The Optimist (Abilene, Tex.), Vol. 59, No. 1, Ed. 1, Friday, September 10, 1971 Page: 2 of 8

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TMK OFTIMWT
BirntMBKR 10 irri
1 gGmOaro aaftBo
by RAYMON FULLBRTON
HE'S DONE IT AGAIN Department: Burl McCoy that
well-known fashion plate and former track eoaoh at AbBeae
Christian College has chalked up yet another milestone for himself.
Burl resigned his field position with the American Party in
Birmingham Alabama and will soon be the Friends lead vocalist.
The Friends is a rock and roll group and Burl Is in his words
"optimistic" about his new job. Random Notes was unable to
confirm or refute McCoy's new position.
WHERE ARE THEY NOW? Pat Holder BS ACC '71; former
Wildcat football player and thlnclad as well as being a Who's Who?
Holder is a special floor representative to and for the public at the
Abilene store of Athletic Supply That means he sells athletic
supporters socks and other "condiments" for those athletically
inclined. Holder is not sure that he wants to make a career as a sock
Jockey. "This is real great work if you like standing around shuffling
trophies and gym shorts eight hours a day. If only Wally could see
me now" said Holder misty eyed.
Random Notes is proud to get the following scoop for Optimist
readers. This Is a list as provided us by Wolfgang Halbig of freshman
women he says are the most datable. And . . . Wolf ought to know
because when It comes to women Wolf is unparalled:
1. Linda Williamson
2. Beverly Ford
3. Betty Llndsey
4. Martha Mitchell
5. JanPruhliere
6. Donna Perkins '
7. Sue Jones ' ""
8. Judy Harris "
9. Linda Meyers
10. M'llnda Britton
Most of you big flying buffs missed the one airport opening that
the Big Country will have this calendar year. It was the initial
touchdown at the King International Airport and Tennis Ranch.
City Councilman Robert D. (call me Bob) Hunter spoke briefly with
special greetings from the city of Abilene. Ed George and the
World's Greatest Dance Band were there providing music as the
guests sipped Ice cold water and munched graham crackers.
Earl Bonlne director of special events for Route One Enterprises
thought anyone attending football games featuring ACC might like
to know the words of a yell. This is not Just any yell so read K.
Chocolata onoeolata te te te
Gatos gatos ACC
iVIVEN L06 GATOS!
Transfers hassle
Thru registration
by 8TIVK ORR
The pretty redhead looked up
In obvious confusion "Didn't
they explain that to you in
Orientation?" Then for what
seemed like the hundredth time
he had to onoe more explain
that he was not a freshman. He
was a junior! Blue eyes reflected
her mounting confusion.
Quickly he added the enlighten-
ing factor; he was a transfer.
"Oh I No wonder you dort't
know your way around." She
quickly pulled out the campus
map that she had received in her
orientation session and pro-
ceeded to identify the respective
buildings and checkpoint to be
used during registration.
Scenes similar to the one
above took place several times
Sunday ami Monday' of last
week. The mixed up transfer
above probably never got
completely straightened out
(Redheads affect some people
that way). What would have
helped him avoid the confusion
that he experleneed? How about
an orientation session for trans-
fers? Garvin V. Beauchamp viee-
president of student personnel
feels that such a program could
be used In effectively over-
coming the period of unfamiliar-
ity and confusion which every
transfer must go through. This
session though not as detailed as
that of the freshmen would
cover in depth such areas as
counseling and familiarisation
with the oampus. At this same
time oampus maps could be
issued directions for registration
could be explained and plans
for housing eould be finalised.
Vlee-president Beauehamp
will dleeuss tentative plans for a
spring transfer orientation pro-
gram with the effeeted personnel
before making a final deeision.
BBjpHM
New rules for women
by KARRIE HIMBS
In criticizing women's drsss
and house rules one would tend
to blame unfair rules on the fact
that one person composed the
rules. However faculty and
students compiled the rules this
year. This group effort should
provide a more equitable system.
The guideline for this group was
a desire for a relaxed atmosphere
whieh would promote educa-
tional and spiritual growth.
Safe sanitary modest and
attractive for all girls are the
general guidelines for the dress
code. Kveryone must wear shoes
and clean modest clothing. One
may wonder what Is "attractive
for all girls." This phrase refers
to fairness. It would not be fair
to allow a thin girl to tuok In her
blouse and not allow an over-
weight girl ' to do the same.
Therefore everyone wears a
tunic top over pants so every-
one Is dressed decently and In
order. (A note to girls who tuok
in their blouses: You might not
be as thin as you think.) WhHe
your mind is still confused about
fairness think about the dress
code for men.
This year the house rules have
been equalised. Although fresh-
men girls must sign out evenings
the curfew ts the same for all.
No longer must you tall the
cm
sgg"7 w&r v
ACC Station Box 8203
Abilene Texe 79601
PubKehed weekly except during
vacation SRd final hsmMw
exembtatioM by student Journal-
ist t AoHen CMstlM CoHstc-
Subscript ton fstee: $3 s ysrer$2
a seneeter. Second dee postage
paid st Abilene Texas. The
Optimist is a member of Texas
aroNfiet Pies Aollton
and Associated Cottegiata Frets.
Mark Cunningham Bdhor
Karen Hughes Msneamf RdHr
Jud Thurman .... BuaiaeM Manager
Jack Hodcst Sports goiter
BUI Bouilend Festers Boher
Petty Crow . . . .ColumnM
Raymon FeHarion Cotemalet
OrsyStsMsH AirM
B.E. Dsvtt Faculty Adviser
Writers: Linda Jo Brown Osry
Dickinson Karri Hssvm Asm Mister
Steve Orr Howard Reynold Twyle
Thome De Trsvta
v K
dorm mother that you went to
devo or elub In order to stay out
later. Quiet hour ts a necessity
for those napping or studying.
Remember that as you climb up
the stairs and hear sounds of
shhh from the walls.
Warnings are given for infrac-
tions of the rules. (Warning
sound nicer than demerits but
they are equal in effect.) Accu-
mulate more than 15 late
minutes and you qualify to
receive warnings. Ten warnings
ptaees you before the Judicial
Board which is made up of
students who decide your
punishment. Dean Toney will
handle the extreme eases whieh
will be few in number.
It Is difficult to determine the
equity of an established system.
The spirit In whieh the rules
were to be established was
maintained but let us question
the spirit. There is mueh concern
for our reputation in town and
this Is said to hinge on our
appearance. It seems that our
sister colleges have lifted their
trite rules and maintained the
eommunlties level of esteem.
Being a Christian school logic
demanaW that we eould abolish
mothering rules without
dropping our status.
A csIvisr duetts to tt thseghtf si iiHsrlsajMrk ftgerss
teday d tesawrtd thrsuth td eewtsty res TMSdsts Hsstsj Csatesey.
JERRY R0SENBER8 Ph.D.
Piychetaglit and witter el Tfte & af Mr-
ocy. whkh li dtveitd Is on ottatfc fi
gerernmtnt and IndtHWM sswpwisfl awd
their rtirtol te bidh-Mwel freed. Th feilaw-
Ing li bated en ht eptafofl day lemneny
belore tht U.S. Senate Subwmmlllt hearlnai
on turretllence ond prlvety.
THE COMPUTERIZED SHERLOCK HOLMES
Ii PefeaHel Tfcftol ef Ml'(rarjr-fl-Ceernmnl SwvrtBWs
and tithanie Douitt to in SvrWref af VrVary eed rVttdam
There is growing evidence that the Action I big brother society
ss envisioned by George Orwell In 1M4 msy In 1971 be mere ef
a reality then we would like to scknowtedgc.
The present attack upon the Fsderel Burseu of Inveewgetien
ami its dirsctor J. Edgar Hoover is sn outgrowth of trie feer of
some Congressman ths! their telephones neve been tspped; met
vetarnenouc computerised files sre knot on many Americans whose
action should not come under the justice Department's Jurledlc
(ton. and mat the Bureau hss become increasingly obseists by
Its fsttors to uphold Individual rights.
In addition testimony at a rscent Senate hearing revested
a new creek in the government surveillencc wsH. It we stated
that the highest officials of the Johnson Administration had In-
itleted Army surveillance of legitimate civilian poUtteal activity
In 1M7 and 1M8. The request (or the Intelligence program was
made by the military with encouragement from White House
smiciois
A directive issued by the Army ss part Of its program to keep
ervmsns under surveiHencc. showed that senior officers leered
"a true insurgency should external subversive forces devetop
successful control"' of the racist snd sntiwer dissidents who were
active at that time. The plan was sn outgrowth of decisions by
Whits House personnel during snd attar ths riots that followed
the sssasslnation of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr
During the hactic days of civil disturbance from the summer
of 1967 Through the fall of 1949 tha Army fed the names of
about 18.000 Americans into Its computers snd dossiers In a
wide-ranging Intelligence operation known as Continental United
State Intelligence or Conus Intel. Even the mitttery started to
question the value of collecting this information to predict the
site ef future civil disturbances. With the rioting that followed
King's death in 100 cities it was decided that the exact location
of a major disruption could not be predicted.
The Pentagon according to testimony has dossiers on 26
mHNon Americans. In its data bank are files on 760.000 organi-
zations and incidents snd on an avtrsge day 12000 requests ars
processed. Certainly our democratic principles am in danger when
the military decides to act as a watchdog over etvtitsns. To com-
bine their defensive activities with pubtic commentary and protest
Is te suggest a new power that could push si! people into sub-
At present computers in snd out of government have an almost
limitless capability to store. Intermingle snd st the push of s
button process Information on persons orgsnitation and a
variety of their activities sti without the knowledge of those In-
volved. Stacks of punched cards and tapes maintain statistics
sbout us that we msy not know exist We might never escape in
time or distance the bureaucratic machinery keeping tab on us.
WHh sit the splendid wonders of the computer we Sod our-
selves asking: has man become submissive to the advanced ma-
chine of today? Csn each Individual profess to be more human
In hi sctlons than the complex system he has dsvstopad to sestet
In dairy endeavors!
People want to determine for themselves In every psrtKuier
situation of life lust how much of their complex beiiefs attitudes
and actions they choose to disclose. To the American this data
t mors than fust statistics It is the data ef Judgment a passible
last Judgment that can affect their schooling employment pocsi-
armies promotion or rote in the community. The cmtens ef mk
country have a right to a personal diary that is away anal free
from the organisation's outstretched hands. They plead me esse
that if aH their sctlons were documented Including their mistakes.
It would be difficult to doss a page ef one's life and start anew.
It would be a tyranny over mind snd destiny.
There is a growing antagonism against people desiring power
who wW through technical and mental coercion try to Intrude upon
our private lives Unfortunately we have learned that the man
who wishes to gsin control wul employ vsrlous techniques to In-
fluence snd force Individuals into submission.
There I Mtle doubt that as computerised systems sensed
throughout the nation and world surveillance by date processing
Is bound to Increase. If the trend continues It wi soon be possrbr
to hsve sll personal Information about sn Individual gathered on
a continuous basis snd held Indefinitely until requested. The
snowballing effect Is quite pronounced. When the decision is made
to purchase a computer more data are gathered. Although-mis
my provide for better service improved decisionmaking and
peHcy-programming It skw provides person I information about
persons never known before the advent of computers.
The computer cannot be blamed for loss of privacy. K r but
an Instrument created by man. Computers and other sdvsnssd
machine are not permitted to be In error but man is net a
machine and doss not have to be as efficient as the tools he
has crsated to serve him. If man loses his right to be wrong
will he react by withdrawing from soctetyr Will his cutieucHy to
experiment with Me fatter! If this happens man truly bssemss
nettling more than a machine.
The right to preserve privacy is a right worth fighting for.
Computerised snd manual date accumulating system offer greet
potential for increased efficiency yet they also represent the
gravest threat of Invasion of our Innermost thoughts and aerlens.
Some see this trend as leading to an OrwetNen nightmare wfth
Big Brother watching over us and reporting to the central record-
keeping authorities any behavior adiudged out-of-rine with stated
petty. i In the end who will guard the guardians who control our
Our society is indeed complex requiring the collection and
use of fttec. mechanised and manual to guide us in our decisions.
Oomouters may continue to prove themselves the worthy servant
of men. But me server must yield to his master and the neoes-
sery mougM mutt be given to developing essential ssfogusro.
jsuSoell snd technological innovation are needed to control
&. M ccumenting all-remembering systems and demonstrate
that machine technology and data accumulation whether by the
nsWtery government or the private sector naod not necessarily
beer the stamp of increased surveillance
;yii
k&'i

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The Optimist (Abilene, Tex.), Vol. 59, No. 1, Ed. 1, Friday, September 10, 1971, newspaper, September 10, 1971; Abilene, Texas. (https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth99545/m1/2/ocr/: accessed August 23, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Abilene Christian University Library.

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