[Twelfth Armored Division, Scrapbook 3] Page: 1 of 258

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FRANCE
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RODERICK R ALLEN
MAJOR GENERAL U. 3. A.
COM MANDl NO
OPERATIONS of tlie 12™ ARMORED DIVISION
5 DECEMBER 1944 to 5 MAY 1945
DISTRIBUTED BY
G'3 IN FORMATION AND EDUCATION SECTION
3cale 1 : 1,500,000 or 23.67 miles to the inch
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’•••* *. • ,‘Berchfesgaden
Kufstein •
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Enemy Contact Points Assembly Points
Army Boundries National Bdrys ...............
SWITZERLAND
4kfay 45
AQJSTE^JIA
Prepared by
Sat. Donald Rothenbcra
? .0-3 Section
Stft. ieorqe Qrimshuw
0* 2 Section
February 19, 1945
By A.I. Goldberg 1 vJ**s
Weyersheim, Alsace, Jan 24-(Belayed)-AP-This key front line village
six miles west of the Rhine still is in American hands today because
12 yanks with two tanks stood their ground when the Germans threw
attack after attack at the town last Friaay, Saturday and Sunday,
The Battle of Weyersheim may not rank with the greatest in the
war, but the stand made by the little group of yanks held an Important
sector of the Alsatian front and it is Stands like this that add up to
Victory.
After the Battle at least 26 German tanks lay in the ridges of No
Man's Land northeast of Weyersheim, while others hobbled off the field
damaged. Eleven of these tanks and three other armored vehicles were
accounted for by the 12-man team.
There will be medals for these boys later, but today they enjoyed
something still more precious---A Rest Behind The Lines.
The leader of the team was Lt. Wayne Guitteau of 562 North Monroe
St., Butler, Pa. From a vantage point in the field he directed by
radio the operations of the two tanks which picked off the enemy.
Commander of one of the tanks was Sgt. Edward Vlekless, 3209 Spang
ler St., Brentwood, Pa. In his crew were Col. Robert Grover. Briver,
of 27 West Gates St., Columbus, Ohio; Sgt. Albert Osuch, Assistant
Driver, of Schodack Landing, N.Y.; Ct-1. Frank Conway, Gunner, of
- Bentown, Ind.; and PFC. William Flemming, Loader, Route 4, Xenia, Ohio
Strasbourg Area
iGreenlown Man
Pari of Heroic
PARIS — (AP) — Three «uc-
eeeeive German attacks from
the center of the cross-Rhine
corridor have smashed the
Seventh army defense line
back almost five miles Into the
village of Weyer-Shelm, 8/z
miles above Strasbourg,__
American Team
^American troops”"fought these
Troops at Gambsheim and Offen-
dorf, while, some .enemy units |
pushed in, a westerly direction■
| toward Hofirdt and Weyersheim,;
■j French villages four to six miles
I from the Rhine , ■
'DJE3S MOINES JD3UNE
TBTCJBS., JAN. 25, 1945.
Iowan a Hero
The other tank wascommanded by Sgt. Kenneth Detrick, 117 Wright St.
inirton. Ohio: With a crew consisting of Col. Robert Mitas. Driver,
Covington, Ohio; With a crew consisting of
Montezuma, Iowa; Pvt. Ralph Miller, Assistant Driver, Wikel, W. Va.;
Cpl. James Welch, Gunner, Sacramento, Calif., and Pvt. Victor Costar
Loader, Indian Orchard, Mass. During part of the engagement Costa
was spelled by ?vt. Ralph Sipe, 329 North Sixth St., Hamilton, Ohio.
In addition to the 11 Tanks which they knocked out, the two
crews destroyed at least one self-propelled gun and two anti-tank guns*
The high point of their stand came Friaay morning when they re-
pelled a concentrated attack. The two tanks managed to get into
position in a samil woods and with Guitteau calling their shdS from an
observation post, picked off seven tanks and three other vehicles.
On Sunday Detrick*s tank smashed into a German pocket of resist-
ance, killed a number of the enemy and drove 102 more into the hands
of patrols.
Lt. Col. Charles Symroski, Braadock, Pa., said all the men had
been recommended fordecorations.
WEYERSHEIM, ALSACE,
Wednesday (Delayed) (JP) — This
key front line village six miles
west of the Rhine still is in
American hands today because 12
Yanks—one an Iowan—with two
tanks stood their ground when
the Germans threw attack after
attack at the town last Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
After the battle at least 26
German tanks lay in the ridges
of no man’s land northeast of
Weyersheim, Alsace, Jan. 24—(De-
layed) — UP) —This key front line
i village six miles west of the Rhine
i still is In American han(ls today
'because 12 Yanks with two tanks
stood their ground as the Germans
threw attack after attack at the
town last Friday, Saturday and I
Sunday.
At least 26 German tanks lay In;
the ridges of no man’s land north- i
east of Weyersheim, while others
• hobbled off the field damaged.
Eleven of these tanks and three;
other armored vehicles were ac- •
counted for by the 12-man American
team.
There will be medals for these i
boys later, but today they enjoyed
something still more precious—a
rest* behind the lines.
The leader of .the team was Lieut j
Wayne Guitteau of Butler, Pa. j
From a vantage point in the field,;
he directed by radio the operations'
| of the two tanks which picked off
i the enemy.
j In one of the tanks was Corp.
I Frank M. Conway, gunner, of Green-
i town, Ind.
Cut Colmar
Pocket In
r j Parts
Strasbourg Breathes Easier
In the half light of early dawn, beard-
ed troops of die French Fourth Moi
DE3 MOINES TRIBUNE TPE3„ JAN. », 1945.
-- -—p--------™ Moroccan
J Division and tankers of the American
Twelfth Armored Division suddenly came
upon each other on Feb. 5 in the village
of F " ’ " ' ~ ’ j -
U. S. First Army
Batters At Second
West Wall Line
r-pJ Rouffach, south of Colmar in Upper
Alsace. The meeting signalized the break-
1 ing up of German resistance in the Col-
mar pocket and the end of the threat to
Strasbourg. |
Fighting,in water-logged valleys and
craggy —M—j—
of the Southern Vosges
BY JAME8 M. LONG
PARIS—(AP) — American tanks
and French Morrocan mountain
troops cut the Colmar pocket in
two today, trapping elements of.
perhaps three German divisions in
the Vosges mountains south of
Strasbourg.
American tanks of Maj. Gen.
Frank W. Milburn’s 21st corps I
crashed down from south of Colmar
while • the Morocoans advanced |
from north of Mulhouse in a com- j
bined gain of eight miles. The pock-
et, reduced to less than 200 square I
miles by midnight, was virtually
erased and the threat to Stras-
bourg from the south was erased.
Mountains, the Germans had been hold-
ing this pocket against the Sixth Army
Group since last fall. They were trouble-
some and a potential danger that became
very real on Jan. 6 and 7, when they
thrust up toward Strasbourg while other
Gentian divisions were driving down in
•their curious prestige offensive (News-
week, Jan. 15). They gave the Allies
some I bad moments.
jThen, determined to clean them out
/once and for all, the Sixth Army Group
/threw two French and One American
corps against the Germans in a campaign
Weyersheim, while others hob-
bled off the field damaged.
Eleven of these tanks and
three other armored vehicles
were accounted for by the 12-
man American team.
There will he medals for these
boys later, but today they enjoyed
I something still more precious—
|a rest behind the lines.
In one tank was Corp. RHbfigt
Mitaa, driver, Montezuma, la.
Corporal Conway, husband of
Mrs. Manonna Conway and son of
Mr. and Mrs. Trelle Conway of
Greentown, was Inducted into the
service and left Kokomo January
12, • 1943. He received gunnery
schooling and tank training at Fort
Knox and Camp Campbell, Ky.,
and at Camp Barkeley, Tex.
NAZI ARMY MAULED.
WITH 6TH ARMY GROUP UP)
—The effectiveness of the Ger-
man 19th Army has been de-j
stroyed and approximately 75 per
As many as 10,000 Germans were I
perhaps doomed by the severance
of the Colmar pocket Maj. Gen.;
Roderick Allen’s 12th Hellcat ar-
mored division linked up with the
Fourth Moroccan mountain division
of the Trench First corps this morn-1
ing at Rouffach, midway between I
Colmar and Cernay. The Hellcats
are the third division fighting in
the 2lst corps, presently under
French First army command.
( ich began Jan. 20. The Nazis battled
A valiantly as ever, but they slowly
l rumbled under the onslaught. Last week
bth the Allies and the Germans officially
>-ecIared that the Colmar pocket had
been crushed. The Sixth Army Group
claimed the destruction of six enemy di-
visions and one panzer brigade.
Buckers-Up
W On New Year’s Eve the Germans
punched a “little offensive” .against the
Tith Army Group on the AJsace-Lor-
.<?ne front in France. Viewing this drive
in relation to the more pressing prob-
lem of the Ardennes salient, American
military strategists are reported to have
nted t< Sf ■ .....
o^ its personnel has been I
J&sQ. or captured, Lieut. Gen.
Jacob L. Devers told correspond-
ents Saturday in reviewing the|
campaign that eliminated the en-
emy’s Colmar pocket, i
Jaarbrucken
More than 15,000 of the Ger-
j man 19th are prisoners, and the
ContribU-Tzp by
SHikLEY ANt> HRRfJ 3. WAHL
C/A3R.> ||B1 B
figure soon may reach 20,000,
he stated.
i “We fooled the Germans with
j the strength of our dispositions in
j Alsace," the 6th Army Group com-
. mander explained. He praised the
work of French and American of-
ficers who conducted the cam-
paign and lauded the co-operation
between French and American
units of his command. \
The American 7th army moved
within two miles of. devastated
Saarbrucken (pop. 135,000) and
fought house to house through the
nearby French rail and industrial
center of Forbaoh (pop. 11,500).
Historic Spicheren on the border
was taken.
The 7th army has captured
1,800 Germans in six days, head-
quarters said. In Forbach, the
defense was mainly by old men of
the volkssturm. Villages nearby
were bombed and strafed.
Wanted to fall back on the Vosges-Moun-
tains and let the Germans have Stras-
bourg and part of Alsace temporarily.
Such a withdrawal would have released
, several divisions for use in the north.
But Gen. Charles de Gaulle and his
chief of staff balked because of the de-
| moralizing effect such a move would have
I had on France. As a result, the Sixth
I Army Group stuck in Alsace and fought
' les sales boches to a halt. By last week
the danger to Strasbourg and Alsace
seemed to have subsided, for the time
being at least. And French morale was
high.

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United States. Army. 12th Armored Division. [Twelfth Armored Division, Scrapbook 3], book, Date Unknown; (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth639086/m1/1/ocr/: accessed September 18, 2020), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting The 12th Armored Division Memorial Museum.

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