History of the revolution in Texas, particularly of the war of 1835 & '36; together with the latest geographical, topographical, and statistical accounts of the country, from the most authentic sources. Also, an appendix. By the Rev. C. Newell. Page: 218 of 227

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206

APPENDIX.

called to the Chair, and John Moody appointed Secretary. The
object of the meeting being 'explained, the following resolutions
were adopted:Resolved,
That the People have entire confidence in the Comn
mittee of Safety, and that all their acts have the full approbation
of this meeting; and that said Committee be continued, with all
its powers.
Resolved, That we feel an entire confidence in the Constitution
and Laws of our adopted country, and will at all times sustain the
legal authorities in the exercise of their constitutional duties.
Resolved, That Thomas J. Gazley, D. C. Barrett, and Henry
P. Hill, be a Committee to draft a Circular to the Ayuntamiento
of each Municipality in the Department of Brazos upon the objects
contemplated by this meeting, and that the same be submitted to
the Committee of Safety for their approbation.
Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be signed by
the Chairman and Secretary.
THOMAS J. GAZLEY, Chairman.
JOHN MOODY, Secretary.
MINA, July 9th, 1835.
GENTLEMEN-On the 4th inst. the citizens of this Municipality
met, according to previous appointment, to consult together as to
the degree of credence that they should place in the almost numberless
reports that have been circulated among them, and the best
method of avoiding the cloud of difficulties that seemed hanging
over them.
After the maturest deliberation, they came to the conclusion
that there was certainly some reason to expect a movement of
the Government forces towards the Colonies; and the greatest
difficulty was to divine the precise object and intention of that
advance.
But they are aware that it would be the blindest credulity to
believe, to its full extent, the idle exaggerations that for some time
past have agitated the public mind. They forbear to express any
opinion whatever as to the immediate cause that wrought the present
excitements, but deplore the evils that may result from the
scisms which have taken place in consequence, and they feel, and
deeply feel, the necePsiry that there is for the existence of some
medium through which public opinion can be ascertained and
wielded with effect against the irregularities of those whose disregard
to the laws of the country has destroyed the mutual confidence,
as well as mutual respect, between them and their fellowcitizens
of the Mexican Republic, inasmuch as the misconduct of
afew designing men is attributed to the whole community, and
construed into disaffection to the General Government.

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Newell, Chester. History of the revolution in Texas, particularly of the war of 1835 & '36; together with the latest geographical, topographical, and statistical accounts of the country, from the most authentic sources. Also, an appendix. By the Rev. C. Newell., book, 1838; New York. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6109/m1/218/ocr/: accessed July 27, 2016), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .