Benavides Facts (Benavides, Tex.), Vol. 17, No. 27, Ed. 1 Friday, September 4, 1942 Page: 2 of 4

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BENAVIDES FACTS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1942
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THE BENAVIDES FACTS
Established in 1926 in Duval County
P. O. Drawer “CX” Benavides, Texas
Entered as second-class matter at the postoffice at Benavides
Texas under the Act of March 6, 1879.
J. L. C. BEAMAN, Sole Owner and Editor
P. 0. Drawer 120 Telephone 1171-W Alice, Texas
membei
TEXAsJSlji/ PRESS
ASSOCIATION!
tsJEXAS GULF COAST
Subscription Rate: $2.00 Per Year—Paid in Advance
Advertising Rates on Request
NOTICE—all classified advertising, obituaries, cards of thanks,
legal notices, poetry and readers are published in the EPCO Publica-
tions at the rate of two cents (2c) per word for first insertion and
me cent (1) per word for each subsequent insertion. A minimum
charge of one dollar ($1.00) will be made on any one of the above
items.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1942
THE COST OF LIVING
It does not take official reports
from Washington to show an in-
crease in the cost of living. De-
spite all the efforts put forth for
price control the stores and mar-
kets charge more. If this means
anything at all it is that the mys-
terious old villain we call “In-
flation” is gradually creeping up
on us.
How could it be otherwise with
-wars to finance, taxes to pay,
"higher wages—and “just a little
more,” here, there and every-
-where?
Whistle, and keep up your
-.courage boys and grils, it is go-
ring . to be worse.
SHORTAGES!
•Shortages of materials due to
■curtailed exports from countries
controlled by our enemies, sub-
marine warfare, and increased
demands for war production are
"being felt more and more in ev-
ery household as the months go
5bv and we get deeper into this
-world struggle.
The average American isiwill-
lo& to make great sacrifices, to
-;;-n this war if he can be certain
Thwt his sacrifices are necessary
-od that they are accomplishing
the promised results. What most
^Americanst do resent and deplore
Is fhe feeling of uncertainty about
the whole program and the doubt
.about the wisdom of some of the
^rational war planning.
'It has been said that facts are
the world’s scarcest raw material.
Right now we are feeling keen-
ly the shortage of facts. We are
told by one government official
one week that such a course is
necessary and the following week
■some other high authority con-
tradicts the former statement. We
are called upon to economize to
buy bonds and we see exorbitant
and unreasonable wages paid on
war contracts and outrageous
fees charged men by union of-
ficials for the right to work.
Another great shortage is in
common sense on the part of
theorists who announce imprac-
tical schemes from Washington
Which have to be revised and re-
revised at great cost to business.
Americans are tough and they
can take it. But they want facts
and they want more common
sense and courage in Washing-
ton.
homes and places of amusement,
thus not only hampering amateur
musical development but endan-
gering national morale as well.
With music so necessary to our
well-being, particularly in war-
time, and its well known advant-
ages in speeding war material
production,this move on the part
of the closed shop fraternity
should, at long last, demonstrate
to the American people the dan-
gers of the far-reaching powers
of a minority labor group.
WANTON SLAUGHTER
RACKET IN MUSIC
"Musical progress is being stop-
ped in America by a little man
m Chicago. He is taking us back
50 years, beyond the early days
of the radio, beyond the pre-
phonograph days when no mel-
ody lingered on beyond its echo.
Prepare yourself henceforth to
listen to the tunes of yesterday,
as long as your records hold up,
for the American Federation of
Musicians has decreed that no
new recordings and no new rec-
ords shall be made.
Yes, musical progress is being
stopped. Amateurs are barred
from the air by the closed shop.
Army and Navy bands cannot
play the national anthem at war
bond rallies because of the closed
shop. Recording shops and record
stores are folding up. No new
recorded tunes, from now on, will
be available for your home or for
your radio station because of the
closed shop.
Already a triple threat to our
war effort, the closed shop ex-
tends its long tentacles into our
For sheer planned brutality,
the Axis leaders have proven
themselves comparable to the
barbarians of ancient history. In
World War I there was much
talk of atrocities. But many of
the atrocity stories were made up
out of whole cloth for purposes
of propaganda. Real atrocities
were scattered and relatively
rare, and they were not done as
a matter of governmental policy.
In World War II, to the contrary
murder and rape and devastation
are pursued by the Germans and
the Japanese almost as a matter
of routine—and that fact has been
completely substantiated by repu-
table eyewitnesses. It makes lit-
tle difference to the Gestapo
whether a man is innocent or
guilty, as the mass executions of
hostages abundantly testifies.
The Axis radio, at times, actual-
ly boasts of the wanton slaughter
of non-combatants.
President Roosevelt, during the
course of a recent warning to
Axis officials that retribution
would come when the war ends,
said, “The practice of executing
scores of innocent hostages in re-
prisal for isolated attacks on
Germans in countries temporarily
under the Nazi heel, revolts a
world already inured to suffer-
ing and brutality . . . Civilized
people long ago adopted the basic
principle that no man should be
punished for the deed of an-
other.” That principle has been
America will manufacture more
food products this year than any
nation has ever produced in the
history of the world, according
to a report from grocery manu-
facturers.
THE MESSAGE OF THE FLAG
there
When I see the old Flag
Tossing high in the air,
The greatest old Flag
could be!
I have a queer feeling
It’s waving up there
To send down a message for
me.
“I’m the beautiful Flag
Of the brave and the free.
In all that you say or do,
Be worthy each day
Of a banner like me
And then I can be proud
YOU.”
—Selected.
From where I sit...
/>y Joe Marsh,
When I drop into Sam Abernethy’s
store, I usually come away with
something worth rememberin’.
Sam’s our town’s most successful
storekeeper and he’s not one to do
much talking, unless he figures he’s
really got something to say.
Last evenin’ he said plenty.
* * *
Stranger was in the store. And
Ben Ryder, Homer Bentley and
some others were talkin’ about the
scrap collection when this feller
sort of horned in ...
“I hear these scrap collections
are a lot a bunk,” he says. “Fact
of the matter is, this junk they’re
gathering ain’t no use for makin’
steel. Just a waste of time gettin’
it together . . .”
At that point Sam steps in.
/ “Jest a minute,” he says, fixing
him with a cold and steely eye.
“May I inquire where you got them
so-called facts?”
The stranger hems and haws,
and Sam advances on him grim
and unsmilin’.
“Name your authority, sir,” he
says. And he wasn’t kiddin’I “Tell
us, where did you get all this in-
side, private information?”
Well, sir, I never saw Sam so
mad since Lem Martin’s dog
chased the cat into the pickle bar-
rel. And I guess I never saw a man
crawfish out of a place fast as that
fellow did.
* * *
Thinking it over afterwards, I
came to the conclusion that Sam’s
got the real system for handling
folks who throw facts and figures
around free and easy like.
F’rinstance, I’ve noticed there’s
some pretty fancy fact and figure
jugglin’ done by some of those who
oppose the right enjoyed by mil-
lions of decent people to drink a
friendly glass of beer when they
want to.
Lately I’ve been asking these
folks the same kind of questions
that Sam asked that rumor-
mongerin’ stranger. Try it yourself,
next time you hear anybody mak-
ing derogatory remarks—whether
it’s against the war effort... or
just against beer.
entirely abandoned by the Axis.
The Axis is deliberately ex-
terminating entire population, j :
Hitler himself has said that the tsi
Poles must be liquidated—and,
according to reports which have
seeped out of Warsaw, the death
rate has assumed incredible pro-
portions, especially in the Jewish
areas. Starvation is rampant in
Greece, and some authorities be-
lieve that within two years, un-
der present conditions, the Greek
people will virtually disappear.
Men who have escaped from Jap
concentration camps in Hong-
kong and elsewhere, say that the
Japanese are pursuing an almost
identical policy. Captured soldiers
and civilians alike are given al-
most no food. They are denied
all medical supplies and atten-
tion. Sanitary conditions are li-
terally horrible. And these peo-
ple, as a result, are dying like
flies.
One of the latest Axis innova-
tions has been to raze entire vil-
lages, shoot every male resident,
and send the women and chil-
dren to forced labor within Ger-
many. For every attack made on
Axis officials, major or minor,
dozens of innocents are executed.
When a really important Axis
official is killed, such as “Hang-
man” Heydrick of1 the Gestapo,
the toll of slaughter runs far
into the hundreds.
When the war ends, as the
President has said, the men re-
sponsible for this will be brought
to justice.
-•_-;-
VICTORY IS OUR BUSINESS
Almost all discussions of our
part in the war and the adminis-
tration’s leadership of the nation
include a strong reference to the
fact that the American people
always want to be told all that
can be told them without helping
the enemy. The public is ready to
swallow the bitterest pills, but it
wants the facts. The appointment
of Elmer Davis to his present
position was designed to end the
confusion in w»r information, but
was also looked upon by many
as a recognition of the need for
getting more war facts to the
American people.
It is recognized that people not
only want to know what they
are fighting for, but also that
they need to know how their fight
is progressing. Above all, the
the democracies believe that the
public must have the truth.
VEGETABLE SALAD IN
PEARL BEER JELLY
2 tablespoons gelatin
. 1 cup Pearl beer
2% cups seasoned stock or
canned bouillon
1 teaspoon sugar
2-3 cup left-over cooked
vegetables and meat
1 tablespoon minced onion or
2 tablespoons pearl onions
Soak gelatin in Vz cup Pearl
beer 5 min. Add heated stock
and dissolve gelatin mixture. Add
remaining Pearl beer and sugar.
Cool, and when mixture begins
to congeal arrange cooked vege-
tables (peas, string beans, car-
rots or beets, diced), onion and
Men Needed To
Help Texas Police
On Home Front
state’s productive and economic
strength, will report to Camp Ma-
bry Sept. 7 to begin a two-week
training school devoted entirely
to examination work. There is
insufficient time, Garrison said,
to give them the full seven-week
The State Police are looking
for qualified young men to help i State Police training course.
police the wartime home front.
With more than 100 of his of-
ficers on leave with the armed
forces, State Police Director
Homer Garrison has announced
the appointment of 40 Drivers
License Examiners and issued
a call for applicants to fill 70
vacancies in the Highway Patrol.
The License Examiners, who
play a vital part in keeping down
costly accidents that sap the
diced meat in the mold, rinsed
in cold water. Pour on the semi-
liquid mixture. Chill. Unmold on
lettuce and serve with a sharp
mayonnaise or French dressing.
Applications now are being
taken from prospective Highway
Patrolmen. A statewide examin-
ation will be held soon in each
of the 13 Highway Patrol District
headquarters. On Nov. 1 the 70
top ranking applicants will begin
their strenuous seven-week 'train-
ing course at Camp Mabry.
Peacetime requirements for
Patrol applicants are still in
force, Garrison noted, “because
a lot of this war is being fought
on the home front, and we’ve got
to have capable men.”
Applicants must be between 23
and 35 years old and not less
than five feet eight inches' in
height. They must weigh not lesji
than two nor more than three'
pounds per inch of height at the
time of appointment, have a high
school education or its equival-
ent, and be able to pass strict
physical, mental and moral
scrutiny.
REPAIR WORK
Have that watch repaired
NOW while parts are still
available. Priorities makes
new ones, and material hard-
er to get all the time. Our
prices are reasonable. All
work guaranteed.
W. A. SWOPE
“The Friendly Store”
ALICE, TEXAS
No. 44 of a Series
ifaLfii
__
Copyright, 1942, Brewing Industry Foundation

mm:
JUNK RALLY
For Benavides
and vicinity
NATIONAL SCRAP HARVEST
SATURDAY
SEPTEMBER 12
Benavides, Texas
Junk helps make guns,
tanks, ships for our
fighting men.......
Bring in anything made
of metal or rubber . . .
Get paid for it on the spot
Bring your family
Spend the day
Meet your friends
JUNK MAKES FIGHTING WEAPONS
One old disc will provide
scrapsteel needed for 210semi-
automatic light carbines.
One old plow will help
make one hundred 75-mm.
armor-piercing projectiles.
One useless old tire
provides as much
rubber as is used in
12 gas masks.
One old shovel will
help make
4 hand grenades.
® ^ ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^
^ ^ ^
MM
it /
Let’s Jolt them with Junk
from BENAVIDES
HEADQUARTERS FOR SCHOOL
SUPPLIES AT OUR DRUG STORE!
Get the best school supplies for your school-age
child so that he or she will not be handicapped
in school. A visit to our drug store will convince
you that De Leon’s Drug Store is Headquarters
for School Supplies. Our stock is complete and
our prices economical. x
DE LEON'S DRUG STORE
J. R. De Leon, Brop.
Benavides, Texas
LUMBER, PAINT AND
HARDWARE STOCKS COMPLETE . . .
Our stocks are complete to fill your needs for repairs
and replacements. If undecided about youi' plans why
not consult us?
VAELLO LUMBER COMPANY
LET US HELP YOU
GET THE MOST FROM YOUR CAR ...
Now is the time to give your automobile special attention
to prolong its life. Washing and proper greasing regu-
larly will enable you to get many care-free miles from
your car.
.
CANALES SERVICE STATION
FIRESTONE PRODUCTS
FOR YOUR HOME AND AUTO . . .
*
Our store is filled with every item to make your
home comfortable and enjoyable. From our
complete of Firestone products we can supply
your automobile needs, too. See us for an esti-
mate on all of your paint and varnish needs.
VAELLO SALES COMPANY, Inc.
Benavides, Freer and Hebbronville
r ]
NO MAGIC ABOUT IT!
ONLY A QUESTION OF FEEDING ..
For best results feed your cattle and stock a ration
that is made in South Texas for the special re-
quiiements of South Texas cattle. The proper
use of cottonseed products as feed will mean
more dollars from your cattle.
ALICE COTTON OIL COMPANY
D. C. Daniel, Manager
Alice, Texas
Iin

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Beaman, J. L. C. Benavides Facts (Benavides, Tex.), Vol. 17, No. 27, Ed. 1 Friday, September 4, 1942, newspaper, September 4, 1942; Alice, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth884567/m1/2/ocr/: accessed April 25, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Duval County Library.

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