The Shamrock Texan (Shamrock, Tex.), Vol. 34, No. 99, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 2, 1937 Page: 1 of 8

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BOXHOLDER
3,155 COPIES PRINTED TODAY!
QhfcSHAMROCK
Crisis In Undeclared
War Believed Near As
Japanese Start
rive
The time is about here for us to
throw a celebration in honor of F
E. Stevens for ironing out some of
the bumps on the Rock Island
crossing on South Main street as
* the three or four buckets of asphalt
or whatever they use, have already
been poured and you can once more
drive across the tracks without dan-
ger of swallowing your false teeth.
“Steve”, typical of railroad men,
•made the crossing smooth enough
to satisfy motorists and at the
same time left it rough enough so
Gerald Mayfield. Jack Nichols and
the other tire dealers seem perfect-
ly contented.
We are not going to make this
“road" celebration as large as the
one Wellington threw on completion
of paving on U. S. 83, but we do
plan to touch off two or three 5c
»packages of firecrackers as a salute
to “Steve.” And about all the guests
we plan to invite are Mayor Bill
Walker. City Councilman Royce
Lewis, and Horace Belew. Bill and
Royce led the fight for the big pro-
*ject from the official standpoint
wlille Horace and JAUB represent-
ed the forgotten Southside motor-
ists.
In deference to the wishes of
“Steve” and other Rock Island of-
ficials. the celeh- > 'n will probably
be held on Labo, i
Thanks to Earl Mitchel, the new
owner of the Clydoc cafe, for invit-
ing the entire Texan staff to come
*out and eat Royal Pig sandwiches
at his expense. We are coming out,
Earl, the first night all of our
families and all of the carrier boys
and their families can get off at
the same time. And we regret there
*will be so many of us that eight
or ten carloads will have to ask
for curb service. Having watched
our carriers down hamburgers and
Coneys, we suggest they come in-
side and the older ones stay in th'‘‘
*cars, what do you think?
We wish The Texan crew got
along with the filling stations out
on highway 66 as well as we do
the cafes. John Nunn al the U-
t Drap*Tnn haa been swbll Eu US srtd
we believe he or Earl either would
be willing to write our meals for
a week or so on the cuff—anyway
we intend to try. But do those filling
stations out on the highway ever
# offer to fill up our tank with free
gas? You are correct.
In fact, some of the stations are
continually and eternally mad at all
of us because we don’t buy gas and
oil from them. In this -connection
*we believe filling stations solicit
business harder than anybody in
town. They all want The Texan's
business because they spend a few
dollars a year for advertising. We
have figured up if we took time
• about trading with all the stations
in town, we would buy three quarts
of gas a month from each of them
which would net them in the neigh-
borhood of two cents.
In this connection we wonder how
« many filling stations and other
business men threaten to turn off
their gas, lights and water because
tlie fellows working for those com-
panies don’t happen to trade with
them?
NEA
NEWS
PICTURES
£XA
Sample
Copy
Farm Conference
Is Slated
VOL. 34
SHAMROCK, WHEELER COUNTY, TEXAS, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1937
NO. 99
Seven Wounded as Planes Bomb American Liner
AnDroachine within 50 miles of Shanghai after a trip to Manila with American women
dren refugees the Dollar liner President Hoover was attacked and bombed ihree times by four
planes reported to have been Chinese. Seven members of the crew were wounded, two seriously.
The ship made port under its own power. In the picture above the artist has indicated approx-
imately where the bomb- struck.
More Than 1,000 Men
And Boys Attend Farm
Picnic On Kelly Ranch
We have told you before but we
are going to tell you again. It is
a violation of the state law to pass
a school bus, parked on a highway
to load or unload pupils. You must
» bring your car to a full and com-
plete stop, and what is more it is
compulsory that the driver of a
school bus take down your license
number and report it to county of-
ficers.
* War» your family and friends
about this law. Several people have
been compelled to pay fines for
violating this law, even though in
complete Ignorance of It.
—JAUn
* Congratulations to Lyle Holmes,
Cliff Hofmann and the officials and
members of Cole Creek Country
club on the success of the big in-
vitation tournament. We talked with
several out-of-town visitors and
4 they all said it was the best ar-
ranged and most successful tourna-
ment they had ever attendee! in a
city of Shamrock’s size.
The only criticism we have to of-
fer, personnally, Is that Lyle was
* permitted to work up the list of
prisas In advance of the meet.
We are not saying this to criticize
Lyle as it was the perfectly natural
thing to do, to offer the best prize
for winner of the championship
’ flight and then prooeed to win it
himself. We also believe O. T. Nich-
olson would be better working at
the end of the 18 holes than as of-
ficial starter at the beginning and
furthermore that the tournament
would be fairer for all concerned if
all the golfers were required to wear
the same kind of uniforms instead
of letting each golfer decide what
kind of a costume he wanted to play
« in.
NEGRO IS GIVEN
DEATH SENTENCE
REPUDIATES COOTSjjMON OF
CRIMINAL ASSAULT ON
WHITE FARM WOMAN
LIVINGSTON, Sept. 2. — Bob
White, 28-year-old negro who re-
pudiated a confession that he crim-
inally attacked Mrs W. S. Cochran
was convicted Wednesday by a dis-
trict court jury and assessed the
death penalty.
Mrs. Cochran, mother of two
small boys and wife of a prominent
Polk County farmer and ranchman,
testified at White’s trial that the
negro assaulted her.
Spectators were barred from the
courtroom during her testimony.
White denied the charge and
claimed that Texas Rangers had
bound him to a tree, beat him and
forced him to confess the crime.
His written confession was read at
the trial.
The jury deliberated less than two
hours.
Mrs. Cochran was attacked in her
home 12 miles west of here on the
night Of August 10 while her hus-
band was visiting in Houston on
business.
The courthouse was guarded heav-
ily by Sheriff R. D. Holliday, 100
deputies and Texas Rangers as sev-
eral hundred persons gathered dur-
ing the trial, which lasted two
days.
ABILENE* IS
WINNERJN CONTEST
“NEOLECTRES8” WORD COINED
TO FIT HOUSEWIFE IN
ELECTRICAL AGE
As evidence that West Texas wom-
en have “time on their hands” as
a result of modem conveniences, an
Abilene “housewife”—who has lei-
sure moments available for a joint
hobby, registered Boston bulldogs,
with her husband—today was cre-
dited by Dr. Charles Earle Funk,
New York lexicographer, with orig-
inating a new name for her sex,
“neolec tress.”
Mrs. Ben D. Parker, 2126 Grape
(Continued on Last Page)
• —........—o-
LONE STAR INSTALLS
COMPRESSOR STATION
Fun and frolic combined with
serious discussions of agricultural
problems to make the annual Far-
mers “Round-Up” on Kelly brothers
ranch, northwest of Wheeler, Wed-
nesday night a memorable occasion
for more than 1,000 Wheeler coun-
ty farmers, their sons, and guests.
The festivities got unuer way at
2:30 o’clock in the afternoon, with
dominoes, horse shoe and dollar
pitching the chief diversions. Those
who did not care to participate in
or watch these amusements, just
visited and all had a grand time.
At 5:30 p. m. the big barbecue was
RESETTLEMENT
ADMINISTRATION
IS REORGANIZED
WALLACE NAMES ALEXANDER
TO HEAD FEDERAL FARM
TANACY PROGRAM
SUGAR QUOTA ACT
BECOMES LAW AS
ROOSEVELT SIGNS
HYDE PARK, N. Y., Sept. 2.—
President Roosevelt last night sign-
ed the sugar quota bill, but with an
understanding that the “unholy al-
liance between the cane and beet
growers on the one hand and the
seaboard refining monopoly on the
other, has been terminated by the
growers.’
In a statement bitterly assailing
the bill’s provisions to restrict re-
fined imports from Hawaii, Puerto
Rico and the Virgin islands for an-
other two and a half years, the
president said the measure’s value
had been seriously impaired in value
by legalizing a “virtual monopoly
in the hands of a small group of
seaboard refiners.”
Given Assurances
He added, however, he had re
ceived assurances from responsible
leaders of the senate and house.
Without mentioning an extra ses-
sion, the president expressed the
hope the next session would con-
sider “repealing or shortening the
clause (restricting refined imports)
Congressman Marvin Jones( above),
recently returned from Washington,
will be in Wheeler county Friday,
September 17, at 2:30 o’clock for a
conference with farmers on agri-
cultural problems, he informed
County Agent Jake Tarter in a
telephone conversation Monday. The
meeting will be held in the district
court room at Wheeler, with all
farmers, farm women and the gen-
eral public cordially invited to at-
tend.
SHANGHAI, Sept. 2.—Heavily
reinforced Japanese early today
blasted at Chinese concentration*
to open the way for a drive over
the entire Shanghai front.
Hostilities in this sector, now
nearing the end of the third week,
seemed pointed toward an immin-
ent climax.
Fires lighted the skies as Japanese
war planes dropped incendiary
bombs in an effort to clear out Chi-
nese from the Hongkew area, north
of the International Settlement,
while naval gunners shelled adja-
cent Chapel.
Chinese Airdromes Warned
The new Japanese drive designed
to clear Chinese forces out of the
entire lower Yangtze River Valley
followed a warning from the Jap-
anese navy it was extending opera-
tions to all China.
A spokesman said the navy in-
tended to launch air attacks against
all Chinese airdromes and bases of
military operations.
The Japanese navy also warned
all foreign shipping to steer clear
of Japanese naval concentrations in
the Whangpoo River and the Yang-
tze Estuary, the avenue of escape
for evacuating refugees, and an-
nounced future developments may
(Continued on Page 5)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 2,-Secre-
tary Wallace reorganized the Re-
settlement Administration Wednes-
day to carry out the new Federal
Farm Tenancy program
The name of Resettlement was
changed to “Farm iweurity Admin-
istration.”
Wallace told a press conference
that Dr. W. W Alexander, chief of
the Resettlement Administration,
would head the new Farm Security
Administration.
The secretary also announced for-
mation of a Farmers’ Home Cor-
served. Appetites whetted by thej poration to carry out provisions of
afternoon's activities, five barbe- the tenancy program,
cued beeves were consumed by the Alexander, Harry L. Brown, as
gathering. sistant secretary of agriculture, and
Music by a string band launched a. G. Black, chief of the Bureau of
a fine program at 7:30 p. m. Eugene Agricultural Economics, were named
Worley of Shamrock, state represen- directors of this corporation and
tative from this district, ably dis- j advisors on the board farm relief
cused state and national legislation, program.
No New Constriction
Wallace said the Rirm Security
Administration would concentrate
on loans and rehabilitation for far-
mers and abandon model communi-
'Continued on Page 4)
Work was started this week on
the new gas compressor on the Lone
Star Gas company's line, one-fourth
mile north of the camp location.
Five families were moved to Sham-
rock by the company for the period
of construction, about 90-days.
The compressor station Is being
Installed for the purpose of main-
taining uniform pressure on the 18-
inch Lone Star line from the gas
field to PetrbUa.
A jig dance by Charley Melton and
cowboy songs by J. Biard drew pro-
longed applause.
A short talk by J. B. Clark, Sham-
rock attorney, which was a mixture
of philosophy and fun was well re-
ceived, the speaker’s talent as a
story teller drawing many hearty
laughs. A violin solo by Glenn A.
Truax, Shamrock band director, and
a guitar duet by the Mt, Zion “Skil-
lett Llckers” followed.
The necessity for farmers to or-
ganize in order hold a position on
a par with other industries was ably
discussed by C. H. Day of Plain-
view, vice-president of the Texas
Agricultural association. Day was
introduced by Melvin Pillers of
Twltty.
The address was followed by two
vocal numbers by the Cooper quar-
tet of Davis community. Remarks
by Mr, Deck, Perryton farm leader,
and more music closed the program.
FORMER PM TO
CONDUCT REVIVAL
REV. J. J- GRUBBS COMING
FOR MEETING ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
Rev. J. J. Grubbs of Carlsbad,
New Mexico, first pastor of the As-
sembly of God church when it was
organized here in 1929, will return
to the city to conduct a revival, be-
ginning Sunday night, September 5,
it was announced today by the pas-
tors, Rev. and Mrs. Lloyd Pranks.
The meeting will be held at the
church, located at Madden and
Fifteenth streets.
Many Shamrock people have ex-
pressed a desire to again hear Rev.
Grubbs, who made a host of friends
during his stay here, and this re-
vival will afford them the oppor-
tunity to do so.
Rev. Grubbs, who was pastor here
for six years, has served for the past
18 months as secretary-treasurer of
the Texico district council of As-
sembly of God churches. He has
(Continued cn Last Page)
HEAVY DEATH TOLL
FEARED IN TYPHOON
SHIPS ADRIFT, WATERFRONT
FLOODED AS HIGH WIND
LASHES HONG KONG
HONGKONG, Sept. 2. (Thursday)
—The most violent typhoon since
1926 struck Hongkong early today,
and a heavy death toll was feaied
as reports of widespread destruction
began coming in.
Four ships in the harbor sent out
SOS calls. The Japanese liner Asa-
mu Maru was aground in Junk Bay
and the Kausing was aground off
Green Island.
The harbor was crowded with
shipping, including liners sheltering
here because of the Japanese block-
ade of China’s coast. The Chinese
steamer “On Lee” piled up, first
reports said, and a govennent tug
was set adrift.
A witness said he saw scores of
Chinese struggling in the water, ap-
parently having been forced from
their ships. Waterfront shops were
flooded waist deep, and revenue of-
ficers assisted civilians, many of
whom had been trapped in crowded
buddings along narrow streets.
Details still were meager, because
the storm struck in darkness and a
thorough check of damage and pos-
sible loss of lives had not yet been
made.
--o —......
SHOWER AMOUNTS TO -34
A light shower, which fell In
the Shamrock vicinity this morn-
ing about 6 o’clock, freshened
growing crops In the area affect-
ed and served to cool the atmos-
phere. Precipitation ' to
.34 of an inch, aecor lj'f to Vm
rain gauge at the Tt J, n f.
press.
Continued on Page 4)
HUNT FORKING
PLANE FRUITLESS
VAST AREA CRISS-CROSSED
BY PLANE SQUADRONS,
GROUND CREWS
GRAPELAND, Sept. 2.—Weary
searchers trudged through pine
forests and rugged terrain east of
Grapeland last night in hopes of
finding some clews as to the fate
of Flying Cadet Guy W. Edgerton
of Kelly Field, Texas, missing since
Monday night.
The ground parties, made up of
CCO enrollees, Boy Scouts and resi-
dents, renewed with vigor their
search after an Army flier, one of
168 which participated in Texas’
greatest aerial hunt, reported seeing
a fire ruins and an object resem-
bling an airplane wheel near the
lumbering community of Weches, 20
miles northeast of Grapeland. The
flier dropped a message and chart
locating the spot.
A wooded area 10 miles from
Shreveport also was ordered search-
ed after another flier reported see-
ing an object resembling a wrecked
plane. The cadet was a member of a
13-plane formation which became
separated Monday night during a
thunderstorm while en route from
Barksdale Field, Louisiana, to Kelly
Field, San Antonio.
Approximately a half of the State
was criss-crossed by the Army sky
fleet today before the search was
interfered with by bumpy weather
in this section. Yesterday 72 planes
scanned hundreds of miles of ter-
ritory.
BRITISH FLEET
IN SEARGH FOR
MYSTERIOUS SUB
UNDERSEA CRAFT WHICH FIRED
TORPEDO AT DESTROYER
IS ORDERED SUNK
LONDON, Sept. 2.—A British war
fleet searched the Mediterranean
last night with bared guns and of-
ficial freedom to sink an unidenti-
fied submarine that fired a torpedo
at the destroyer Havock.
Quarters close to the admiralty in-
dicated that the mysterious subma-
rine would be sunk if possible. The
government considered such a step
“entirely Justified” after the subma-
rine’s crew has been removed.
Britain was inoensed by the at-
tack off the Spanish coast, the
latest of a series of raids on ships
flying the British flag on the em-
pire “lifeline.” There was mounting
pressure on the government to stif-
fen its resistance to “these promis-
cuous acts of barbarism.”
At least eight swift destroyers
were rushed into the search and
each commander was told explicitly
that he was free to use his own
Judgment.
All the destroyers were equipped
with depth charges capable of sink-
ing a submerged submarine and guns
heavy enough to blast it off the
surface.
An unknown number of other
warships sped into the western Med-
iterranean near where the Havock
ENROLLMENT FOR
SCHOOL STUDENTS
UNDER WAV TODAY
ASSIGNMENT OF TEACHERS TO
CLASSES ANNOUNCED BY
SUPT. PERKINS
SERVICE FOR LABOR
DAY IS ANNOUNCED
EMPLOYEES AND EMPLOYERS
INVITED TO ATTEND BY
METHODIST PASTOR
In announcing special services In
observance of Labor Day at the
First Methodist church Sunday
evening at 8 o’clock, Rev. Lance
Webb addresses the following open
letter of Invitation to all employers
and employees of Shamrock:
“We have received a noble heri-
tage from our forefathers who gave
us all we have through honest work,
as tollers, men of the soil, men of
the wilderness trail. Men who were
broad-backed and brown-handed,
with empires in their brains,’
wrought with ax and plow and
rifle, and most of all, with the vi-
sion of their own hearts to win a
continent and make it blossom like
a rose.
“Today, we live in a more com-
plex world, in which the noise of
capital and labor disputes resounds
with dire forebodings of the future.
Can ws learn the secret of coopera-
tion, and work together for the com-
mon good of all to build a mighty
nation or happy freemen? Or must
we go the way of fang, tooth and
(Continued on Last Page)
High school enrollment got un-
der way this morning with students,
whose family names begin with A
through H, signing up for the 1937-
38 term. Friday morning students
whose names begin with I through
Q, and all students from rural dis-
tricts, will enroll. Monday, those
whose names start with R through
Z will sign up for their courses.
Football boys, who are it camp, may
report Monday morning at the hour
of 9, Supt. W. C. Perkins announced.
Junior High enrollment will he held
Monday meriting. t
All public schools will open for
the tern; Monday morning with the
time schedule practically the same
last year. First bell at 8:40 a. m.,
classes starting at 8:50. The noon
hour will be from 11:50 to 12:40 and
school will be dismissed at 3:30 p.m.
Perkins announced a genera) fa-
culty meeting would be held at the
high school auditorium Saturday
morning at 10 a. m. with every
faculty member to be present.
A complete line-up of the teach-
ing staff was announced by Perkins
this morning as follows: High school,
(Continued on Last Page)
(Continued on Page 5)
FLAMING AUTO IS
DEATH TRAP FOR 6
SIXTH VICTIM DIES AFTER
MACHINE CRASHES INTO
SIDE OF TRUCK
MINCO, Okla., Sept. 2.—A fiery
crash of an automobile and a truck
near here took its sixth life yester-
day—Private Edward C. Thomas of
Joplin, Mo., whose two Fort Sill
soldier companions and their three
girl friends were killed almost In-
stantly.
Undersherlff J. W. Hite of Grady
County identified one of the girl
victims as Hazel Wall, 16, of Te-
cumseh.
(Continued on Page 6)
SCOUTS WILL CAMP
ON BRITTS RANCH
Shamrock boy scouts will leave
Friday afternoon for a two-day
camping trip to the Britt ranch
near Wheeler, Jack Shull, scoutmas-
ter announced today. He urges the
boys who are going, be In front of
the F. and M. Bank butlding before
2 p. m. Friday.
Lee Wallace, former scoutmaster,
will be In charge of the group and
members of the scout committee will
attend the camp Saturday and Sun-
day. Boys are requested to bring
their cooking utengtls, food, and
bedding.
By caddying in the golf tourna-
ment Inst week, the scout* made
enough to buy tunts for the entire
troop.
CAEOOGRANT TO BE
USED IN GAS LINES
HARMLESS PREPARATION WILL
WARN OF LEAKS, STATU
COMPANY OFFICIALS
Starting Monday, September 8.
“Calodorant” will be introduced into
the mains of the Shamrock Gas
company, in compliance with House
Bill 1017, requiring all gas delivered
to consumers in this state be treat'
ed with an odorant, as a protection
i!»sinst dangerous leaks.
B. F. II limes, manager of the gas
company, made the announcement
today and stated that this odorant
is strictly a safety precaution
against leaks and in no way af-
fects the qualities of combustion nor
will it affect the meter registra-
tion or gas heaters.
"Calodorant" is neither poisonous
nor nauseating, but a harmless
odorant which will protect your
property against gas leakage. The
company will highly appreciate cus-
tomers notifying them at once
should any disagreeable odor in or
near their premises be detected and
their service men will Immediately
attempt to locate any teaks and
correct the trouble.
-o-
CAFE HAS SPECIAL
SANDWICH PROCESS
Mr. and Mr*. Earl Mitchel! who
recently bought the Clydoc Cafe on
66 highway, announce they have ob-
tained the special process for mak-
ing Royal Pig Sandwiches, which
will be an exclusive feature at their
cafe.
Mitchel! who for many years was
in the grocery business, buys only
the finest foods on the market, and
every order receives special atten-
tion. They make fine steaks _
cialtjr and invite yon to
friends to the Clydoc to mt.

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Bones, Percy. The Shamrock Texan (Shamrock, Tex.), Vol. 34, No. 99, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 2, 1937, newspaper, September 2, 1937; Shamrock, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth526434/m1/1/ocr/: accessed July 30, 2021), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Shamrock Public Library.

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