The Shamrock Texan (Shamrock, Tex.), Vol. 37, No. 37, Ed. 1 Monday, September 16, 1940 Page: 2 of 8

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THE SHAMROCK TEXAN. Shamrock. Texas
THE SHAMROCK TEXAN
Published Every Monday and Thursday
Afternoon by Albert Cooper, Ted Rogers
*nd Arval Montgomery. 407 N. Main St.
MAYOR LA GUARDIA
SERVES AS SPONSOR
Albert Cooper _ Publisher
Arval Montgomery Editor
Virginia Anderson - Society Editor
J. C. Howell ............. Local Advertising
Ted Rogers ------------ Mechanical Supt.
PHONE 160
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Multi
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warn
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Panhand
Texas Pi
National
MEMBER
lc Press A880
ress Associatio
Editorial As
elation
n
Bociation
Entered at the post office at Shamrock.
Texas, as second-class matter under Act
oX March 3, 1079. Subscription Kate by
Mall, In Wheeler and adjoining counties,
$1.60 per year; elsewhere 02.00. By Carrier
Delivery, 5c per week. It Is our desire to
five subscribers prompt and satisfactory
service and we will appreciate your noti-
fying us whenever the paper Is missed.
Mayor Florello H. La-
Guardia of New York City,
recently appointed chairman
of the American section of
the 0. S.-Canada Joint Per-
manent Defense Board, has
accepted an invitation to
serve as a sponsor of Bun-
dles for Britain, Inc., Amer-
ican organization sending
clothing, medical supplies
and equipment to Great
Britain.
Other prominent men
sponsoring the organization
include Former Governor Al-
fred E. Smith, William
Green, president of the A. F.
of L.; Gene Tunney, former
heavyweight champion;
Charles R. Hook, president
of the American Rolling Mill
Co., and Lowell Thomas.
Monday, September 16, 1940
ST
Ed iforiii I
Among Youngest
As Twins Meet
Views of Contemporaries
SSiiiiimmiimMiiMimiiitHiMHimiiiiimMiHmiiiituiiiiMMiiiiHiiiiiiiiiHHiiiunujiiiinuiiiHiiitHiuiiiisiiiiiiiiiiinSS j
NOTICE TO PUBLIC
Any erroneous reflection upon the char-
acter, standing or reputation of any per-
son, firm or corporation, which may ap-
pear in the columns of this paper will be
gladly corrected upon due notcle being
given to the editor personally at the office
at 407 North Main 8t., Shamrock, Texas,
SOUND
INTERNATIONALISM
m

mw-1
A Japanese scientist, Tadashi
Senkoku, believes that the sap of
the banyan tree, which grows abun-
dantly in American possessions, will
become a new source of rubber. As-
suming of course that further re-
search confirms this opinion, the
Japanese scientist will have made
an invaluable contribution not only
to the United States but to many
other parts of the world.
Even if the production of rubber
from the banyan tree should not
prove feasible, industrial research
is providing a synthetic substitute
for rubber. Either result will rescue
the United States from an unfortu-
nate predicament in which this
country is dependent principally up-
on the Dutch East Indies for its
rubber supply. At the same time,
nylon as a silk substitute is making
Inroads into the American market
for natural silk which Japan sup-
plies.
The reported discovery by the
Japanese Senkoku illustrates the
sound internationalism which has
always prevailed in science and the
arts. Even Industry is no longer na-
tionalistic but spreads throughout
the world, and commerce among all
nations when based on mutuality
and enlightenment is entirely feas-
ible. The intense nationalism, which
is Inspired by the aggressor dicta-
tors, is an outworn belief which sci-
ence, the arts, religion, and even
industry at times have long ago re-
pudiated.
The conquests of the intensely na-
tionalistic dictators have cast
gloom over the hopes that a sane
and enlightened internationalism
lies ahead for the world to end its
troubles. But wars and depressions
can not set aside the conviction of
many persons that the ways of sci-
ence, the arts, religion and inven-
tion ultimately will prevail in a
troubled world. Resolute persons of
vision diagnose the violent disturb-
ances caused by aggression as the
rigor mortis of selfish nationalism.
Under that theory, Hitler and his
kind would be the last of the con-
querors.
Wits End
Virginia
Anderson
EYE FOB AN EYE—
For the second consecutive week
the editor of the Herald has received
a pamphlet "Facts in Review” dis-
tributed through the mails from the
German Library of Information in
^ New York City. Tolerancy of this
sort on the part of Uncle Sam is
nothing short of foolhardy, especial-
ly in the face of the knowledge that
If such a practice were attempted in
Germany, the effort not only would
be strictly forbidden, but in all
probability, open suicide. Let's keep
this thing on a 50-50 basis —Jack
Stamper in TULIA HERALD.
FRIDAY THE 13TH—
Superstitious? Then beware -for
tomorrow is Friday the 13th.
The only solution we can find for
such people on such a day is for
! them to crawl into a hole and pull
the hole in after them.
I Let’s hope that your Friday the
J 13th isn't like that of the man who
walked under the ladder just as a
_ black cat crossed his path and ar-
fetish of Americanism. The average l rived home learn that hls h0Use
American is just average and a very ; had Just burned down_ his wife had
funny fellow. He obeys the law, or ; eloped with the iceman, and his dog
had bitten the neighbor’s kid. Of
TAXES—
There are upwards of 125 million
dollars in delinquent taxes in Tex-
as. Efforts are made sporadically to
collect back taxes, but the amount
seems to grow with each succeeding
year. A more hard-boiled attitude
on collecting current taxes might
solve future problems, but no one
seems to know how to collect taxes
after they have become too long de-
linquent. With valuations above
what the property will bring, it does
not take long for the amount of
back taxes to be larger than the
property will bring at forced sale.—
T. A. Landers in McLEAN NEWS.
America is now muddling in a ‘
A SERIOUS CONFLICT—
The gentleman with a face a yard
long you saw standing on the cor-
ner the other day had not lost hls
last friend, nor even his last nickel.
He's the fellow who'd just discovered
the Coyotes open their football sea-
son with Masonic Home on the same
night the circus comes to town.
You can wire your congressman or
write a nasty letter to the editor,
3,000 Of Nation’s Best '
Marksmen To Meet For
Greatest Arms Tourney
ti
Mi
mm
Among youngest at international
twin convention in St. Louis,
Mo., were Jacqueline, left, and
Jeannette Cooke of Brentwood,
Mo., shown with their mother,
Mrs. David Cookek, above. The
twins are 10 months old.
at least he says he does except for
a few minor traffic violations; he
donates to charity; he pays taxes;
he goes to church; he knows the
first lines of the preamble to the
constitution and the Gettysburg ad-
dress; he knows that Patrick Henry
said “Give me liberty or give me
death”; can remember offhand
(with a little prompting) the first
verse of the national anthem and
wonders why in thunder they always
pitch it so high; has very little if
any Idea how laws are made and
GIVE GRASS A CHANCE—
More than 30 years ago, this was
one of the best 'grassed' sections in
West Texas. There were seven types
of gramma, buffalo and two kinds
, . . , of mesquite. Today the varieties are
says we have too many laws already Umlted to ctlre(; main varieUes.
and that's why we're such a lawless' },ears wc have wlId Some clalm
AllTrlr A n A • vtx An»A f aa t*AAAt*/in a»
course, he wasn’t exactly convinced
of hls bad luck until hls best friend
wrecked hls automobile on his way
to tell him that he had lost his job.
— Bill Sercomb in CLARENDON
NEWS.
TIMES.
CAGES AND MEN
The city of New York is planning
a new zoo. It’s to be a different kind
of zoo, without the orderly rows of
confining cages usually associated
with zoological gardens.
Instead of being kept in bare-
fioored cages, the animals are to be
kept as far as possible in surround-
ings which resemble those of their
natural habitat. They will be sep-
arated from the spectators by walls
and ditches, a plan which has been
tested and found satisfactory in Eu-
rope.
It’s an interesting experiment, one
that should make both the animals
and the spectators happier. Also, it
should make the zoo a more educa-
tional place for visitors.
But it does provide a sharp con-
trast that isn't very flattering to the
human race. At a time when ani
mals are being given more freedom,
millions of humans in Europe and
Asia and elsewhere are being put
back into confinement.
Comparatively few of them are
literally behind bars. Many arc in
concentration camps. And millions
more have lost tire right to work
and worship and to speak as they
choose—almost to think for them-
Having lost the liberties which the
— —’ states Declaration of Inde-
__called their “Inalienable
right,” they are imprisoned and cag-
ed just as effectively as if they were
behind iron bars.
oppressors, less “humane”
i the animals, see to that.
. let’s have no more talk about
___4 returning to the ape. We’re li-
belling the simians with such com-
ment—after all, the ape does noth-
ing more destructive to his fellows
throw coconuts
-o-
do not hunger for a well-stored
mind,
I only wish to live my life, and
find
My heart to unison with all
outfit, ha, ha; knows the records of
every football player in the major
teams and has a thorough knowl-
edge of rules and regulations of hls
favorite sports; would scream with
terror If anyone suggested he join a
class to study the constitution of
the United States, says he works
hard all day and likes to relax in
hls spare time; and while he Is re-
laxing he discusses national and in-
ternational affairs with his friends
and wonders why in the world “those
birds in Europe let a man like Hitler
romp all over them,” and why Con-
gress doesn’t do something about
something he wants them to do
something about; doesn't read his-
tory or the life of any great Amer-
ican because fine print hurts his
eyes, but instead enjoys adventure
and detective stories because they
aren’t in fine print; forgives his
own trespasses but likes other tres-
pasers to be punished; gives to his
church but doesn’t like for the min-
ister to insinuate he is in the same
class with all the other sinners;
wants the people he helps elect to
office to be honest and do the right
thing so he won’t be bothered with
having to meet issues, he “has wor-
ries enough without the whole coun-
try on his shoulders”; wants his
friends to agree with him on poli-
tics, sports and play good golf; he
takes his freedom as a matter of
course, a thing that is due him, a
thing that the government should
protect for him, little realizing he
is a cipher in the government and
It is he who should protect his own
liberty; he just wants to enjoy life
and be let alone and not have to
spend all hls time worrying about
what the country is coming to.
And he is really a very nice fel-
low. He Is just a little lazy about
doing his own thinking.
this was brought in during the dust
bowl era. Others deny this, saying
that wild rye has always been here.
At this time in my yard is crow-
foot gramma heading out. It was
late due to dry weather, but this
variety always makes seed unless
over-grazed. It was common in this
section some 30 years ago. Now it
is only found on the sub-irrigated
sections of the canyons. When the
time comes that our stockmen Im-
port grass seed and spread it over
the ranges, there wilj^be good grass
again. Dry weather got it. — J. C.
Estlack in DONLEY COUNTY
LEADER.
CHICKEN THIEVES—
My friend R. N. Beckum seems
to have been visited by chicken
thieves lately, for he sent me a note
with a request to print. I don’t like
the inference as it appears Beckum
thinks chicken thieves read my com-
ments. Anyway, here is his note;
“To the chicken thieves of Mem-
phis—What few chickens you left
we sold them to Mr. Couch, the pro-
duce man. So you will find them
there if he hasn’t already sold them.
But you had better be careful, for
I think he shot a fellow one time for
stealing his chickens, and if he did-
n’t he ought to have. —R. N.
Beckum, 618 North 13th street.”—
J. Claude Wells in MEMPHIS DEM-
OCRAT.
| action taken in the senate.
I Even now, Love’s voice and man-
| ner are much more mature than his
years. He has aimed for eight years
at a political career, after a begin-
ning as a 13-year-old speaking for
Gov. Ross Sterling. In his first po-
litical race. Love defeated a veteran
legislator, B. T. (Nub) Johnson
The newcomer is well-known in
Austin, and announced that he had
definite ideas about his new job.
Two days after the returns were in, I
he went to Austin to inquire why |
most of the state’s employes here
came from cities other than Fort
CAMP PERRY, O. — When tins
week closes, Uncle Sam will be able
to chalk up about 3,000 first-line in-
structors in rifle marksmanship that
he doesn’t have right now. Approxi-
mately this number of small-arms
experts will be graduated in this
year’s classes at the National
Matches Small Arms Firing School,
held annually here at Camp Perry
in connection with the world’s
greatest anns tournament.
Throughout its history, the United
States has enjoyed the reputation
among European army officials of
being “a nation of marksmen,” and
the U. S. Army, under tile acid test
of actual combat, has always borne
out this reputation. But the high
command realizes that this enviable
position can be maintained only by
constant propagation of instruction
in the handling of the rifle and pis-
tol, and that laxity in this work
might permit a nation of marksmen
to deteriorate In one generation or
even less time.
Hence the active sponsorship and
good wishes of the War Department
for the National Rifle Association's
nationwide meet, held here every
summer on a specialized develop-
ment of firing ranges along the Lake
Erie shoreline. The NRA, composed
of gun clubs scattered throughout
the continental United States and
its possessions, annually brings the
cream of Its membership to Camp
Perry to compete for national indi-
vidual and team titles. And the Ar-
my snaps up the opportunity to cor-
rall these experts all at the same
time and in the same place, and
make marksmanship teachers out of
them.
The War Department also takes
the occasion to hold its most im-
portant military rifle matches,
bringing the highest-ranking experts
providing an entire regiment (this I
year Col. E. F. Reinhardt’s 20th SJ. I
S. Infantry—"Sykes’ Regulars”) to I
prepare and maintain the ranges, I
furnish official administrators, su-
pervisors, scorers, and statisticians. |
and promote the success of the toy
iur.
nament in any other ways posslme
Worth. |
Love—whose slogan was “Win from (he Infantry, Cavalry, Engi-
With Love"—was so confident of neers, Reserve Corps, Marine Corps,
success that he had eight bills pre- Coast Guard, and other branches to
pared for introduction at the next compete for a string of coveted tro-
legislature, even before his choice Phles.
was assured. 1 The Army further cooperates by
This year Lieut. Col. Joseph L. I
Tupper, U. S. Infantry officer, sta-
tioned at Welch, W. Va., heads the
staff of some twenty-five officers I
and enlisted men of the Army a j
are expert firing instructors, and
who will teach the art of training a
marksman to the entire contingent
of Camp Perry’s 1940 competitors j
both civilian and military. The [
course opened Sunday, SeptembeiL-,
and continues through the follow- I
lng Saturday. With an eye to the
future, the faculty set aside a spe-
cial division for Juniors—8 to 18 |
years of age, both sexes.
An Interesting feature of tLs j
year's program will be lectures, dem-
onstrations, and student firing on
the M-l rifle—the semi-automatic
weapon which has given the U. S.
Army the greatest fire-power jf r
man of any military machine, and
has brought about the much-publi- |
cized "streamlining’’ of the U. S. In-
fantry organization.
With national defense now in the I
spotlight more than at any ti£ e
since 1918, the staff of the nation’s
number one marksmanship school [
Is primed to crowd as much pro-
gress os possible into the time allot-
ted for training Its 3,000 students. |
Each pupil’s subsequent record A-
lng (Sept. 7 through Sept. 21) in the j
various brackets of the military and
NRA rifle and pistol matches will
show, as It always has in previous
years, that results were obtained.
And each graduate will return Vo
hls home—thus giving a nationwide
coverage of key men—ready and
willing to do a highly Important job
in the rapidly-expanding plan of
country Is confronted with a
tary emergency.
I this
mm-
Senate Page Will
Return To Austin
As Representative
LOOK WHAT DROPPED IN!
FEAR—
Some of the fear I used to ex-
perience as a boy when it was neces-
sary to pass a cemetery at night,
now invades my liie when I enter chuckled 'when the'chubby‘boy“ with
FORT WORTH (UP)—A familiar
voice is coming back to the staid
hall of the Texas House of Repre-
sentatives. The voice belongs to 21-
year-old Jack Love, a University of
Texas debater who was elected state
representative.
Love was a senate page for eight
years, and the spectators frequently
Up
an
a crowded department store. Women a most confldent manner. boomed
awaiting the kill at a bargain coun- hls ^ voice ,nto the house micr0_
ter have that terrifying appearance phone The port Worth youngster
of a calamity seeking some adequate Kerved as the senate>s messenger
spot In which to develop.—Douglas____
Meador in MATADOR TRIBUNE. ! TEXAN ADS GET RESULTS
ecu eoovreR"*/ w.h.W) walker
r WHAT'S THE
IDEA OF BRINGING
THE FISH BEFORE
THE SOGP?
X
JUST BETWEEN US,
THE FISH COULDN'T
WAIT ANY
LONGEP. /,
PONT WAIT AND BE
DISAPPOINTED BY NOT
DEALING WITH
W.H.<BiUMlKER
INSURANCE"
YOU'LL BE PLEASED WITH
TViElOlRELIABILITY.
ij
V--
We guess we’re an average Amer-
ican. No excuses to offer.
SMOKING And DRINKING?
WATCH YOUR STOMACH!
For quick relief from indigestion, :
heartburn and acid stomach due to ,
excessive acidity, try adla Tablets. '
Sold on money back guarantee.
Tindall Drug and Shamrock Drug Co. ;
WHOSE FAULT
Every accident between auto
and pedestrian involves liti-
gation. Be protected by bond
and actual cost with an as-
sured liability auto policy.
W.H.C#) WALKER
v
,<*Sc
■mV M
_
Try One of BRADLEY’S New HOME MADE Loaves
MAC
r
HI, MAC, GOING
BACK TO SCHOOL
2
------------
She’ll Never Know
HEY, YA PROPPED IT
OOPS -- RU3HT IN
TU6 PUDDLE
AND IT
WAS A SWELL
APPLE, TOO
f \ fs
1 j r*-'
OH WELL--1 CAN
GiV/E IT TO TEACHER/
By Boughne^
a
ii
■'

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Montgomery, Arval. The Shamrock Texan (Shamrock, Tex.), Vol. 37, No. 37, Ed. 1 Monday, September 16, 1940, newspaper, September 16, 1940; Shamrock, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth528989/m1/2/ocr/: accessed May 26, 2020), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Shamrock Public Library.

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