The Normal Star (San Marcos, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 37, Ed. 1 Saturday, July 14, 1923 Page: 4 of 4

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FUNK’S
DRUG STORE
Frazier’s
7-Passenger service car
Special rates on round
trips anywhere
217—PHONE—217
DUKE & AYERS
5 TO 50o STORE
Keeps all the little things the
students want.
4Satisfaction9
Our Motto
P. O. Cafe
J.R. Watkins Products
sold by
E. W. Cartwright
of Austin Texas.
In San Marcos Friday and Mon-
day of each week, beginning Fri-
day, June 29, Your local dealer is
Mr. R. O. Blount
at the Cozy Cafe. 224 N. Austin
Phone 1 13
You Can Save
lots of money by
trading at our
store. Prices re-
duced on every-
thing.
Talbot & Son
Parlor Barber Shop
Post Office Block
Let Us Fiji
Hamburgers
At
The Cactus
Walker
Barber Shop
IF YOU DON’T KNOW
THIS SHOP—
“GET NEXT”
Hair Bobbing to Please
North Side Square.
STAR DUST
The Reason
She has the cutest
Little baby stare
And rosy cheeks,
but
She doesn’t dance
She doesn’t pet
Tho’ she’s a beaut—
That you can bet;
No dates she’s had
No boys she’s kissed;
She knows not even
What she’s missed;
She’s never done
Things most girls do—•
But—give her time—•
She’s only two.
* * * *
Billie ,the Bustee, says: The best
way to get off probation is to cut a
few classes.
* * * *
First Boy: My dad is a banker and
he gets a salary of $1,000,000.
Second Boy: That’s nothing, my fa-
ther is a railroad man and his salary
is $2,000,000.
Preacher’s Boy: Huh! that’s nothing
—it takes ten men to collect my dad’s
salary and then they don’t get it all.
* * * *
Father says he can’t understand the
young men of today. About 12 o’clock
at night they are hanging put on the
gate saying, “Just one.”
* * * *
Mr. Arnold: Do you love your ene-
mies, Mr. Porter?
Porter: Yes, sir, if they are bigger
than I am.
* * * *
First Freshie: I just busted three
mid-term exams and it doesn’t worry
me a bit. Don’t you think I have a
wonderful piece of mind?
Junior (who is an A student) : May-
be so, but it isn’t a very large piece.
* * * *
Grace: Football is such a messy
gamer how do the men ever get clean?
Steve: They have a scrub team.
* * * *
Professor: You have a remarkably
powerful voice.
Wallis: Yes, do you think I shall be
able to fill the concert hall?
Professor: Not only fill it, but empty
it, my friend.
* * * *
“Women’s faults are many
Men have only two,
Everything they say
And everything they do.
*****
“Why is a woman’s mind cleaner
than a man’s?”
“I don’t know, why?”
“Because she changes her mind oft-
ier.”
* * * *
Most boys would be angels; if only
they could stop flirting between smokes
and stop smoking between flirtations.
* * * *
What did your boy learn at college?
Says he can’t tell.
Why not.
Says it’s a secret.
Nonsense!
No; you know, he learned the foot-
ball signals.
* * * *
First Stude: This paper says that
college girls don’t approve of “petting.”
Second Stude (with a relieved expres-
sion) : Ah! That explains it.
First Cake Eater: Explains what?
Second Cowboy: Nothing—only I
thought it was my line that was giving
out.—Mark.
* * * *
Fire Away
"B-A-N-Gl” went the rifles at the
maneuvers.
“Ooooooooooo!” screamed the pretty
girl, a nice, decorous, surprised little
scream. She stepped backwards into
the arms of a young man.
“Oh,” she said, blushing. “I was
frightened by the rifles. I beg your
pardon.”
“Not at all,” replied the young man.
“Let’s go over and watch the artillery.”
—Mink.
* * * * ■ ' f!
Cornered
“Mamma, why has papa no hair?”
“Because he thinks so much, dear.”
“But why have you so much?”
“Because—go away and do your les-
sons, you naughty boy.”—Ex.
* * * * ?
Emergency Measure
In a university of the Middle West,
chemistry is not elective. Thus it hap-
pened that a young theologian found
himself enduring the fumes of a lab-
oratory. In the final exam appeared
this question:
“What would you administer in a
case of aqua regia poisoning?”
The young man racked his brain and
regretted that he had neglected his1
chemistry. In desperation he wrote:
v“I would administer the sacrament.”
—Holland’s.
* * * *
Mottoes from Shakespeare
For the bootblack: “Ah, there’s the
rub!”—Hamlet.
For the convict: “I have done the
state some service.”—Othello.
For the landlord: “See what a rent.”
—Julius Caesar.
For the barber: “Make each particu-
lar hair stand on end.”—Hamlet.
For the baseball plaer: “Do not saw
the air too much.”—Hamlet.
For the prohibitionist: “I would fain
die for a dry death.”—Tempest.
For the cook: “Such stuff as dreams
are made of.”—Tempest.
For the hairdresser t “Frame to wom-
an false.”—Ophelia.
For the washerwoman: “Out, damned
spot, out, I say!”—Macbeth.—Terrell
School News.
TOPICS TO BE DISCUSSED BY
THE SCHOOLMASTERS’ CLUB
(Continued from Page One)
to be found in the courses given in the
preparation of teachers?
Creating school spirit and community
interest in the school.
Real relation between the teachers of
the school and the parent-teachers’ or-
ganizations. (Question interpreted to
include similar organizations.)
To what extent do town and city dis-
tricts discount experience in rural
schools as compared with experience in
city systems. (One means of discour-
aging the beginner teacher from going
into the rural schools.)
Correspondence courses to be given
by the teachers’ colleges.
High school clubs similar to the or-
ganized sororities and fraternities, but
still not organized.
Affiliation vs. student interest and
needs.
What the teachers can do to make
the coming survey effective.
Questions involved in raising the tax
levies.
What do superintendents think of
industrial education?
Keeping the boy in the rural schools.
Is a degree teacher teaching a 6-year-
old worth as much money as a degree
teacher teaching high school students?
The good to be derived from the In-
ter-Scholastic League compared with
undesirable features.
How much should the superintendent
have to do in the promotion of students,
regardless of the teacher’s judgment?
The attitude taken by some regarding
the employment of home girls as teach-
ers.
Present status of educational tests
and measurements.
THE ORGAN GRINDER
Poor and forelone, with no one to care,
With furrow lined face and streaked
gray hair;
Old and neglected, worn by pain,
Why must he stand in the blinding
rain?
Are there no comrades, no friends, no
home
That he must o’er the wide world roam,
No children to greet him, no helpmate
to share
The burdens and sorrows each soul
must bear?
No, there is no one to care for him
now,
When Time’s hard hand has been laid
on his brow;
So, far away from the land of his birth,
Far from the scenes of his boyhood
mirth,
The organ grinder stands there in the
street,
While the raindrops fall on the grass
at his feet.
He strikes a chord, his mind flees away
Back to sunny Italy on a bright spring
day.
He plays for the youth that has long
ago fled,
For the passions and hopes that now
lie dead.
As he stands there and plays, with wa-
vering hand,
And thinks of home and native land,
A schoolgirl leans from the window
above,
To list to the notes of peace and love,
And she sees him standing, bent - and
old,
Out in the blinding rain and cold.
She drops a coin to the street below
As he closes the song so soft and low,
And watching him with misty eyes.
She waits to see if her act he’ll surmise.
The music stops, he looks at the ground
For the coin has fallen with a clinkling
sound;
But the ground gives no glint of silver
or gold,
Where the coin might lie in the earth’s
dark mould.
He looks again with sinking heart,
How could it from the spot depart?
To him it is bread and drink and life,
A moment of rest from work and strife.
’Tis only a pittance, scarce enough for
bread;
rYet to him it means both food and bed,
Thus he eagerly searches as the min-
utes pass,
For the coin that is hidden in the
dewy grass.
At last the silver sheen he has spied,
As if the tiny coin had cried,
“I’m here, ’neath the soft grass so
green, fi|g
I’m here, tho’ I have not been seen.”
Plucking the coin from its hiding place,
And turning away with a quickening
pace,
Back to the city so dark and gray,
He slowly betakes his weary way.
But he suddenly stops, with a won-
dering thought,
What is the message the coin has
brought?
Was gratitude dead in a heart so cold,
Had he been thinking only of the gold?
So he asks himself, and turning again
He sees that face ’ganist the window
pane,
And now he plays, from a heart of love,
A song that arouses the echoes above.
He plays it again, and o’er his heart,
There steals a peace not soon to depart,
Then softly he turns, with peaceful
breast,
And hastens away to a place of rest.
But he leaves in the street where he
played the last chord,
A. lingering peace, like a prayer to
the Lord;
For gratitude’s gifts are dearest and
best;
’Tis they which bring greatest peace
and rest.
A College Student, July 28, 1922.
PRES, A. W. BIRDWELL
VISITS COLLEGE
(Continued from Page One)
Miss Louise Dickey will visit Miss
Clara Mansfiel din Austin this week-
end.
A. M. Gomez
HANDY SHOE SHOP
Shoes fixed while you
wait. All kinds of shoe
work done.
NEXT TO ROGERS
pression, ‘I am broke.’ Of all the pro-
fessions in the world the teacher has
the least right to whine about being
broke. If you came into the profes-
sion seeking an education in order that
you might not have to work as hard
as some other person whom you knew,
and believing that an education would
make a downy bed for you, it is time
that you were finding out that you can
never achieve any marked degree of
success without work. Of all the great
pieces of work, of all the great achieve-
ments, of all the outstanding accom-
plishments that history tells us anything
about, there is not one back of which
there is not or was not real honest hu-
man toil and work. Work is the finest,
one of the greatest words of the Eng-
lish language.”
In speaking of the individual’s ability
to live himself, President Birdwell
pointed to the cultural subjects as be-
ing the chief source of living in and
for oneself. To live for and with, in
harmony with, and in co-operation with
one’s fellow man, the speaker pointed
to the more practical phases of educa-
tion.
Education is helpful when absorbed
and applied in the right way. Unless
an education helps us over a long pe-
riod of experimentation, unless it al-
lows us to profit by the experiences of
the generations of men that have gone
before us, our education is not of the
right sort. The primary purpose of
an education is to shorten this period
of experimentation in order that more
of the life of the individual may be
spent in the pursuit of real achievement
and accomplishment, and less in experi-
mnt and invntion.
Throughout President Birdwell’s ad-
dress there was evident the finest kind
of attention, a hushed stillness, over the
large assemblage, which was only an-
other indication of the high esteem in
which Mr. Birdwell is held by the stu-
dents and teachers of the Southwest
Texas State Teachers College. No speak
er has quite received the courteous at-
tention during the last year that Mr.
Birdwell held at general assembly Fri-
day morning.
Preceding and following the address
yells were given for “Birdwell,”
“Prexy,” “Nolle,” “Woodson,” San
Marcos ana rgacot
thusiastic students of the college.
-o-r--——
Misses Mayme Kruze and Lucile Ro-
per are at home for a few days.
Dr. S. D. McGaughy
DENTIST
Over Williams Drug Store
Eat
Wholesome Bread
Cooper’s Bakery
BONDS
Restaurant
DO NOT!
Be misguided by our ad-
vertising. Come and
see our work.
BOGGDS SHOE SHOP
Phone 133. 2S. Fire Sta.
BUICK SERVICE CARS
PHONE 86
Anywhere- -anytime. Baggage transferred. Special
rates on trips to San Antonio, Austin, etc.
JOHNNIE H. DOBBINS, Prop.
Call at
E. C. HORTON’S
MODERN ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP
Personal Service and Guaranteed Workmanship
FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE
PHONE 7
WOOD BROTHERS
“A Better Store For Men”
CLEANING AND PRESSING CALLED FOR AND
DELIVERED
Telephone Number 42
North Side Square
Next to Brevard’s
I «#«»»♦ *•**•••<*♦<«*«“•**
DRINK AT JENNINGS
Specials for this Week
Apricot Ice, Banana Nut Cream, Date Nut Cream,
Melons on Ice.
JENNINGS’ PHARMACY
We Deliver
Phone 32
A. B. Rogers Furniture Co.
STUDENTS!—Keep in
touch with the latest
Victor releases by visit-
ing our perfect present-
ation booth. We cater
to students’ wants in
furniture, rugs, picture
framing and novelties.
NORTH SIDE CORNER OF THE SQUARE
The
NESBITT
Barber Shop
Huy Your Bathing Suits From
1.0. Harrison
The Q«e Price Store

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The Normal Star (San Marcos, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 37, Ed. 1 Saturday, July 14, 1923, newspaper, July 14, 1923; San Marcos, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth614572/m1/4/ocr/: accessed May 26, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas State University.

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