A. F. Weaver Collection - 912 Matching Results

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The Methodist-Episcopal Church

Description: The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built at 301 NE 1st Street in 1898. The larger structure shown here resulted from expansion of the original frame structure and the addition of brick to the exterior in 1903. This church was later torn down to make room for the larger First Methodist Church, which still [2007] occupies this site. This picture is a portion of a collage that shows several church buildings.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Roundtree Sanitarium

Description: "The Roundtree Sanitarium, located at the corner of SE Fifth Avenue and SE Third Street, was later owned by Dr. Hugh Milling and operated as the Milling Sanitarium. Part of this house is still standing." (Text taken from page 129 of A. F. Weaver's :"TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...") The eclectic architecture (The main building Prairie, the porches Neoclassical) is very interesting.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky

Description: Two boys,wearing flat paper caps,are shown here holding a sign that proclaims that Mineral Wells is "100% for 'Ike' Sablosky." The occasion is presumably a sports event--as suggested by the background. Details concerning Sablosky may be found in other pictures in this collection--under his name.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Howard-&-White Dry-Goods Department

Description: This picture shows a float for the Elmhurst Park Fair--around 1910. From the left are: Mr. Collier; A.L. Howard; Newt Wilson; Fred White (the owner); Pet Dotson; three Howard sisters: Helen, Floe & Eppie; Lizzie Lyles; Charlie Enzy; Joe Fleming, sitting); Mr. Phillips; Mae Howard; Mr. DeBusk; Lummie Glen; Bailey Enzy; Blake Turner; Leslie DeBusk. This picture adorns page 124 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Presbyterian Church: First Building]

Description: The first Presbyterian Church building at NW 4th Avenue and Second Street is shown here, with a gentleman in early 20th-century clothes standing in front of it. The great fire of 1908 destroyed it. The building was replaced (at the same site) with another, stone church, which was itself demolished and replaced by a third structure that remains to this day [2011] at the same address. Pictures of both buildings occur in A.F. Weaver's book on page 143. Detailed pictures of the second building may be found in this collection.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Hubbard Street: About 1925

Description: A picture of Hubbard Street, looking northwards to Oak Street is illustrated here. In the distance, the Crazy Hotel is being built. The photograph dates after 1925. It appears on page 135 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Inside a Howard Department Store

Description: This picture shows the interior of an A.L. Howard business that was located where the Baker Hotel stands today [2012]. Howard himself is shown standing behind the umbrella case. Please observe the clerk in the background. He is wearing a jacket. The lady in the mid-foreground is equivalently dressed. Please observe also the apparent dimness of the interior. The photograph apparently dates from the first quarter of the twentieth century.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Oaks

Description: Once located at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, the Oaks met its doom in a fire that destroyed it--and the nearby Presbyterian church--in 1908. A different picture of the hotel appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 103. The picture appears to have been excerpted from an advertising bulletin. Copy found around the negative's picture does not appear to relate directly to the hotel, but further text (that was not conserved) may have mentioned this particular hotel. A colophon in the lower right-hand corner of the photograph identifies it as the work of "Evans Photo Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Star House]

Description: The Star House was built by Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Ramsey about 1900, and contained 34 rooms. Copy around the picture (unfortunately not visible here) lists the rates at $1.25 per day, or $7 to $8 per week. A.F. Weaver (in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...") locates this hotel at "315 Coke Street" [sic], but Polk's Directory for 1909, 1920 and 1927 list no such person as "J.J. Ramsey", or a "Star House" located at the address given by Weaver. The 1909 Polk's Directory lists a "Star House" at 209 Elm Street (NW 2nd Avenue), with the proprietor named as "R. L. Neal."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[First National Bank]

Description: Shown here is the Teller's wicket in the original First National Bank. It was located at the corner of Throckmorton and Mesquite streets (Later: SE. 1st Avenue and SE 1st Streets). The identities of the people pictured are as yet [2014] unknown. The picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 1146.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Fairfield Hotel

Description: The Fairfield Inn, at 814 North Oak Street, was built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin. The hotel was built into the side of East Mountain facing West, and it is said each floor had a ground level entrance. The date of construction of the hotel is not known, but Colonel Boykin built himself a home at 1301 SE 4th Avenue in 1904.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[An Early View of Mesquite Street]

Description: This picture shows the D.M. Howard Block, on the lower end of Mesquite Street [2011], the intersection of Hubbard and SE 1st streets), facing west. The principal D.M. Howard building (farthest to the left in the photograph) survived to house various furniture establishments until 1975, when it was demolished. The three subsidiary buildings had been removed earlier. A legend on the base of the original photograph reads: "LOWER END OF MESQUITE STREET--Photo by McClure". Please note the absence of automobiles, the complete lack of paving, and the large traveling-bonnet worn by the lady in the foreground. The telegraph pole in the foreground appears to have been hand-hewn. The unpaved road supplies corroborating evidence that the photograph was taken before 1914. The identity of McClure, however, remains unknown. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 122.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 5 of 5]

Description: The Convention Hall met its end in 1979--after forty-five years of use. The exact location of this photograph in relation to the interior of the convention hall remains unknown. The picture shows two Roman arches, which must have been stress-relieving as well as serving as portals of access to various parts of the basement. The ends of two girders, which must have helped support the floor above them, are clearly visible above the nearer arch.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Crazy Hotel Brochure]

Description: This photograph illustrates a fold-out brochure of the Crazy Hotel with various scenic views of things to see and do around the city, along with different modes of transportation to and from Mineral Wells.
Date: 1930?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

City Meat Market

Description: The City Meat Market was located south of the Oxford Hotel. It faced SE 1st Street, where the entrance to the First National (Bank?) was located. Please observe the horse-drawn wagon at the right of the photograph. Modern [2016] viewers might be appalled at the sight of sides of meat hanging in the open air; but when this photograph was taken, it was standard procedure. The gentleman holding the carcasses of poultry probably does so only for the sake of the picture. The clean aprons of all the men associated with the store were probably also donned only for the picture. Otherwise, they would be heavily blood-stained. This building later housed Roger's Army Store. Information about it was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 121.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Crazy Well Water Company

Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. Recto describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Date: 1920?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library