The Daily News-Telegram (Sulphur Springs, Tex.), Vol. 26, No. 149, Ed. 1 Sunday, June 22, 1924 Page: 3 of 8

Illll—IN III
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THE DAILY NEWS-TELEGRAM
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LEARNED MEN
BECOME WILD
IS REPORT
London, June 21.—Oxygen star-
vation produces softie extraordinary
effects on men ascending high
mountains. Professor Burcreft at
the Royal Institution recently told
his hearers that during one of hie
ascents, after a height of 16,0(10
feet had been reached, he noticed
one of the party behaving wildly.
At another altitude a highly re-
spectable one indulged in lurid lan-
guage and there was the case on
record of a man suffering from
oxygen starvation who had written
down his sensations, and as the
starvation became acute started get-
ting his spelling fuddled.
It was charadetistic of this star-
vation that though the victim would
kuow what to do, as for instance
that by moving 20 yards he would
get out of danger, he would not do
so unless definitely instructed by
someone else.
Good Advice for Women
San Antonio, Texas—“While fak-
ing Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescription
for" feminine
weakness I was
also relieved of
stomach troeb-
je. The ‘Favor-
ite Prescription’
was exactly the
tonic I needed
in every respect
-1 got well short-
ly after I started
taking it. My
V ! belieT is that
/ * what it did for
me it win do for others. Therefore
1 advise all women who are in poor
health to take a course of this treat-
ment.”—Mrs. J. T. Stauffer, 1522 W.
Houston Street.
All dealers. Tablets or liquid.
Send Dr. Pierce, President Invalids'
Hotel, in Buffalo, N. Y., 10c for trial
package tablets.
-T
BDFFALO BILL’S
OLD FRIEND
SIGN NAMES
)StO
“Eccentric Rag”—Oriole Orchestra.
“Eileen”—Gene Rodermick’s Orchestra. No. 261G
“Spain”—Isham Jones Orchestra.
‘“In the Land of Shady Palm Trees”—Isham Jones
Orchestra. No. 2600.
. Murray & Wester
‘Always Something New on the Brunswick’
Health.
Hints
by tke
Father of
Physical
. Culture
BCRNAR.K.
MAC FA DO CM
ITE OF MURDERERS
\ NOW WITH JURY
r^xarkann, June 21.—The judge’s
|iai:ge and the argument consumed
whole forenoon yesterday in the
trial of J. Rush Wimberly Jr. of
readia. La., for murder In connec-
on with the killing of J. Mervin
awklns of Shreveport, La., on n
ansas City Southern passenger
Vain here January 7. The case
pRt to the jury at 2:40 yesterday
(ternoon.
^'either the charge nor the open-
argument of the state made any
ntion of the death penalty. Tha
fense in its argument placed
less upon the right of self-de-
hse, and emphasized tho- great
I’sicaj difference between the de-
Jiiant and the dead boy, the for-
being frail and the latter large
uthletic.
Testimony showed that Hawkins
ocked Wimberly down and that
tmbeNy had not regained his feet
jen he fired the shot that killed
Iwkins.
Character witnesses for the de-
indant included a Louisiana dis-
trict judge, district attorney, sta:e
senator, state representative, sher-
iff, mayor and two bank presidents.
Hawkins was killed in a special
coach in which u party of Louisians
cadets were returning to a military
college in Missouri after the Christ-
mas holidays. There had been a
quarrel over a pipe broken by a
brother of the boy who was killed.
After shooting Hawkins, Wimber-
ly placed his pistol in his suitcase
and sat down to await the arrival
of police officers. Hawkins died in
the railroad coach within a. few min-
utes after having been shot. Wim-
berly is 17 years old. Hawkins was
1C. Both belong to prominent Louis-
iana families.
Av|
1
CONFESSED SLAYER OF WOM-
AN ESCAPES
Little Rock, June 19.—Burl Cor-
dell, white youth who gained con-
siderable notoriety while serving n
term in the Tennessee prison on a
charge of auto theft by "confess-
ing” to the murder of a your.';
wonV,i here in 1922, escaped from
the state hospital for nervous dis-
eases last night together with El-
mer Kramer of Crittenden county.
They had not been apprehended
this afternoon. Cordell recently was
declared insane by a jury in circuit
court when his trial was called on
a charge pf auto theft. Although he
was held for some time on a charge
of murder investigation by 6tate
and county officials failed to estab-
lish any evidence to connect him
with the slaying of a young wom-
an whose body was found hidden in
a brush pile near here and he was
released without ever having been
tried on the charge.
A man or woman weak In tho
kidneys Is like a board with a knot
In It With any severe strain away
goes the whole fabric; It becomes
broken and useless.
Vitality of the kidneys must be
maintained. These very useful or-
gans must be watched with the
most Jealous care. It Is their work
to carry oft the greater part of the
waste fluids of the body. Much
solid waste.matter, too. In the form
of very small particles, is eliminat-
ed In the fluid ejected by the kid-
neys. ^
Now the kidneys may be given
proper hardiness combined with
muscular flexibility. Just as easily
as may the bleeps. Note that I
say proper hardiness. The kid-
neys are delicate organs that need
strengthening, •et bow many,
even among athletes In training,
over give a thought to the
strength of these organs? The
kidneys arc there, and they appear
to be doing their work properly.
Is that all the thought that need
be given them until they complain
through the medium of disease?
No! Moct emphatically no! Tho
kidneys need care no matter how
healthy they are, and by proper
care they can be strengthened. But
how?
First, In the way of gentlo exer-
cise by massage. Stand erect, with
tho hands resting Just back of the
hips and ovtr the kidneys. Mas-
sage strongly upward and down-
ward'. applying the heel of each
Land over one of tho kidneys.
Continue this for one or two full
minutes every time that you ex-
ercise.
Follow this up by kneading over
the kidneys for about the samo
length of time. Clench the hands
and aply the knuckles of tho fing-
ers over the region of tho kidneys.
Start with fists close to tho spine
and knead forward over tho or-
gans, stopping only when you
have reached tho sides of the
trunk Just under tho lowest ribs.
Then knead backward again, and
repeat this movement several
limes.
Then follow up tho kneading by
striking over the same surfaces
with the tips of the lingers, con-
tinuing this percussion, in the for-
ward movements, until you touch
the abdomen. Then go backward
and forward again.
ANDREW CARNEGIE SAID
"If business is worth any of your
time it is worth all of it.”
“Many people have passed up a
golden opportunity by putting thiir
minds to one thing and their money
to another.”
“The time to invest in your busi-
ness is when its future is before it,
not behind it. Here lies the secret
e: success.”
“Nowadays business is service."
“it requires an understanding ot
human ways and the acquisition of
studied knowledge.”
“It requires cultivation of publie
opinion by liberal, broad-minded
policies.”
“It requires the thinking of
thinkers, the doing of doers, and "he
•elimination of the gambling in-
stinct.”
“The average person puts 25 per
cent of his energy and ability into
his work.* The world takes off its
hat to those who put more than 50
per cent of their capacity, and
stands on its head for those few ant;
far between souls who devote 100
per cent.”
Cody, Wyo„ June 21.—A com-
pilation of incidents and anecdotes
l elating to the life of Colonel Wil-
liam F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody, for
whom this town was named, is to
be undertaken in connection with
the unveiling of a statute to the
famous Indian fighter on July 4
here. The work is to be d6ne un-
der the direction of Mayor R. C.
Trueblood.
The plaA include the collection
of signatures of Buffalo Bill’s
friends into n huge tome to be
known as “the register of Colonel
W. F. Cody’s friends.” Additional
volumes will contain incidents of
his life. The register of friends is
expected to contain the names of
I .-II high officials of the United
i fctates government, as well as thoss
| oi several ruling monarchs of
| Europe, with several of whom Col-
| one' Cody was intimately associat-
^ eii. Mayor Trueblood expresses the
j belief that ColonefcCody had more
friends than any man living in hip
time. The mayor has issued an ap-
peal to all acquaintances of the
famous frontiersman to send in
data for the memorial library.
The statute will show Colonel
Cody astride a rampant horse. It
will he reared near the entrance to
the city. The Cody archives are ex-
pected to furnish to posterity inti-
mate glimpses of life in the early
West.
//HEAT HARVEST
NEEDS LABORERS
RAINBOW GIRLS
Tho order of Rainbow for Girls
will meet in regular session Monday
evening at 7:30 o’alot k, in the Ma-
sonic hall. We will have the initia-
tion ceremony and every member Is
urged to be present.
ADDIE MAE GLOVER, M. A.
FLORA ANDERSON, Secretary
QUICKSAND SUCKS MAN UNDER
WHILE RESCUERS LABOR
Thirst Chaser!
Orange Ade
scorched throat hasn’t
chance against a cold
irink of Orange Ade. The
text time your throat is
lot and dry, try a glass
if Orange Ade to enjoy
the pleasant results.
k Olympia
Confectionery
Phone 163 ,
Wilkes Barre, Pa., June 19.—
While his wife and children looked
on helplessly rescuers tried in vain
Tuesday to save Anthony Antanar-
tiss as he sank alowly in quicksand
in the rear of his home at Sworers-
ville, three miles from here.
For two hours neighbors with
shovels kept pace with him as his
body was drawn into the sand. The
best they eould do was to keep Jtiis
head free. As fast as sand was
taken out he would sink lower.
Finally the quicksand covered bis
head, smothering him. A wooden
barricade was sunk around him and
he was removed. Physicians stood
ready with pulmotor but (hey eould
do nothing. ,
t...............
NOW'S THE TIME TO ADVERTISE
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DIAL. MELSON A BRIM
Attornsys-At-Law
First Natl. Bank Building
Tom Ramey Lloyd Dtvidson
RAMEY A DAVIDSON
LAWYERS
Pulley Building
Sulphur Springs, Texas
F. A. WHITE, M. D.
Ear, Eye, Note and Throat
Glanses Fitted Correctly
First Natl. Bank Building
Phone 88
——S———■— «l ill- —
r A SON
V.
D. II. sw
”'exas
AffLaced with
SCOTT TITLE COMPANY
Sulphur Springs, Texas
Or>E. Walters, Manager
Dallas, Texas, June 21.—The
wheat harvest in Texas, estimated
ft 12,000,000 bushels, will absorb
not only all the local surplus labor,
bi.-‘ will require approximately 5,-
000 hands from outside sections, ac-
cording to a bulletin received Fri-
day from the state department of
labor by C. E. Mick, secretary, who
has established temporary head-
quarters at 110 East Fifteenth
street.
Another branch office has been
established at 620 Polk street, Ama-
rillo.
These branches, Mick said, will
rssiat in recruiting harvest hands,
inform them as to requirements ot
workers and help the men reach the
Golds.
Wagei $3 to S3 50
Wages for harvest hands will
range from S3 to $3.50 per day,
board included, and with a higher
rate for stackers., There is also
some demand for experienced engi-
neers and tractor men.
Information gathered by the de-
partment. according to Joseph ft.
Myers, state commissioner of labor,
indicates there will be a heavy yield
<>f wheat not only in Texas, but also
in Oklahoma anil Kansas. The Tex-
as Panhandle shows a decrease in
acreage from lost year, but this, it
is believed, will be more than made
up by the heavy yield.
In Oklahoma it is estimated 6,000
men from outside the state will be
required. Pay there will be the
same as in Texag with stackers get-
ting $5 and $6 and engineers and
separators the same wages. The
inquirers of tractor men in search
of jobs exceeds the demand and the
secretary of labor of Oklahoma has
issued a warning to that class of la-
bor to be prepared to accept plain
harvest work, although there will be
some openings for tractor men.
Enid will be the principal dis-
tributing point in Oklahoma for the
harvest hands on account of its lo-
cation and railroad accessibility.
Branches will be established also at
Cherokee, Carmen, Avard, Alva and
Woodward.
Kansas being the largest wheat
growing state in the union, will re-
quire 35,000 to 40,000 outside men.
ROBBER GIVES BACK MONEY
OF EMPLOYE
Cincinnati, June 21.—“How
much of thi^i is yours?' ’asked the
bandit,' who held up and robbed
John Brown, filling station opera-
tor, of $35.
“Fifty tents,” replied Brown.
The bandit tossed Brown a half
dollar and fled.
WIFE TRAILS HUBBY AND UN-
COVERS RIVAL
San Antonio, June 21.—Trailing
her husband from New' Jersey to
Dallas, and later to San Antonio,
Mrs. Malitta Lee had James Jeffrey
arrested this morning on the charge
that he had another Wife here. Jef-
frey is being held on a vagrancy
charge pending investigation.
Mrs. Anne Reynolds Jeffrey
claims the man as her husband.
Both wife No. 1 and wife No. 2
faced each other at the police sta-
tion when Jeffrey was taken there
for questioning, but they displayed
no ill-will and chatted together for
a while.
FATHER LOSES WISH TO HANG
MURDERER
Florence, Ariz., June 21.—Wil-
liam Ward, c-pnvieted of the murder
of Ted Gross, University of Ari-
zona student, Dec. 26, was hanged
at o o’clock yesterday morning.
Plans for the murdered boy’s
father to spring the trap were not
carried out.idue to objection of of-
ficials.
Ward spent his last day reading
the Bible and writing letters, ap-
parently undisturbed by his impend-
ing death.
nose of McKinney man cut
OFF IN FALL
McKinney, Texas, June 21.—W.
F. Williams, 90 years of age, fell
yesterday at the home of hie son, 'J.
C. Williams, in the southern part cf
the city, and ^severed the end of his
nose. Because of his advanced age
It is feared the injury will prove se-
rious. Mr. Williams will celebrate
his ninetieth birthday next week,
should Re live. He was walking
about the home and was unable^to
explain the cause of hta fall.
NOWS THE TIME TO ADVERTISE
JAPANESE RACE TO REACH U.
S. AHEAD OF BAN
Tokio, Junes21.—Japanese rush-
ing to the United States “fo enter
before the exclusion law becomes
effective total 4,612, according to
figures sent here from Asaki from
which port the majority have sailed.
Of this number 782 are brides of
Japanese who either have formerly
lived in the United States or who
are there now'.
The emigrants are now aboard
ships in the Pacific, some bound tor
Seattle and the remainder for San
Francisco.
DODGING THE ISSUE
Mr. Flubdub was a trifle close.
However, he fell in love with a lady
and persuaded her to marry him.
She was said to be a very capable
manager. The honeymoon being
some time over, she approached her
husband one day with extended
hand. He seized it and attempted to
kiss it#
“Now, John, don’t try to dodge
the issue,” said the lady firmly, i
want flO.’’—Ex.
MERCURY CLIMBS TO US AT
CROWELL
Crowell, Texas, June 21.—A new
record was made when the thermo-
meter registered 112 in the shade
here. The heat combined accompa-
nied by hot winds, is producing a de-
vastating effect on the young food
stuff and cotton.
To Cure a Cold In One Day
•ton* the (
Cold, *
■mm*

7"
\
Auto Greasing
Our Specialty
Have that car of yours
greased and oiled here
by men who know their
business from every an-
gle—by man who make it
their life’s business and
know the game through
experience. Not only do
we give- efficient service,
but we do it promptly as
well. -•
City Service
Station
Phone 586
§ "I
-Y”
' . !
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j1
DANZIG WAR VETERANS DE-
MAND FREE LAND AND MEDI-
CAL AID.
Danzig, June 21.—The problem of
a soldier’s bonus is occupying the
senate of this ancient free city. The
16,000 veterans of the world war
living in Danzig declare that they
are unable to get along with the dole
that they are now receiving under e
German law of 1906.
Among the veterans’ demands are
preference in the allotment of land
for homesteads, free medical treat-
ment, a 300 percent increase of the
weekly allowance, and an extra al-
lowance to blind e-soldiers to defray
the expenses of their trained guide
dogs .
i'm
:f
. ... 1
NOW’S THE TIME TO ADVERTISE
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Sr
in
The Daily News-Telegram la a»
thorized to announce the following*
subject to the action of the
cratic Primary in July:
State Senator, 8th DUtrleti
CHAS. R. FLOYD.
CLIFTON E. BEASLEY.
For Congress, First DUtricti
B. B. STURGEON.
EUGENE BLACK
(Re-Election)
For Judge Eighth Judicinl DUtricti
GEORGE B. HALL
(Re-election)
Representative, Hopkins County:
ALEX BRICE.
R. E. ATTLESEY.
For District Attorney, 8th Jsffisl
District:
MARVIN P. McCOY.
C. O. JAMES.
H. O. NORWOOD.
Superintendent Public Instructions
H. C. BULLOCK.
F. E. (Fred) MATHEWS
J. Y. LAMM
II. S. HENSLEE
J. Q. WILER
B. F. VANDERSLICE
District Clerk:
AUBREY M. STEPHENS.
(Re-election)
County Judge:
R. E. BERTRAM.
(Re-election)
County Attorney:
EMMET THORNTON.
(Re-election)
County Clerk:
RUSSELL M. CHANEY.
( Re-election)
County Treasurer:
W. E. (Exer) JACKSON.
(Re-election)
Sheriff:
S. E. (Sam) SMITH.
(Re-election)
J. T. (Tom) CHAPMAN
For Tax Asaatsor:
GUS CONNOR.
(Re-election)
For Tax Collector:
H. GRADY SMITH.
(Re-election)
SILAS BULLOCK.
For Constable, Precinct No. It
D. H. (Donald) HARRISON.
For J net ice Peace, Precioct No. ti
T. D. DEATON.
J. t. THREATT.
Commissioner, Precinct No. It
W. E. (BUD) MELTON
WALTER BLALOCK.
For Conetnblo, Precinct No. Ii
EARL ADAMS.
For Conalhblo, Precinct No. Si
W. W. HINTON
For Public Weigher, Precinct Mm. U
JOE TOM WOOD.
(Re-election)
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Bagwell, J. S. The Daily News-Telegram (Sulphur Springs, Tex.), Vol. 26, No. 149, Ed. 1 Sunday, June 22, 1924, newspaper, June 22, 1924; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth826304/m1/3/ocr/: accessed December 13, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Hopkins County Genealogical Society.

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