A. F. Weaver Collection - 893 Matching Results

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[The Yeager Building]

Description: Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Yeager Building]

Description: A stone building named "Yeager Block" on the corner of NE 1st Avenue and NE 1st Street is shown here. (NE 1st is the street shown in the picture. Dr. Yeager lived two blocks east--up that street--of the drugstore). Once home of (what was known to some as)"The Lion Drugstore", it had a metal statue of a lion mounted on its roof. The statue of the lion was removed but not the exact date of its removal is not sure. It is not visible in a photo dated 1925 of the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. At the time of this photograph, (a handwritten note on the back of the photograph gives the date as 1993), it was housing the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route."
Date: 1993
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]

Description: Trees in full foliage (the photograph was taken in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was originally built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2009] owned by David Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators.
Date: July 1975
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library