The Bellaire Texan (Bellaire, Tex.), Vol. 24, No. 18, Ed. 1 Wednesday, June 29, 1977 Page: 4 of 32

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I HE BELLAIRE TEXAN June 29, !97’-Pa«e
Hansen Strikes Up The Band!
Reception, Party Opens Northern Office Building
In,
TWO OF THE MAIN MINGLERS at the Hansen THE FOOD TABLE was one of the centers ot attention
reception were John Hansen himself [left] and architect on the tenth floor reception. Councilman Rod Rethwisch
is shown in the foreground.
S.I. Morris
Si
ALSO AT THE PARTY were [left to right) photographer
Peter Whitney, Burgess Pool and former Mayor Bill
Rouse. In the background beWadta jVter .1 ^ ^ ol «>« buildin« 'Ph»t»
the city.
THE COLORS WENT UP to mark the beginning of the
party and the offi
Mike McCorkle]
THE NORTHERN NATIONAL GAS BUILDING was
the reason for all the hoopla June 24 and 25 when a
reception and celebration honored the opening of
developer Hansen's building. Several city dignataries
and company officials were on hand at the Friday cocktail
party followed by the young people’s celebration
Saturday.
Service To Aging Aids WUP Elderly
Since the Bellaire city council accepted the idea of
establishing a Service to the Aged similar to West
University’s, the Texan took a look at the services the
organization and the Senior Center offer.
By JULIE HALSTEAD
“Old friends sat on their
park bench like bookends...
old men/lost in their
overcoats waiting for the
sunset...” -Paul Simon
Unfortunately, this song
from the 60s typifies
problems of the elderly in
today's youth-oriented
society. While infancy and
adolescense seem to be
thoroughly analyzed, the
years of the aged appear to
be ignored.
This is not the case in
West University Place,
however, with a population
of over 3,000 older persons.
The community, under the
direction of Mrs. Marylyn
Paxton, has developed a
program which there are
only six others like it in the
nation.
The program is called
"Service to the Aged,"
manned by volunteers who
do a variety of services
from driving a person to a
medical appointment to
clearing off a cluttered
walkway.
Why doesn’t the title refer
to “Senior Citizens?" Mrs.
Paxton put it best with
"There are no more ‘Senior’
citizens than there are
‘Junior’ citizens . . . Many
things get better with age,
like wines and cheese, and so
it is with people."
That doesn’t mean, of
course, that there aren’t
special problems that come
with aging. Physical
abilities and chemical ba
lances change, persons re-
tire from life-long profes-
sions, nearing thoughts of
death and the passing on of
friends--all these things
must be coped with, crossing
all economic and social
barriers.
Service to the Aged is
available to help either solve
or attempt to solve these
special problems. Name it,
and probably at one time or
another, they’ve handled a
similar situation.
In April 1975, a survey
was taken from West
University residents 55 or
older from which a general
list of needs were disclosed.
A Council of Aging was
formed., and it was the
recommendation from the
council to the City Commis-
sion that a service such as
this be coordinated. Thus, in
January 1976, the service
opened, directed by Mrs.
Paxton.
The official duties of the
director read "to address
her efforts on a daily basis
toward assistance of the
senior citizens of the
community assuchneeds are
individually requested. She
provides information and
referral and meets indivi-
dual need situations as they
arise."
And arise they do. One
brother and sister in the
community, one in a
wheelchair and the other in
a walker, needed the bushes
cut back from their sidewalk
leading in and out of their
home. The need was
discovered after an ambu-
lance followup visit--a ser-
vice done on the initiative of
the organization in coopera
tion with the city fire
department -and a volunteer
took care of the trimmings.
The visiting nurse service
provided by senior students
from the University of
Texas School of Nursing,
part of an ambulance
followup visit is a good way
to keep in contact with
persons who might not
otherwise take advantage of
the program, while alerting
the group of other needs the
person might require.
There are case where
persons are in need of
transportation to a medical
appointment, lost pension
checks that need to be
traced, grocery shopping for
shut-ins, special physical
fitness classes, assistance
with Medicare claim forms-
the list is endless.
Approximately 80 volun-
teers keep the program
active, by manning tele-
phone reasurrance calls,
telephone survey undates
(which is one way of keeping
information current), friend-
ly visiting, and transporta-
tion for those who are
unable to drive. Most of the
volunteers are aged persons
themselves, except for those
providing transportation
And as they come from all
walks of life, there is usually
someone to meet the various
needs that arise.
LaSalle DAC Hosts Oil Lecture
The LaSalle Chapter,
National Society Daughters
Of The American Colonist,
held a business-luncheon
meeting at the Briar Club,
3637 Westheimer, on June 9.
Guest speaker for the
offasion was Jenelle Nolan,
Attorney, East Texas Pro-
duction Division, Exxon
Company, U.S.A. Mrs.
Nolan used a series of charts
in her speech on the World
and U.S. Energy Outlook,
1977 1990. The charts in her
on Exxon’s best predictions,
furnished information on
four general areas.
The next regular meeting
of LaSalle Chapter will be on
held on October 27.
Library Plans
More Activities
For Children
The Froggie Club conti
nues for grades one through
three-read ten books to
receive a Frog Mobile.
Wednesday, June 29, 10
a.m.: Visit the Zoomobile’s
Petting Zoo at the Bellaire
Library. Two sessions will
be held but there is limited
attendance-pick up tickets
in advance.
Thursday, June 30,3 p.m.
The movie, Chimp, will be
shown. This 25 minute
Laurel and Hardy movie is
the tale of what happens
when the circus where the
comedians are working goes
out of business-the ma
nagement divides up the act
so that Ollie gets the gorilla
and Stan gets the flea circus.
Tuesday, July 5, 10:45-
11:15 a.m.: Pre-School
Story Hour.
Tuesday, July 5, 1:30
p.m.:-Learn to make a
Terrarium. For age 6 and
up bring a wide mouth
quart jar.
Wednesday, July 6, 2
p.m.: Miss Tootle-oo will
present an original story,
Medicine Man’s Treasure.
For more information on
the free summer activities,
call the Bellaire City
Library, 664 4098.
14

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Harris, John. The Bellaire Texan (Bellaire, Tex.), Vol. 24, No. 18, Ed. 1 Wednesday, June 29, 1977, newspaper, June 29, 1977; Bellaire, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth566417/m1/4/ocr/: accessed May 24, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Bellaire Friends Library & Historical Society.

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