances, it was highly
proper for the democracy to be silent about the
time-honored principles, and to dodge behind
the principles of the Cincinnati convention.
Compulsory Education.
ITo the News.l
There are two classes of persons for whom
this article is not written. The first is incapa-
ble of thinking of anything new; the second
never thinks at all, trusting ail matters to their
church and party.
Modern society, through the forms of gov-
ernment, assumes the duty of protecting the
life and rights of all its members, from con-
ception until dissolution. The unborn child is
guarded from criminal abortion and the un-
fortunate pauper provided with a quiet grave
by law. beveral states require the courts to
assume control of children whose parents fail
to provide them with sufficient food, clothing
and shelter to preserve their health and life.
The courts treat such children as wards of so-
ciety, and provide them with guardians who
are required to provide for them and send them
to school a reasonable portion of their time:
or the state provides homos for them in public
institutions managed by the state or by corpora-
tions. Both humanity and religion approve cf
such measures A pferent under no circuin
stances is allowed to injure his child permr-
nently in life or limb, no matter what are h s
peculiar notions. The mother who destroyed
her infant's eves so hs to use it to awaken sym-
pathy and secure alms was promptly sent to
the penitentiary, and no one doubted the
righteousness of the verdict. The mind is the
foundation of all human responsibility. Prove
insanity or idiotcy, and the criminal is acquit-
ted, no matter how revolting the offense. Ex-
ercise is essential to physical and mental
health. Swathe a child and keep it
in a cradle until its majority,
and it will be permanently dwarfed and dis
eased, and. in addition to those evils, wi 1
probably be an idiot. The remarkable story f
Kasper" Hauser, and his incarceration in a
dungeon irom infancy uiftil sixteen years cf
age by unknown, interested and inhuman par-
ties, moved the indignation of so staid a people
as the Germans, ana called forth extraordina: y
"efforts for the apprehension of the villains.
The present German law in regard to offenses
against the mind was enacted in consequence,
and may be traced as one of the causes which
led to the compulsory education measures of
that country. Tiie consequence is that scarce-
ly a German pauper can be found who can
not read and write. It is a grand record for a
nation, and it is little wonder they are amongst j
our best citizens—law-abiding and thri'ty. > e
doubt if the unnatural mother who destroyed
her child's eyes caused more human suffering
than the parent who, through ignorance, sel-
fishness, or worthlessness, neglects the mental
enlightenment of his child and sends him out
to grope through the world in the blindness of
ignorance. Experience proves that the body
and the mind should be fed and exercised to-
gether ; to neglect either is to unfit the child
lor useful life and citizenship. The widespread
ignorance, worthlessness, vice and crime which
heap upon society burdens too grievous to be
borne, rest largely with parents who neglect to
train their effspring. '' Travel improves the
apprehension of a fool." It is equally true
that the instructions of a qualified teacher,
with true ideas of life, awakens the mind of
the young to live lives of intelligence and in-
dustry. and saves them from becoming re-
cru.ts lor the dangerous classes of society. Sta-
tistics demonstrate that ignorance and intoxi
eating liquors furnish the greater part
of our criminals and paupers. Fully
one third of the convicts of our peni-
tentiaries do not know the alphabet,
and one-half can not write their names.
The ideal of manhood must be very low in
such persons, and it is little wonder that the
disgrace and ignominy of a life of crime and
imprisonment is not realized, consequently the
law has little or no terror—in fact, some seem
to prefer prison life to freedom. To have
schools free for all and to compel the attend-
ance of all children between six and sixteen
years, is the duty of the hour. Because other
ages and other places have permitted parents
to rear brutal, ignorant chilaren and to plague
society with them, is no more an excuse than
to plead that because parents in China are
permitted to dwarf and deform the feet of
their daughters, it should be allowed in Ameri-
ca. False economy will oppose this greatly
needed reformation. But when we recollect
that all our material good is held by us in trust
for the children of the present—the men of the
next generation, it seems proper to now begin
to disburse it for their benefit—their highest
good. If a war existed between us and Mexico
and an army was to be mustered to defeud our
state from invasion, and our homes from being
sacked, we would not hesitate to buy the most
expensive weapons for our soldiers. Suppose
some old fogy should recommend that we arm
our sons and brothers with old muskets of the
pattern of 1812, and hickory clubs, and would
cite the glorious victory of New Orleans as
proof of his correctness, and begin to whine
about the cost, would we listen to him for a
moment? Such weapons will not do in this age
of Rodman cannon and Winchester rifles, we
would answer, no matter how well they may
have served the country in the past. For to
send out boys and girls without correct ideas of
life, its business and duties, in this age, is sim-
ply to invite their defeat, ruin and death. Those
men who now stand in the way of free schools
and prate about their cost, less than twenty
years ago when not naif the dangers connect-
ed with popular ignorance menaced us were
willing to pour out life and money like water.
There were no apprehensions about spending
the balance in the treasury nor issuing new
bonds then. Now, when liberty, virtue, man-
hood, and the very nation's life is ready to
fall before the tide of ignorance, they falter,
and indulge in cant about the cost. If popular
education is worth all they say it is, it is cheap
at any cost. 44 Am I my brother's keeper f*
was a question worthy of Cain, the first mur-
derer. Society has recorded that we are, and
God indorses it and demands faithfulness.
Hear the words of the wise: "There is that
scattereth and yet iucreaseth; and there is
that withholdeth and it tendeth to poverty."
Prov., xi., 24.
Let our next legislature take hold of the pub-
lic school matter with a faithful hand. Put
upon the statute-book a law requiring the at-
tendance of children upon school at least four
months of each year. Make it the duty of
g; and juries to indict persons who do not edu-
c tte their children, and require them to give
good reason why they do not do so. Make
s ich people feel that the eyes of the public are
upon them, and that public opinion, as well as
law, pronounces them criminal to their highest
trust. The spirit of the great Teacher who
biessed little chddren should place every chris-
tian on the side of compulsory popular educa-
tion. Higher ground, fellow-citizens. Thy
f.iend, Aminadab Smith.
MM
f
Neuralgia, Soiatica, Lumbago,
Backache, Soreness of the Chest, Gout,
Quinsy, Sore Throat, Swellings and
Sprains, Burns and Scalds,
General Bodily Pains,
Tooth, Ear and Headache, Frosted Feet
and Ears, and all other Pains
and Aches.
No Preparation on earth equals St. Jacobs Oil
ft •«/>, sure, simple and cheap External Remedy.
SAWS9 Curtis & Co.
1m mH B 81! to 819 North Second Street, St. Louis, Mo.
Manufacturer* of .veij description of Circular, Mill, and CroM-Cut Saw.; Wnolssal* Dultfi in
Robber and Laatber Belting, Film, Mandrel., Cant Hook., Saw Gammer., I'pitu. aad
ail Saw nnd Plamin. Mill Supplies; S<>!« Manufacturer, at L,»ckwooU'» Patent Slotted
Circular Saw. ETEKY SAW W ARRANTEDi I. Careful attention to repair work. Agrente for
and GRINDING
MACHINERY.
Oar New Illustrated Catalogue mailed li-ee on application.
TANITE EMERY WHEELS
HAZARD POWDER COMPANY
OPFUR THROVGH THEIR AGJSTTS,
J. S. BR(V\TN & CO,, Galveston, Texas,
COXKIfiSIOW KEKCHAHTS.
tAlTlSTOI.
McAlpine, Baldrid^e & Co.,
COTTON FACTORS
AND
Commission Merchants,
214 Strand, <Mal'ory Building.) Galveston^
THE LARGEST AS30RTlfE2f7.' OF
, iiliAu
TO BE POUND IN THE SOOTH.
Hunters and Miners shcxxld use no others, as its strength
ior to all others.
is rarely equaled and quality
B. B. Kawley & Co.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
AXP DEALERS IN
FI.01R. PROVISIONS AND GRAIN.
J. S. BROWN & CO.
STBA2TD, GALVESTON, TEXAS,
JJAVE FOll SALE THE LARGEST AND BEST SELECTED STOl'l
BROUGHT SOUTH, COMPRISING
EVER
HARDWARE, TINWARE,
A trial entails but the comparatively trifling outlay
of SO Cents, and every one suffering with ps
can have cheap and positive proof .of its claims.
Directions in Eleven Languages.
80LD BY ALL DRUGGISTS AND DEALERS IS
MEDICItfE.
A.VOGEI.EII & CO.,
Baltimore. Jtfd., XT. JS. JL
IRON, STEEL, NAILS, CASTINGS, BELTING,
Ill's»
n
Tm
n
JULi
RY,
It. A. Brown & Co.,
COTTON FACTORS
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
ttESST- I 204 STB AND,
alf. h riERsqx.) Galveston, texas.
WM. HEXDLEY & CO.,
COTTON ANO WOOL FACTORS,
GALVF.STOW, TEXAS.
guns, pistols, powder. shot and metallic cartridges.
PARTIES WISHING TO VISIT THE
"Old Country." or to brine their iriends to
Galveston, can purchase THROUGH TICKETS to
or from
LIVERPOOL,
SOUTHAMPTON,
PARIS,
BREMEN,
IIAVHE,
LONDON,
mpoi
CONTINENTAL, EUROPE.
First and Second Cabin. Sleeraa:© and
Emigrant ; also Mound Tr!}> Tickets.
Tickets sold from all European Ports
THROUGH TO TEXAS.
For Kates of Fare aad other information, apply
In person or by letter to
Charles G. Clifford,
Ticket AG., 51. and H. R.
Union Ticket Office, llt> Treinont St., Galveston.
tion had had the courage to express openly the
wishes of the people, or if they had merely
been honest enough to shame the devil by tell-
ing the truth, instead of the platform that is
now presented to the people, they would have
presented a document that would have con-
demned iu the most emphatic language the
maladministration of Gov. Roberts. But the
object of the Dallas convention was not to ex-
press the wishes of the people, or to discuss the
needs of the state, but it was simply to re-
nominate old Roberts. The welfare of the
state had to yield to the privata interests of a
handful of professional tricksters. As long as
the state has an acre of land to give away, as
long as the governor has the appointment
of officials ever the state institutions, where
big pay is given for little work; as long as
there is a chance to speculate with the re-
sources of the state, just so long the bourben
democracy will trample right and justice un
der foot in order to remain in the ascendency.
Up to a certain point the Dallas convention
has considerable resemblance with the Chicago
convention. The Grant men spared no effort
to secure the nomination of Grant; they gained
over the delegates from the various state con-
ventions. and had them instructed for Grant.
The machine worked most conspicuously at
Springfield. 111. Just so Rol>erts s devoted ad-
mirers succeeded in counties in this state, in
which three-fourths of the democratic voters
ware open and pronounsed in their opposition
to Roberts. The convention farce reached it»
highest point in Bexar county, where even
the anti-Roberts delegates were induced
bv fair and foul means to vote for Roberts.
But here the comparison between the Chicago
and the Dallas conventions ceases. At Chicago
the delegates refused to obey the instructions
which a fraudulent majority had forced on
them. Thev voted against Grant. The con-
vention itself rejected the fraudulently elected
Grant delegates. Thus it was that the nomi-
nation of Grant was defeated, for if ail the
delegates that were instructed for him had
voted for him he would have heen nominated
on the first ballot. How different it was ar
Dallas. Sot one of the delegates who had been
lixstructed for Roberts dared to vote against
the wishes of the machine politicians. The
party lash was so mercilessly applied to them
that they did not dare express au adverse opin-
ion ; and so it came that Bexar county,
which is overwhelmingly anti-Roberts,
voted for him. Thms it happened that at Dal-
las a man was nominated who has done the
state more real damage than the worst man in
it; a man who drove old Sam Houston out of
his gubernatorial office, when he refused to
sanction secession; a man who drove the state
of Texas out of the union in spite of the will of
the people; a man who, if justice were to pre-
vail, could only be saved from just punish-
ment by the exercise of executive clemency.
But even if there were none of these objec-
tions to him, his maladministration would be
in itself sufficient ground for forever exclud-
ing him from the gubernatorial office.
One of the peculiar features of the platform
is that it has nothing to say about
the time-honored principles of the de-
mocracy. The convention was probably aware
that between nominating Roberts and indors-
ing Hancock tho principles of the time-hon-
ored democracy, whatever they may be, would
be tern into tatters. In 1873, when Ireland
was the chairman of the democratic executive
committee, in his pronunciamiento to the dem-
ocrats he stated, among other important infor-
mation, that when ilr. Greeley was nominated
the heart of every democrat and patriot sank
within him, but the liberal republicans forced
a man on them who had made war on them for
forty years. That was the thanks old Greeley
got from the democracy for sacrificing himself.
Ajid he had only fought them with his pen.
Bnt now the Cincinnati convention ha3 forced
on the democracy a man who fought the
demcrats mercilessly with his sword.
Worai-Proof Cotton.
Hybrid stood the test three
reasons. Matures crop one hundred days from
planting. Now about all picked out, August 12.
Seeds for Sale this Fall at oOe. Each.
Lint extra. See Cotton Exchanges. Larger bolls;
containing more lint than ordinary Cotton. No one
will ever regret having bought tne Hybrid Cotton
Seeds. Address L. C. WHITE,
Jasper, Texas.
n
it
SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE
Lec, McBride & Co.,
COTTON AND WOOL FACTORS
and
General Commission Merchants,
214 STRAND, GALVESTON.
H. Seeligson & Co.,
COTTON FACTORS
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GALVESTON.
Order* for Future Contracts Solicited.
ft
Hap^ood Collegiatft Institute,
AVENUE I. BETWEEN NINETEENTH AND
TWENTIETH STREETS.
Open* September 6tb«
Diplomas, under a charter,
given to pup,is wl c finish the lull course. At
the earnest solicitation of patrons, a few small
bovg will be received in the Primarv T»«-partment
oaly. MRS. S. R. BE. BE,
MRS. E. A. HL FFMASTER.
Notice.
THE GMSTflGAS WAR
All order*, or complaints, to receive prompt at-
tention. should be left at the office of the company,
in the brick building, on
Market Street, between Twenty-fourth
and Twenty-fiftb Streets,
between the hours of 3 aad 12 o'clock a. m.
ACG. BUTTLAR. Secretary.
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.
\\TM ARB AGENTS FOR THE FOL-
t\ lowing brands of TOBACCO, manufactured
expressly for us by T. C. Williams & Co., of Rich-
mond. Va:
Moore, Stratton& Co.'s Celebrated Navy, 10 oz.
Ph'jenix Navy, ti s.-
Little Peter Twist, 6's.
Juno 12 inch Plug.
Queen City, 11 inch, 4's. #
Favorite 3 and 7 oz. Twist.
"Texas'' Natural Leaf. 4's.
MOORE, STRATTON Sc CO., Galvestou.
TRY VEXABIES
CHIEF
NAVY TOBACCO.
CHEW KEJSTO
AND
Jack Haverly Navy.
MARX & KEMPNER,
Sole Agents at Galveston.
T. C. Williams & Co.'s Original
LUCYHINTON
TOBACCO; Also,
Golden Eagle, Navy A Wedding Cake.
For sale only by MARX d: HE.TIPNEB.
Tlie Death of the Late Col. Jared
Kirby in the Rocky Mountains.
LTo the News.l
In CA\n\ Gunnison County, Col., August 2, 1880.—
Please allow me through your valuable columns to
add a few lines of respect to the memoiy of a gal-
lant Texan who died here inth« mountains while a
member of mv prospecting- party. The latter part
of Mav Col. Kirby. myself others left Lead-
ville for Roaring Fork Ciiv. a mining camp, some
hundred miles distant, and. after b«ing out a few
d »ys. he was taken ric*. At this ti&a* we had l«st
the trail, and wancered over on ttoe reservation
We then camped for three days, and. as h« gre*
worse, Col. Kirby rode one of tht pack animals,
and we proceeded to Ajp«n, some fifty miles dis-
tant, the nearest mining camp, where he ceuid get
medical attention. >&e immediately summeaed
the best doctor in the to* a. who visited him :r«ZB
two to four times a, day, aud attentive tneads &.d
nuuistered to him aud every comfort and
luxury was provided that could be aad. He
was so much admired for his gen
tl -manly depurtment for his christian bearing by
his friends and by the apparently rough and hardy
miner, that everyone who nad an opportunity
willingly oiTered aH they could to sooth his aching
pains, but it was all without relief; he grew worse
d*iiy. and after lingering seventeen days witb bil-
lions typhoid fever, he gently passed into euratey,
on the 14th day of June. On the 15th he was
buried at Aspen with masonic honors. The funeral
w is largely attended b>- masons and miners gener-
al v.
The death of one of Texas's most gallant sons
will be deeply regretted by his many friends in
C dorado, as well as by his numerous friends all
over the large state of Texas. Col. Kirby lived a
true christian life and died in the belief of a
Savior.
The name of Col. Kirby. as noble, brave and true
a man as ever lived, wdl never be blotted from the
memory of his many friends. Respectfully.
J. W. 6AYLES.
Rich in fat-producing material beyond all
other foods and medicines are Malt Bitters.
Why Don't You Cliew
JACKSON'S BEST?
EVEBYlBODY ELSE CHEWS IT.
LeGIERSB 6c Co., Sole Agents at Galvectoa.
THE GENUINE
Br. C. McLANE'S
LIVER PILLS
d as a remedy "lor all tfee
to." but in aflhetiom of the
are net
ills that
i a heir
Liver, and in all Bilious Complaints, Dyspepsia,
md Fick II—dsrhr, or diseases of feat character,
• hey stand without a aval.
ACUE AND FEVEft.
No better cathartic can be used preparatory to,
or after taking quinine.
As a simple purgative they are tm»|nsl«i.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
The genuine are never sugar-coated.
Each box has a red-wax seal on the lid with the
impression, " Da McLANE*8 LIVER PILLS."
Each wrapper bears the signatures of c. McLaws
»nd Flkmimc —
LANS'd
list upon having the genuine Da C. Mc*
LTVSft PILLS, prepared hy
FLEMING QKOCL,
Flttshuh, pas.,
the market being full of imitatiosa of the name
Me Lm—m, foiled differently hat SMM pronnn-
AUCTION SALES.
Auction Sale.
WILL SELL THIS DAY, AT 10
One Fine B. W. Bed-room Set, complete; 2 Office
Desks, 6 Mohair Parlor Chairs. 1 M. T. Table; also i
large and well assorted lot of Crockery and Glass
ware, to which dealers' attention is called; Dry
Goods, Notions, etc.; 1 Top Buggy.
SYDNOR dt DINKELAKER,
Auctioneers.
Underwriter's Sale—Stoves.
WE WILL SELL ON SATURDAY^
21st inst.. at our salesrooms. Strand, for ac-
count of insurance: 4
75 CHARTER OAK COOKING STOVES (MORE
OR LESS), HEATING STOVES
(Number not known), slightly damaged by water.
PARK, LYNCH & CO.. Auctioneer*.
IHOS. C. WILLIAMS & CO.
TOBACCO MANUFACTURERS,
Richmond and Danville, Ya.
ST" Good® Sold hy all prominent Texas Jobbers.
JT. A. SLAUGHTER,
RESIDENT AGENT, GALVESTON, TEXAS.
HILL CITY S1EAI TOBACCO WORKS
LYNCHBURG, VA.
HANCOCK & KINNIER,
Proprietors.
Manufacturers of all Graded
Chewing Tobacco.
Prloe lias #,*nished on Application.
A. c. garsia, Agent, Galveston.
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA,
Manufacturer of all styles and grades
TWIST A! FANCY TOBACCOS,
Solicits orders from the Jobbing Tr»de.
Tibbett and Celebrated 7 onnee Twist
Is taered with » FINK PAFEK TAG (fac simile above)
Beware otCmltnSlon., and see that each
tee tMn the n&znu of J. B. PACB.
KEPT BT CTBST-CUkBB DKALJCaS THBOrCHOl'T TKXjIS.
WOOD
N D
76 STI
LEAGUE'S BLTLPING.
CHAS. KKLLNER. W. J. FREDERICS
J. Frederick & Kellner,
COTTON FACTORS
AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GALVESTON. TEXAS.
Office: Corner Mechanic and Twenty-second sta
HEW YOKE.
c has. f. hohorst.
C. F. Holiorst & Co.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
115 Pearl Street. NEW YORK.
Stove Foundry, \
Louleville, lay. j
66, G8 aad 70 Treaaont Street,
Galreatoo, Texas.
Caas. Hhtdzxheimkr.
N-w YorlB
TO THE HEADERS OF THE NEWS:
It Is well known that hot weather brings sickness, and that the grett-
est care is necessary to prevent disorders, even on the part of those most
healthy. What there is in the heat that should canae disease can not
certainly be known, hut cholera, dysentery, debility, lassitude, vertigo,
and many other sudden and dangerous maladies, come every season, and
cause great suflferiug and thousands of deaths. Few peopla go through
the Summer without unpleasant symptoms*. The mouth becomes dry and
parched, the tongued furred with white, the pulse irregular, the head
leverish, the body cramped and the limbs stvollen and tired. Ladies
especially, with their natural delicacy aud tendency to female troubles,
find the hot weather almost unbearable; while little Children are dying
every day from exhaustion, and because Parents neglect precaution and
care. A prominent and well-known physician of New York asserts as
his positive belief that more than three-fourths of all so-called Summer
complaints arise from disordered secretions, and that these secretlonary
organs, which, by being out of order, cause so much trouble, are the
kidneys and liver. The brain controls the life, but the lower part of the
body rules the health.
There is one, and only one known vegetable that will absolutely regu-
late and control the Kidneys and Liver at all times, and thus prevent
the many dangers of the Summer. That vegetable (a West India leaf) is
used as the basis of Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver Cure. It Is pure,
pleasant to the taste and absolutely certain in its results. It keeps those
who intelligently use it in perfect health, and cures those whose secre-
tions are deranged. For all urinary complaints ot either sex it Is Infal-
lible. For all bilious troubles it is certain. For the hot season it is
invaluable, and every person of eare and intelligence should not fail to
keep Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver Cure near at hand, and use it upon
the approach of the slightest symptoms. It may save your life or that of
some dear friend; it will certainly prevent much suffering. It is for sale
by druggists in all parts of the world; be careful and take no other.
" A word to the wise is sufficient."
G. w. Bird,
Houston. Texas.
G. W. inRD & CO.,
OMMISSION MERC HANTS
For the sale of
Flour, Grain, Provisions, Produce, Etc
HOUSTON, TEXAS.
Liberal adrances made on consigunaenta.
PROPOSALS.
AND
Proposals are imhe» intil
August 24, lhSO. tor furnishing supplies to the
Deaf and Dumb, Blind and Lunatic Asylums. Bids
will be onened August 25, 1880, in presence of the
Board of the Asylums.
Deaf and Dumb Asylum.—6000 lbs. fresh beef,
best quality; 20 bbls. hour, choice feunily; 1 bbl.
hominy, best fre9h; 1 bbl. grits, best, fresh; bbl.
mackerel, best No. 3; 1 bbl. rice, best Quality; 1
bbi. sirup, best Texas or Louisiana; 4 bbls. sugar,
coffee A: 1 btl. sugar, powdered: 1 bbl. apples,
best dried; 1 bbl. peaches, best dried, unpealed;
100 lbs. hams, best canvassed; 100 lbs. bacon, best
sides; 200 tt>s. prunes, best, fresh; 200 lbs. tomatoes,
2 or 3-lb. cans, Texas made; 30 lbs. tea, best green;
100 lbs. beans, best white; 3 tcs. lard, best, fresh;
32 doz. sea foam; 12 gals, pickles. ^ chow ohow, ^
mixed ; 2 doz. brooms, best quality; 2 sks. coffee,
best Mexican: 1 sk. salt, best table: 8 cases oil.
Pratt's astral. 150 degrees: 2 bxs. soap, Leser's; 3
bxs. starch, Geo. Fox's best ; 3 bxs. maccaroni. beat
quality; 40 cords hard wood, 10 cords cedar wood.
Blind Asylum.—3000 lbs. fresh beef, round steak;
250 lbs. bacon, clear sides; 200 lbs. hnms, sugar-
cured; 850lbs. lard, best: 5000lbs. flour. Eichernian's
best or Scott mills: 10 lbs. tea, imperial and black,
good quality; 1500lbs. sugar, cofTie a: 10 lbs. soda;
1(X) lbs. prunes; 10 lbs. black pepper: 1C0lbs. apples,
steam dried: 5 lbs. red pepper; 2 bbls. rice, best
Louisiana; 1 bbl. lady peas; 1 bbL butter-beans; 2
bbls. srits; bbl. vinegar, best home made; 3
boxes soap. Colgate's laundry: 5 boxes starch,
Foxes's; 1 box candles,.to; 1 sack salt, fine; 2 sacks
Rio coffee, best quality; 24 doz. sea foam; 10 doz.
soap, toilet; 3 cases oil. Pratt's astral; 10 gallons
whisky .good quality: W cords cedar wood; 20 cords
hard wood, black jack and red oak; 150 bushels
com. good in shuck. Dry goods: 50 yds. cotton
diaper; 1 bolt calico, best; l gross buttons, shirt;
1 gross thread, 50 to CO white, Coats's or Clark s;
6 dozen thread, 50 to GO black. Coats's or Clark's;
1 dozen pairs socks, boys', plain; 1 dozen pairs
children's hose, plain, colored: £4 do/en pairs shoes,
girls'. 1 to 5. plain leather gaiters; V > aczeii pairs
shoes, boys". 5 ;to 8, plain brograns: ^ dozen
hats, boys*. 6^ to 7K- plain: 12 dozen needles, as-
sorted, 5to 10; 12 dozen buttons, 'arge porcelain;
12 dozen buttons, pants; 2 dozen cotton tape, 1 inch
wide.
Lcnatic Asylum.—35,COO lbs. fresh beef, best in
market: 16G0 lbs. lard, best: 1000 lbs. hams, s. c.;
350 lbs. tobacco, bright twist, 3 oz.; 75 lbs. black
pepper, best; 200 lbs. tea. Imperial: 1S03 lbs. Rio
coffee, choice; 700 lbs. sugar, coffee A: 450 lbs.
sugar, crushed; 4000 lbs. sugar, choice La; 1U00 lbs.
navy beans, b»:st; 2000 lbs. grits, best; 2000 lbs.
hominy, best; 1000 lbs. apples, dried. be>t: 1000 lbs.
peaches, dried, unpeelt d. best; 1300 lbs. prunes,
best; 3000 lbs rice.new; 200 lbs baking powders.Tay-
lor's; 350 gallons molasses, reboiled Louisiana ; 200
gallons viaegar. oest cider; 3 bbls. pickles,
best, small; 4 bbls krout; 130 bbls. flour. Plant's.
Stannard's. Eagle Steam or Eicherman's best;
10 cases Pratt's astral oil; 35 cases gasoline oil: 6
dozen brooms, best heavy; 3 dozen buckets. 3 hoop
patented: 12 barrels potatoes. Irish; 3 barrels
onions; 15-) cerds hard wood, sound; 100 cords
cedar wood, sound. Dry Goods: 800 yards brown
domestic, 4-4 Indian Head; 150 yards bleached do-
mestict, 4-4 Fruit of Loom; 60 yards bleached
sheeting, 10-4 Ellerton; 150 yards brown duck,
Portland C: 100U yards calico, dark Conestopa.
Bristol or Allen's; 100 yardsof flannel gray twilled,
Stalls; 600 yards jeans. Ermine doeskin; 150
yards canton flannel, from Pemberton G; 200
yards drilling, Appleton's; 25 yards oil cloth, white
marble: 3 dozen linen towels: 8 dozen bed spreads,
single white; 30 dozen Coats's thread. Nos. 20 to 60;
2 dozen gum sheets: 10 dozen women's hose, extra
heavy; 60 pairs brogans. men's, Nos. 8 to 11, full
stock; 36 pairs carpet slipoers, N03. 6 to 9; 100
men's hats, good wool, hiedium crown and brim;
1000 Milford's needles, assorted.
Bids shall be made separately, to wit: Fresh
beef; bacon and lard: flour; rice. peas, beans, grits
and hominy; soap, coarse and fine salt, vinegar,
starch, soda, pepper and baking powders; coffee
and tea; white and brown sugar: molass.es: rnack-
eral. prunes, apples, krout, brooms, candles, oil,
casned goods, whisky and tobacco; dry goods;
wood. Bond must accompany bids.
:. DA$D]
LOTTERIES.
NO nOKE DELAY IN FILLING OK-
ders for the above celebrated brands of
CIGARS.
Have perfected arrangements, and will have full
stocks bereafter. Send orders to
LANfaE, LIS WIT A CO., Sole Agents.
TOBACCOS!
WE ARE MOW CARRYING THE
HEAVIEST STOCK OF TOBACCO
IN THE SOUTH.
Having made EARLY PURCHASES, we are
enabled to offer
EXTRA INDUCEMENTS IN PRICES,
and we solicit the Orders of the Trade-for all
QUALITIES OF TOBACCOS from Store
and from Factory Direct.
A TRIAL ORDER will convince the Trade of our
LOW PRICES.
LeGIERSE & CO.
STEPH. H.
DEN, Comptroller.
PIKE NIX COPPER, BRASS
AND
SHEET IRON WORKS.
PAUL SHEAN,
Successor to
8hea!h «fc DI SB ROW.
Manufacturer of improved
STEAM TRAINS. BATTERIES and CLAK1-
FIEP.S. for making sugar, aad all deecriutiOB of
Copper and Sneet Iron work. Dealer in Lift aad
Force PUMPS of all description: IronPipe, Fittings.
Valves, and all description of Brass Goods.
PLUMBING AND CAS FITTING.
Steamboat, 8tf*imsbip, Engineers' and Plantation
Supplier. Agent for the celebrated KNOWLE8
STEAM PUMPS and MACK'S PATENT INJECTORS.
▲11 sizes sold at manufacturers' prices. All orders
promptly filled.
157,159 and 161 Mechanic Street,
GALVJESTON. TEXAS.
Land for Sale
A TRACT OF LA If® CONTAINING
about Five Tkoatand Aeree, located and
frosting oa the Nnec-^s river, about SO miles from
Corpus Christi, on* of the moat dweirs hie places for
a raacho. plenty of Stock Water is the dry eat sea-
son. Price and terms moderate. Apply to
DODDRllKsE k DAVIS, Corpus Christi.
Also. Os« Thsosssi Acres, located in An-
derson eouary, ltfHi mfies north, M decrees weet at
Palestine. Two oontempiated railroads will pass
through or oear this tract, which is well timber* '
sji%anu * datis,
Corpa. Chita*
J8BI V. WATTS,
L.S.L
TAKE NOTICE!
That this is the only Lottery in any state ever voted
on and indorsed by its people.
Lonisiaua State Lottery Co.
This institution was r^analarly incorporated by
the legislature of the state for Educational and
Charitable purposes in 1^68. for the term of Twenty
five Years, to which contract the inviolable faith of
the state is pledred.which pledge has been renewed
by an overwhelming popular vote, securing its
franchise in the new constitution adopted Dec. 2t
1879. with a capital of $1,00,».000. to which it has since
added a reserve fund or 000. Its Grand Single
Number Distribution will take place monthly, oi
the Second Tuesday. R Nevar Scales or Postpones.
Look at the foiloivlag distribution*
At flew Orleans, Tuesday, Kept. 14, IS 80
CAPITAL PRIZE, $30,000.
100.000 TICKETS AT TWO DOLLARS EACH
Half Tickets, $1.
list or paizas.
1 Capital Prize $30,000
1 •• 10.000
1 •• •• 5,0-jo
2 Prizes of $26<X)
5 1000 5.000
80 •• 500 10.000
100 •• 100 10.006
200 - 50 10.000
C00 •• 20 10,0»
1000 •• 10 10,000
approximation prizes.
9 Approximation Frizes of $300 2,700
9 200
9 " ** 100 900
1857 Prizes, amounting to $110,400
IF* Applications for Agencies or Rates to Clubs
should only be made to the office in New Orleaas.
Write, clearly stating full address, for further in
formation, or send orders to
HI. A. DA I"P1IIN, New Orleans. La.
Or to J. D. SAWVEK) one door west of
News Office. Galveston.
All our Grand Extraordinary Drawings are under
the supervision and management of (ians. <S. T.
BE A IKEGA R D and JIB4 L A. EARLY.
Capital Prize $100,000, Whole Tickets $10.
REWARD!
The pitrlic in general will
be glad to know that the SPANISH GOVERN-
MENT offers
$5 00,000
to the Lucky Holder of the Right Ticket for the
GRAND DRAWING
that is to take place in the CITY OF HAVANA
on the
4TH DAT OF SEPTEMBER, 1880.
This Drawing: is composed of only 18,000
TICKETS, and betddes the
CAPITAL PRIZE OF $500,000
There are many other Prises, amounting in all to
$1,350,000. On request we shall mail Circulars
an a give any information desired.
Also orders for LOUISIANA LOTTERY TICK
ETS. Capital Prize 830,000, Tickets only $2.
will be promptly attendee to.
BORMO & BROTHER,
(Established since 1848.)
TOBACCO AND CIGARS.
OFFICE—45 Camp and 120, 122. 124 and 126 Gravier
street. NEW ORLEANS, LA.
P. O. Address—Drawer 01.
C00XS EV 4PORAT0RS,
IMPROVED.
(Solid Bottoms, no soldered seams over the fire.)
GOLD BASIS
HORIZONTAL CANE MILLS
(Capacity equal to Upright Mills of double the
weight and price )
"Vertical ZVIills, Furnace Irons, Etc.
MANNY & CO,, Manufacturers,
ST. LOUIS. MISSOURI.
Circulars and Colored Posters Free.
Wolston, Wells & Vidor,
COTTON FACTORS,
OMMISSION AND FORWARDING MERCHANTS,
AND,
GALVESTON. TEXAS
john r. harriett*
BOCITON.
Cargill A Co.,
COTTON FACTORS,
ALSO
HIDES AID COCmY PRODCd
HOUSTON. TEXAS.
MISCELLANEOUS.
GALTBSTOS.
A. S. EX LINE,
pkalkx in
COTTON, WOOL & HIDES.
WAREHOUSE AND PICKERY:
Corner Avenue A aud Efg;titeentli St#
lOfficewithC. E. Richards.l GALVESTON, Tex.
HAS now on hand 1700 rolls Bagging, which If
offered t-j the trade at reduced prices. Sam<
pies may ba neeu at salesroom of Park, Lynch A Co,
SHIP CHANDLERY AND NAVAL STORES.
A FULL STOCK OF MANILA. HEMP
and Wire Rope. Blocks, Sheaves,
Flags, Bunting anu Canvas, and ail goodfl
in these lines always on hand. Sails, Tents,
Tarpaulins and Awnings made to order.
Orders solicited.
THEO. K. THOMPSON,
(Successor to David Wakelee.)
208 and 210 Strand, Galveston, Texas.
I)rayage and Storage.
R. P. SARGENT & CO.,
General
llUl
Agents and Warehousemen.
MOVING SAFES AND ALL KINDS OP HAAVl
MACHINERY A SPECIALTY
Agents for the sale of Herring's Patent Cham
pion Safes, fiamples constantly on hand.
joshua miller.
F
L jLI
t
ins.
C. B. LEE .& CO.,
IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDERS
AID
MACHINISTS.
MAXTFACTCRntS OF
Steam Engines, Saw Hills,
Boilers, Mill & Gin Gearing
SHAFTING. PULLEYS, BRASS AND IRON
PUMPS, ETC.
!PP Particular attention given to orders for Iroi
Fronts and Castings for buildfetcs.
All kinds of Job Work solicited. Satis*
faction Guaranteed.
CORNER WINNIE AND THIRTY SECOND STS.
(Near Railroad Depot),
Galveston, Texas.
NEW ORLEANS.
PAUL GELPI & BRO.,
37 Decatur St., New Orleans,
IMPORTERS OF
Fine Wines, Cordials, Brandies,
SARDINES, BRANDY CHERRIES,
CASTILE SOAP,
Maccaroni, Vermicelli,
French, Italian and Spanish Produce
IN GENERAL.
ON HAND THE FOLLOW-
Wines of Nartique and Buzourdan.
<*ld Brandies from A. C. Menkoa
Marie Brisard & Roper. Vermouth of Noilly Prat
and M. Sola. Champagnes of Most A Shannon an.l
Marie Brisard & Roper. Vermouth of Noilly Praf
pagne
Lords Roederer. Old Tom Gin ef 8ir Rebt. Burnett
& Co..M deirafrom Leacok A Co., Port "Winesfrom
Sanderman A Ce.. Pickles, Sauces and Condiments
of Crosse «Sr Bla« kwell, etc.
MAaOARXT HACGHKRY,
bersaan kuotz.
MARGARET IIAUGIIERY & CO.
MARGARET'S
ir
Nos. 70, 72, 74, 76 nnd 78 New L»T»e St.
NEW ORLEANS. LA.
*HOC8TOX.
DR. M. P^RL,
HOUSTON. TEXAS.

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The Galveston Daily News. (Galveston, Tex.), Vol. 39, No. 129, Ed. 1 Friday, August 20, 1880, newspaper, August 20, 1880; (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth464523/m1/2/ocr/: accessed April 21, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Abilene Library Consortium.

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