The Shamrock Texan (Shamrock, Tex.), Vol. 35, No. 4, Ed. 1 Friday, May 13, 1938 Page: 4 of 4

\
-m
.
4-'
srtri.-.n. ■ iti'^rrTi'i'nw^'vr.tMr :'r’ i, Ti:''"r ' ■ ■"-iVi-Ji
IT»ritlMMMM>1>TIOTim»nnrilMBIWWMMF11 mi ill
fiSf
m
ml
Ira
'S-^-4 ’
.-•• ill
t
8
t
s
p
tfR^I
t
v
a
«
«
ti
K
8
It
a
o
p
U
is
to
Bt
t!
in
te
u
I
rt
n
ti
re
w
it
Pi
ti
01
ti
w
It
8
is
n
fi
k
e
It
t
il
i
fj
gljf
3!S
THE SHAMROCK TEXAN, Shamrock, Texas
——--
0
Friday, May 13, ^
s°ss®y
CLUB HOLDS FINAL
MEETING THURSDAY
' The Thursday Literary club had
their filial meeting of the year
Thursday with a luncheon at the
U-Drop Inn and a program at the
home of Mrs. Bedford Harrison.
The luncheon table was beauti-
fully decorated with pink and blue
larkspur and Mrs. J. R. Benson en-
tertained with piano music during
tlie hour.
A short business meeting was held
preceding the program in which
federation news was given. Mbs.
Lyle Holmes, of the Forum dub,
gave a book review, “The American
Dream" by Michael Foster, which
wa-s greatly enjoyed by the group.
Punch was served by the hostess
to Mesdames Lyle Holmes, guest;
Denson, Percy Bones, L. E. Davis,
T. C. Davis, C. R. Green, Edwin
Griffin, A. M. Hilburn, H. B. Hill,
L. B. Hiner, E. H. Kromer, R. C.
Lev,’is, Charles Perry, Ben A. Skid-
more and B. A. Zeigler, members.
The club was adjourned by the
president, Mrs. Kromer, not 'to meet
until September.
-o
C. u. W. CLUB HOLDS
MEETING WEDNESDAY
Mrs. Howard WCaitheiby enter-
tained at her home Wednesday af-
ternoon for the C. U. W. club. Roll
call was answered with a favorite
quotation, pertaining to Mother's
Day, which was the program theme.
■Dorothy Harding and May Belle
Veatch gave interesting discussions
on Mother's Day.
Present were Meedames Charles
Lang. W. O. Marrow, M. S. Kava-
naugh, and Len Pouter, Misses Edna
Wood, Beth Word, May Belie
Veatch and Dorothy Harding.
--o-
‘Sonny Jim’ Is ‘Eagle Child’
FINE ARTS CLUB HAS
PICNIC THURSDAY
Members of the Thursday Fine
Arts club enjoyed a picnic on Elm
Creek last night as the closing en-
tertainment of their season’s pro-
gram.
Those attending were Misses Sue
Alien, Pauline Benson, Martha Jer-
Bigan, Mary Frances Templeton,
May Belle Veatch, Mesdames Hor-
ace Belew, Cabot Brannon, Sol
Blonstein, Earl Brandt, Ruth Carn-
es,, Garrison Bush, and Garrison
Wallace.
As a sort of assistant president, James Roosevelt tins oeen at the
same time a “Great White Father Number Two" to the Indians.
So when members of the Blackfeet Indian tribe visited the White
House the other day they made “Sonny Jim” one of the tribe and
gave him the somewhat significant name of “Eagle Child.” Here’s
the tribal neophyte with two of his new brothers, Harry Oldperson,
left, who is only 5 years old. and Joe Butterfly, 7.
On WPA, Wants
Congress Seat
iiiiimiinnii
GERMAN BANKERS
JAILED IN BRAZIL
LEWIS SAYS LABOR
WON’T TAKE CUTS
CIO CHIEF DECLARES ONLY
UNIONS SAVED COUNTRY
FROM PANIC IN 1933
ATLANTIC CITY, N, J., May 13.
—John L. Lewis, stormy leader of
the CIO, pounded his fist ‘before the
Amalgamated Clothing workers
Thursday and shouted that organ-
ized labor would stand for no re-
ductions in wages.
Placing tlhie nation’s unemployed
at 13,000.000. Lewis called upon em-
ployers to “practice the right to
work.” He declared the unemploy-
ed “not for long this time” would
be “willing to watch their children
die.”
“Instead of letting wages be re-
duced,” he thundered, “we shall
lorce wages higher .and higher until
the workers of this country con buy
the food, the clothing and the other
things that are produced toy the
very machinery that has forced men
out of work.”
Lewis asserted widespread up-
LIBERTY
THEATRE
SUSPECTED “GREEN SHIRTS"
TAKEN IN CUSTODY BY
VARGAS POLICE
“When Better Pictures Are Shown
The liberty Will Show Them"
Saturday Afternoon & Nite—
WESTERN
—Serial & Comedies—
10c to All!
SATURDAY—
Walt Disney's Masterpiece
“SNOW WHITE &
The Seven Dwarfs’
Breaking reeords from coast
coast .... how yours to see
hreatli-taking natural colors . .
Opening Saturday morning at 10
o’clock, for morning matinee ONLY.
On the screen again at Satin-day
Night Preview and then regular
shows Sunday, Monday and Tues-
day. Admission, Children 15c at all
shows. Adults, 30c matinee; 35c
night shows and Sunday matinee.
Critics acclaim “Snow White” as the
ten best pictures of the year.
—Special Added Shorts—
Running for u seat in Congress
is Lawrence Smith of St. Louis,
above, who works for WPA and
supports a wife and two children
on $56 a month. Seeking the
post now occupied by Thomas C.
Hennings, Jr., a Democrat, Smith
says there would be some
changes made in WPA if he were
elected. He's counting on votes
from 26,000 fellow WPA work-
ers in St. Louis.
RIO DE JANEIRO, May 13. —
Seven officials of the local branch
of the German Bank of South Am-
erica were jailed1 yesterday in a na-
tiio-n-wide roundup of suspected
“Green Shirt” participants in- Wed-
nesday’s unsuccessful fascist coup
to overthrow President Getulio Var-
gas.
The seven, all members of the
stiff of the bank, a branch of the
Deutsch-Sudamerikanische Akiten-
gesellsohaft of Berlin, were Harry
Schaeffer, Arnold Federico Voige,
Arando Etihrat, Eugenio Lyria, Ed-
uardo Pereira, Armando Luiz Car-
valho and Cesar Menna Barreto.
Police said they were all members
I of the outlawed integralist action,
[ green-shirt fascist organization, and
had been linked with the uprising
in Which 40 persons unofficially
were reported to Ihiave been killed.
Detention of the seven) men was
regarded as significant in view of
recent measures adopted, in south-
ern Brazil against Nazi activities.
The seven were among more than
600 civilians and navy men arrested
and held for trial in the national
security court. The navy ministry
said eight naval officers had been
seized and imprisoned in the first
military region. Thirteen marine
guards and icne officer, who failed
to embark on the training ship Al-
mirante Saldanha on April 23 for a
voyage to the United States, also
i were jailed.
--o-
TEXAN ADS GET RESULTS!
WANT "ADS
RATES AND INFORMATION
10c per line first insertion, 5c
per line for subsequent insertions.
Count 6 average words to the line.
FREE FARMERS EXCHANGE
Farmers who are paid-up sub-
scribers may run ads free of
charge to exchange, buy or sell
anything except real estate and
oil and gas leases, and royalties.
All ads will 'be run 6 times.
FOR SALE—Brown Crowder cow-
■peas for planting'.
John
Hrnclar,
Pakan, or at Shamrock Poultry &
Egg.
4-6E
HIGH SCHOOL
GIRL
wants
housekeeping jab.
Inquire
at 501
North Main street.
3-2tp
Women—Address and mail adver-
tising material for us at home. We
supply everything. Good rate of pay.
No selling. No experience necessary.
Merchandise Mart, Box 523, Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin. 3-2tp
WANT TO RENT—4- or 5-room
furnished house. See James E.
Nicholson at Sun Set Camp. 2tfc
LOST— Sunday on Magic City
road, boy’s bicycle. Finder please
notify Wade Pike, Shamrock, Rt. 2
or at Lela store. 2-3tp
Married couple wants work on
farm. See M. D. Harvey, 6 miles
east, 114 mile north and Vi mile
back east of Shamrock. 308-6E
FOR RENT —4-room furnished
apartment, Mrs. Dora Morgan, 101
E. 10th St. 307-tfc
LOST — Child’s blue coat and
bracelet. Please return to Mrs. O. P.
Purcell. 307-tfc
COTTON SEED FOR SALE —
State-certified, pedigreed, Paymas-
ter, Kasch, and Acala seed; also
re-cleaned native seed. Priced right.
See E. C. Hofmann at Williams &
Miller Gin. 305-tfc
LEGAL NOTICES
CONTRACTORS’ NOTICE OF
TEXAS HIGHWAY
CONSTRUCTION
Sealed proposals for constructing
16.795 miles of Repairing Surface,
Stabilizing Shoulders. & Seal Coat
from Wheeler to Gray County line
on Highway No. 152, covered by
Control 397-2-7, in Wheeler County,
will be received at ‘the State High-
way Department, Austin, until 9:00
A. M„ May 24, 1938, and then pub-
licly opened and read. The attention
of bidders is directed to 'the Special
Provisions concerning .prevailing
and minimum wage rates and hours
of employment Included in the pro-
posals In compliance with House
Bill No. 54 of the 43rd Legislature
of the State of Texas, and House
Bill No. 115 of the 44th Legislature
of the State of Texas. The prevail-
ing wage rates listed below shall
apply as minimum wage rates cn
this project.
Title of
“laborer"
“Workman”
or “Mechanic”
Farm Home Life Subject
For Discussions As Club
Women Gather At Canyon
CANYON, May 13. — There are
10 problems today to every one
which existed 20 years ago. Vice Di-
rector Jack Shelton of the Exten-
sion Service of A. & M. College told
700 men and women attending the
eighth annual Home Demonstration
short course here Thursday.
Mr. Shelton referred ‘to market-
ing problems, insect pests, and dis-
eases of animals of the farm and
range. Development of any new
country is hastened by the scarcity
of pests and diseases, he said, tout
these come with intensive develop-
ment. To combat current problems,
■the speaker urged close attention to
scientific developments, constant
study and demonstration, and or-
ganization of rural industries local-
ly and nationally.
Existence Sharpens Wits
“Tlie farm folk of today and to-
morrow must know more than their
parents knew, and cooperate more
to exist,” he stressed.
The group was welcomed by Dr.
J. A. Hill of West Texas State Col-
lege after Mias Elizabeth Brooks of
Lubbock directed a sing-song. Mrs.
E. A. Michael, chairman of the Ran-
dall County Council of clubs, re-
sponded.
“The homes of our nation are
more important than all of our eth-
er institutions,” Dr. Hill declared.
"Without good homes there can toe
no happiness and no progress. The
building of better homes, with all
of the factors of education, religion,
and other forces involved, is the
greatest project tc which our peo-
ple can lend their best efforts.”
Women in Charge
Mrs. Jim Trout of Wheeler Coun-
ty, District 1 vice president, was
chairman of 'the morning session
and Mrs. W. G. Kennedy of Bailey
County, District, 2 vice president, of
the afternoon session.
Senior girls of the college home
economics department opened the
afternoon meeting, talking on styles,
canning, fraudulent advertising, and
other subject of Interest to farm
women. Tlie speakers were Mrs.
John Coy of Amarillo, Mrs. Mary
Alice Weed of Spearman, Miss Dolly
Meyer of Booker, Miss Floreine Cur-
rie of Canyon, and Miss Agnes Al-
ford of Canadian.
Music on Program
Rural women’s choruses from
Randall and Potter counties con
tributed the music of the afternoon.
Miss Frankie Dodson of Lockney,
speech student, gave a reading. Tlie
College Girls’ sextet sang at the
first session.
Principal afternoon talks were by
Prof. Paul Benbrook cf the college
department of economics and Mrs.
Bernice Claytor, Extension Service
specialist in home improvement.
The session adjourned for an in-
spect; m of the. college plant and
for a tea at the Phebe K. Warner
Home Management house.
from their ancient soil mr -are the-
selves exterminated. '' £
Country England's Pawn
Ancient and sovereign Ethlop-
he protested, has been the
the determination of Britain
Pawns
France to make a friend of
Foreign Secretaries Viscount {Li
ifax of Britain and Georges Bonn,
~t France, whose predecessors
Geneva sought to save Ethiopia m
almost 'wrecked, the league by AT
efforts, answered coolv that. 0|*
war could drive Italy icut of J
pla. And they were not prepared
go that far.
The negus saw his empire
from legal exfetenlse and;
Mg
U
tacitly voted out of the league
Vilhelm Munters of Latvia,
dent of 'the council, announced th»
,prw for ti
a majority e-f the 14 council nient
morn
bers favored “the British thesis”
forbi
President Munters said it
* ~fus
the expressed opinion of a i
Major#;
of the council members that le™,
states ccruld recognize the new it* J* ^
inn empire in East Africa if «■! ______
wished.
•Tills served to release an ;wa( m9
states from their 1936 pledges mLmH
ihr\ rrv'fWTi.l'Za TMiiecnlinlV ____
to recognize Mussolini’s conquest
Tlie negus, who rushed here ta® SS?
London against his doctors’ order, Ilf
to wage the last-ditch fight, served IB
notice that he will cany his inWtij^E
before 'the league assembly meetiw'l^fe
frt .QAn£i*mihpr IIP
Huge Spending
(Continued from Page One)
ionization of workers was the only
thing that prevented the present re-
cession from becoming “a wild pan-
ic,” and1 announced that on the first
day this country showed signs of
economic recovery his group would
^spring into action with a,n organ-
ization drive such as this country
never saw before."
“We struck three years -ago,” he
said, “'because -we knew we had to
strike when jobs were not ut such
high premium. We had only 1,000,-
000 workers to -back us then, but
next time we will have 4-,000.000
Workers back of us, and toy the time
t&e next depression rolls around the
working people 'will do something
about it."
I^ewis said '(She "next depression”
was certain to come because each
period of recovery carries with it
genus of depression—“as soon
as ndustrial concerns get out of
the red «ad into the Mack they be-
gin buying machinery to supplant
rfLz dicud (mfkA ojiMmoo
A TEXAN WANT AD!
Hotel Reform* it the ultimate in modem
beauty, luxury and splendor - an
architectural triumph incorporating th<
newest stream-lined equipment end
operating methods of the dey. The finest
hotel in the most glamorous resort city
on the continent... American operated
Americen and Mexican food... Rate*
considerebly lower then for comparable
accommodations in the United States.
Prevailing
Minimum Per
Diem Wage
(Based on Eight
(8) Hour Work-
ing Day)
Carpenter —..............r-.$8.00
Shovel Operator --------------8.00
Crane Operator_______________8-00
Powder Man --------- 8.00
Mechanic ------- 8.00
Crusher Operator -------------4.00
Asphalt Raker ......... 4.00
Roller Operator---------------4.00
Distributor Driver .....-......4.00
Distributor Operator ----------4.00
Tractor Operator .....-.......4.00
Blade Operator ....... 4.00
Broom Operator ----- 4.00
Truck Driver (over 1% tops).. 4.00
Finisher .............-......— 4.00
Form Setter .........—......4.00
Air Hammer Operator --------4.00
Blacksmith ...... 4.00
Fireman (Asphalt plant) -----4.00
Mixer Operator---------------4.00
Compressor Operator —......4.00
Pump Operator ______________- 4.00
Spreader Box Operator ......4.00
Steel Setter (Reinforcing
Steel) ..... 4.00
Oiler ..................-......4.00
Weigher ..................4.00
Truck Driver (1(4 tons & leas). 3.20
Flagman ..........——.......3.20
Unskilled Laborer ____________3.20
Teamster ........... 320
Dumper ------------ 3.20
Ftarm Setter’s Helper--------- 3.20
Wlatchman _____ 2.80
Cook ............. 2.80
Water Boy .......-..........2.40
Overtime and legal 'holiday work
shall be paid -for at the regular gov-
erning rates.
-Plans arid specifications available
at the office of W. C. Hagan, Resi-
dent Engineer, Childress, Texas, and
State .Highway 'Department, Austin.
Usual rights reserved. May 13-20.
Rankin’s amendment won 126 to
119, and later was approved 259 to
139 on a roll call.
How Much Per Month?
The much spirited fight was
among Democrats over 'the proposal
of minimum wages for WPA work-
ers. Representative Jerry O'Connell,
Democrat, Montana, suggested a
$40 a month minimum and was de-
feated, 91 to 19. Representative Sam
Massingale, Democrat, Oklahoma,
lowered the figure to $32 but was
turned down 74 to 49.
Tlie chamber was then thrown
into turmoil when Representative
M. C. Tarver, Democrat. Georgia,
proposed that wage differentials be
eliminated.
It was an embarrassing situation
for Democratic leaders. Last week
they supported a petition to blast
from the hostile rules committee,
Which is controlled by Southern
Democrats, the wages and hours
bill which provided no wage dif-
ferentials as -between the North
and the South'.
Supporting Tarver’s amendment,
Representative Martie Dies, Demo-
crat, Texas, one of the committee’s
conservative bloc, taunted the lead-
ers as did Representative Sam D.
McReynolds, Democrat, Tennessee,
■another foe of the wages bill who,
when the Tarver proposal lost, 78
to 57, introduced an amendment to
eliminate differentials for Interned-
I rate, skilled and technical WPA
workers.
The McReynolds amendment lost,
105 to 50.
As approved, the measure appro-
priates $1.250,000,000 to continue
WPA relic” until Feb. 1, 1939; *965,-
000,000 for PWA projects and au-
thorizes continuation of the $500,-
000,000 PWA revolving fund; $75,-
000,000 for itlie national youth ad-
ministration; $175,000,000 for the
farm security administration; $250,-
000 for the national emergency
council and between *300,000,000
and $500,000,000 for housing pro-
jects.
The total will exceed $5,000,000,-
000 and will set a new peace-time
appropriations record of $11,000,-
000,000 for one session of congress.
-o-
Lonely Ethiopia-
in September.
IT’S FUN (AND EASY) IO DWHOP
YOUR OWN FILMS
moi
star
Sht
•S
Jus
Complete kit as shown above S3.5Q. Send
10c coin or stamps lor latest catalog oi
photo specialties.
Wm. J. GRACE
620 COLLEGE DALLAS
c
tiv
tiii
s
or
•Ip
(Continued from Page One)
Selassie’s fight to prevent world
recognition of Rome's conquest
found little sympathy. He stood for
a few moments defending himself
but was too weak from effects of
influenza and heart trouble to con-
tinue and his chief league delegate,
L. A. Taezaz, read for him from
manuscript in rapid French.
Whatever the league and the
world might do, the negus told the
statesmen, his people will fight un-
til they have driven the Italians
TEXAN ADS GET RESULTSI
Finest equipment, and 26
years experience in taking
care oT your optical re- g
quirements. The finest lens-
es make the world look
better.
DR. V. R. JONES
Optometrist
214 N. Main St.—Shamrock
‘GENTLEMEN—PLEASE-ONE AT A TIME’
Rugby is making headway In
Russia and Moscow now has seven
clubs.
W. E. ANTRIM, Managing Director
MEXICO CITY
1
0.
ERSKIN SHERWOOD
SERVICE STATION
Magnolia Products
Washing & Lubrication
Our Specialty
2nd & Madden — Shamrock

Show all pages in this issue.

This issue can be searched. Note: Results may vary based on the legibility of text within the document.

Tools / Downloads

Get a copy of this page .

Citing and Sharing

Basic information for referencing this web page. We also provide extended guidance on usage rights, references, copying or embedding.

Reference the current page of this Newspaper.

Bones, Percy. The Shamrock Texan (Shamrock, Tex.), Vol. 35, No. 4, Ed. 1 Friday, May 13, 1938, newspaper, May 13, 1938; Shamrock, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth526360/m1/4/ocr/: accessed November 12, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Shamrock Public Library.

International Image Interoperability Framework (This Page)