Limestone to Legacy: The Austin Scottish Rite Temple

One of 19,414 texts in the series: Hill Country Heritage Region available on this site.

Description

Application materials submitted to the Texas Historical Commission requesting a historic marker for the Scottish Rite Temple, in Austin, Texas. The materials include the inscription text of the marker, narrative, miscellaneous documents, maps, and photographs.

Physical Description

37, 21 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Creation Information

Kelso, Gordon W. 1999~.

Context

This text is part of the collection entitled: Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Files and was provided by the Texas Historical Commission to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 283 times, with 5 in the last month. More information about this text can be viewed below.

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Texas Historical Commission

The Texas Historical Commission is the state agency for historic preservation. THC staff consults with citizens and organizations to preserve Texas' architectural, archeological, and cultural landmarks.

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Description

Application materials submitted to the Texas Historical Commission requesting a historic marker for the Scottish Rite Temple, in Austin, Texas. The materials include the inscription text of the marker, narrative, miscellaneous documents, maps, and photographs.

Physical Description

37, 21 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

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Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Files

These files document historically significant buildings from five Texas heritage regions. Landmark status is awarded to structures deemed worthy of preservation and is the highest honor of its kind in Texas.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Files

These files document historically significant buildings from five Texas heritage regions. Landmark status is awarded to structures deemed worthy of preservation and is the highest honor of its kind in Texas.

Related Items

[Historic Marker Application: Scottish Rite Temple] (Text)

[Historic Marker Application: Scottish Rite Temple]

Application materials submitted to the Texas Historical Commission requesting a historic marker for the Scottish Rite Temple, in Austin, Texas. The materials include the inscription text of the marker, narrative, miscellaneous documents, maps, and photographs.

Relationship to this item: (Is Part Of)

[Historic Marker Application: Scottish Rite Temple], ark:/67531/metapth491755/

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Creation Date

  • 1999~

Added to The Portal to Texas History

  • Dec. 1, 2015, 9:26 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • July 3, 2020, 6:09 p.m.

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Past 30 days: 5
Total Uses: 283

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  • 30.280051, -97.740668

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Kelso, Gordon W. Limestone to Legacy: The Austin Scottish Rite Temple, text, 1999~; (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth654724/: accessed October 22, 2021), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Texas Historical Commission.

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