The Daily Herald (Weatherford, Tex.), Vol. 20, No. 218, Ed. 1 Monday, October 13, 1919 Page: 1 of 6

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WEATHERFORD, TEXAS, MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1919
PRE8S
♦ THE STRIKE SITUATION. ♦
Youngstown, Ohio, Oct. 13.—Con-
siderable turbulence is reported
throughout the valley today as mills
resumed operation in greater volume.
Crowds of strikers around each plant
stoned the strike breakers and many
arrests were made. One man is dead
and two seriously injured.
i We show the most extensive assortments of in-
|lants First Step Shoes. In all black, black with
tops; and in all white at $1.40, $1.50, $1.75.
KhUiDREN’S EVERY-DAY AND SUNDAY
fflpHOES—tn all black, or black with white tops; in
Bp! or patent leather; in button ‘style only. Thus
there are no stfings to be’ dangling or coming un-
tied These are priced at $1.50, $2 50 up to $4.00.
CHILDRENS KNITTED TOQUES and CAPS
Ipj&tt ideal article for the cold, damp weather, very
^attractive in make up and full of warmth. Mod-
erately priced at 50c, 60c, 75c and $1.00.
j. p. burrus of mckinney gives
out interview concern.
ING SITUATION.
McKinney, Texas, Oct. 13.—J. Perry
Burrus of this city, prominent Texas
miller and authority on wheat pro-
duction, has given the following inter-
view on the future of the grain market
insofar as it relates to the farmer:
“There seems to be considerable un-
certainty among the farmers as to
whether they should sow a normal or
a small crop of wheat within the next
thirty days. That the acreage is go-
ing to be greatly reduced is certain,
for the reason that there has been so
much moisture and vegetation. The
land has not been broken, and, as a
consequence, conditions now point to
a short crop of wheat for 1919-20.
“Another thing that is retarding the
sowing of wheat is the fact that the
guaranteed price will be taken off on
the first day of June, 1920, and the
farmers will then depend upon the
price as determined by the supply and
demand of the world’s market. The
crop now being threshed promised in
the early part of the season, and the
government forecasted 1,250,000,000
bushels, but to excessive rainfall and
other factors, this crop has now been
cut down to approximately 900,000,000
bushels. This wheat, generally speak-
ing, is of inferior quality, and it re-
Washington, Oct. 13.—The striking
railroad shopmen at Altoona, Pa., have
administration
notified the railroad
that they would return to work today.
The strike was local and unauauthor-
ized.
New York, Oct. 13.—The strike of
11,000 teamsters, chauffeurs and help-
ers tied up the principal railroad ter-
minal of Greater
New York
today.
The strikers demand $25 raise, eight
hour day and a week’s vacation every
year. The chief organization affected
is the American Railway Express Co.,
with 8,000 employes here.
•trvicc and Satisfaction for the
Past Thirty Tsars.
Washington, Oct. 13.—Some official
action either by President or his cabi-
net, to avert the threatened strike of
soft coat miners November 1 is ex-
pected. It was said at the White
House that officials regard the matter
as one requiring governmental action
if other efforts to avert the tie-up by
the coal miners fails.
ONEL E. M. HOUSE
RETURNS FROM EUROPE
GUARD PLACED OVER ALL
AR8ENAL GATES AT BREST
By associated Press.
Brest, prance, Oct. 13.—The situa-
tion created here by the strike of ar-
senal employes, which increased in
gravity yesterday and took a decided
revolutionary turn, remained serious
today. A strong force of troops, how-
ever, is guarding all arsenal gates, en-
abling workmen to enter the plant in
lar, it bars. Business is almost at
a con t standstill, all stores being
clos' id the streets deserted except
by at. ikers.
a Ay Associated I'-ess.
Pfew f.Xofck. Oct. 13.—Col. Edward
Ejaiduae arrived Sunday on the trans-
1*4 Northern Pdtilc suffering from
t slight attack of grippe. Colonel
louse spent nearly a year in Paris,
jopre he has been representing Pres-
dent Wilson in the suprelne council
ftSbe the latter's return home. With
lolpnel House were his wife, Com-
Upppr William McLean, his person-
al physician, and several other mem-
>era*<jf the colonel’s party.
Some are collared with rich furs and some with
self-materials—some strictly tailored, while others
are shown in the smart Godet flare, but whatever
style or kind of suit that you may prefer you will
doubtless find it here in these immense displays of
newer and better suits—
These finer suits from $65 to $157.50.
Other suits of splendid value ranging in price
from $32.50 to $62.50.
Canton, Ohio, Otc. 14.—The striking
iron and steel workers began to re-
turn to work by the hundreds here to-
day. Obout 2,000 in all went to work,
company officials said.
quires considerably more pounds per
Recent
barrel of flour than usual,
government statistics disclose that the
consumption of flour In the past
twelve months and since the war end-
ed is 15 per cent greater than the pre-
vious year.”
“While the price of wheat in Texas
today is not in excess of the govern-
ment guaranteed price, yet in many
states the price is in excess of the
government price, and it is believed
by a great many well-posted men that
we will see three-dollar wheat before
another crop is raised. Inasmuch as
5,000 DELEGATES AT DISCIPLES
OF CHRIST CONVENTION
COL. HOUSE SUFFERING
FROM GALLSTONE ATTACK
NO VOTE TAKEN ON CHINESE-
JAP QUESTION IN SENATE
by Associated Pres*.
Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 13.—Five
t ousand delegates are expected to at-
tend the international convention of
thq Disciples of Christ in this city,
There will
nj Associated Pres*
, Washington, Oct 13.—The vote on
the resolution requesting certain in-
formation regarding Chinese-Japanese
relations was postponed indefinitely
today on objection of Senator Wil-
October 13-20, inclusive,
be five or six conventions merged into
one large gathering.
This season shows a very strong preference for
the separate coat.
The new fabrics are all here and are shown in
the leading fall shades—
$18.50, $22.50, $27.50, $35 to $65.
New coats for children and girls in the very
Missionary and
benevolent organizations of the church
each will have their special day or
days when the attention of the entire
convention will be focused on that
particular work.
The Christian Women’s Board of
Missions, of which Mrs. Anna R. At-
wr.ter of Indianapolis, is president
will occupy the early sessions of the
convention. That organization main-
tains mountain schools and colleges,
emigrant social service establishments
and missions in Mexico and the Phil-
ippines. Edgar DeWitt Jones of
Bloomington, 111., is president of the
1920 convention.
liams, Democrat, of Mississippi, who
said that in his present state of health
the President should not be request-
information on sucb
panied by a severe cold,
to be feeling better today.
ed to furnish
matters.
DELEGATES FROM THIRTY
NATIONS AT CONFERENCE
styles that the children like so much—all sizes from *
6-months-old infant to the big miss of 15 19.
By Associated rreaa.
New Orleans, Oct. 13.—Delegates
from thirty nations were today at the
opening of the world’s cotton confer-
eiitee. Governor Pleasant of Louisiana
and Mayor Behomann welcomed the
delegates. James R. McCall, chair-
Don’t Fail to See Our Hats
Here’s the biggest Millinery stock ever shown
in Weatherford, embracing as it does all the very
newest modes in smart headwear, we dare say you
will experience po difficulty in selecting a hat.
Hats for elderly ladies, for middle-aged ladies,
for young ladies, for misses and children of all sizea
and ages—See our hats.
FRANCE TAKES OVER POLICE
AFFAIRS FROM THE ARMY
COMMON LAW WILL BE IN.
YOKED AGAINST PROFITEER
AIRMEN READY TO RE8UME
LA8T HALF OF JOURNEY
CAREFUL
EXAMINATION
By Associated Praia
Paris, Oct. 13.—Decrees published in
the official journal today place the in-
terior affairs of France on a peace
basis, thus ending the state of siege
and long censorship, and transferring
jurisdiction over police affairs from
the army to the prefectures.
Louisville, Ky„ Oct. 13.—Common
law Is to be invoked In Kentucky
against profiteers and price gougers,
according, to instructions being pre-
pared by Attorney General Morris’
office for distribtuion to every circuit
udge and commonwealth’s attorney
in the state. Grand jury investigation
of mgny profiteering cases apparently
will result. ,, . .
Common law covering profiteering
holds that a dealer has a specific ser-
vice In getting various products to the
consumer and is entitled to a reason-
able compensation for service alone,
without regard to profit. The instruc-
tions of the attorney general’s office
recite that many city charters give
power to fix prices and that persons
monopolizing foodstuffs are open to
indictment regardless of intent.
Three offenses are recognized by
common law In connection with food
profiteering—first, forestalling the
market by buying goods before a mar-
ket is reached or preventing goods
from reaching a market, second, re-
grading products by buying and sell-
ing on the same market merely to add
to the price of the consumer, and third
depleting the market by hoarding.
By Associated Press.
Mineola, New York, Oct. 18.—Re-
freshed by the enforced Sunday rest,
forty flyers In the transcontinental
derby lined up at the controls today
prepared to take the trail completed
Lieutenant
and clog* scrutiny of the minute de-
§r tails make our Garage a safe place for
|js you to deal.
ftring your car to us with the full
assurance that it will be properly at-
tended to. j
Our business has beftn a success,
many thanks to 6ur many friends and
customers.
Store Opens
Store Closes
Maynard,
Saturday
Major Spatz and Lieutenant Kiel, the
three leaders.
SUIT OF STATE OF RECOVER
LAND IS CALLED TODAY
By Associated Press.
Austin, Texas, Oct. 13.—A suit by
which the State of Texas is seeking
to recover 72,000 acres excess and va-
cant land from the Capitol Freehold
Land & Investment Comapny, came up
in the Fifty-third district court here
today.
8HIPMENT OF AMERIMAN
-r MILK REACHES BERLIN
Berlin, Oct. 13.—-The first delivery
of American condensed milk has
reached Berlin and will be distributed,
according to directions from the don-
ors, to systematic milk cures for un-
derfed school children.
General Auto Supply
House & Garage
J. C. CRABB, Prop,
aiids Phone* North Main 8tre*t
GERMANY RESUMES TRADE
WITH MEXICO AND CUBA
By Associated i-nsa.
Berlin, Oct. 13— Freight traffic be-
tween Hamburg and Cuba and Mexico
was resumed Saturday with the clear-
ance of a steamer carrying a mixed
cargo for these points.
Have your residence or business houses
piped and be ready for the natural
gas in the next few we
President’s Condition Unchanged.
By Associated Press. ,
Washington, Oct. 10.—President
Wilson’s condition remains unchanged
and his organs are functionig normal-
ly, said the bulletin issued today by
his physicians.
We areJpelighted to announce to our friends
that we are at last ready for business at the best
and mosi, modern service station in this section of
Texas. Our Btock is complete in every particular
and we are ready to give you QUICK SERVICE
in . any department.
COME ANJ) SEE US QUICK.
GIRL KILLED AND TWENTY
OTHER8 HURT IN WRECK.
Wagoner, Okla., Oct. 13.—Mattie
Bryan, 14 years old, of Row, Okla.,
was killed out right and twenty per-
sons seriously injured when a north-
bound Iron Mountain passenger train
Struck a broken -rail one mile out of
Kbe littlj^fttion of Neodesha, five
miles northwest of Wagoner. Tbe In-
jured were brought back to Wagoner
ml a special train and received treat-
ment at a local’hospital.
THE HEARLD FOR JQB PRINTING
Call 454 an41
work ve
MARK PUTMAN
//// siORt wmt uii conns
-

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The Daily Herald (Weatherford, Tex.), Vol. 20, No. 218, Ed. 1 Monday, October 13, 1919, newspaper, October 13, 1919; Weatherford, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth645235/m1/1/ocr/: accessed May 25, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; .

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