A. F. Weaver Collection - 912 Matching Results

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[A View of Mineral Wells] 1886

Description: An oval inset of Mineral Wells as it appeared in 1886. The photograph on which it is overlaid was made in approximately 1925. Above, and right of the overlay, is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel complex, the current site of the Baker Hotel. An incomplete text under the picture compares Mineral Wells to other worldwide mineral water resort cities.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells]

Description: An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells is shown here. The picture is a composite of two views taken from East Mountain. Attached to the composite is a date "1901." The large building in the front middle of the picture is the Holloway & Haley livery stable. Some of the buildings are numbered on the photograph. Recognizable are: (2) The Hawthorn Well, with steeple (Right middle of the picture), (4) The original Crazy water drinking pavilion (two-story with smaller upper third floor, right middle of picture), The Lythia Well (between the Crazy Well and the Hawthorn Well), and The Hexagon House at the far right edge of picture.
Date: 1901/1902
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Elmhurst Park

Description: This illustration is numbered "30". It appears to be a picture postcard of the entrance to Elmhurst Park, an amusement park on Pollard Creek, about five miles southwest of Mineral Wells. The park operated from 1907 to 1913 by the Electric Company,, and was a major attraction in "The nation's most popular health spa" at that time. A lawsuit was entered by he City of Mineral Wells in 1912 against the Electric Company by reason of the Company's refusal to pave its right-of-way for trolleys in the city streets, and to pave its right-of-way to Elmhurst Park. The company tried to remove all trolley tracks in reprisal, but continued to supply electric lights to the park--and to City Hall--by way of compromise.
Date: 1907/1913
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Lamar Bath House, Lamar Annex]

Description: This picture is the Annex to the Lamar Bath House, and was located south of the first Methodist Church. The first bath house in Mineral Wells (at Dubellett's French Well) was located northeast of the Methodist Church, and was a neighbor to the Lamar property. The White Sulphur Well, operated by a Mr. Ligon, was located across the street--south of the Methodist Church--and sold in 1891. The Lamar Well and Bath House was developed at this time, and served water under the White Sulfur label. The Lamar property became part of the Baker Hotel property when the hotel was built and opened in 1929.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Basketball at Elmhurst Park]

Description: A note on the back of the photograph identifies this venue as Elmhurst Park. The park was located on Pollard Creek, some one-and-a-half miles from the southwest corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets; and was owned by The Mineral Wells Electric System, which operated a trolley that ran from downtown to the park. (The street car company went bankrupt in 1913, and both the park and trolley ceased operations that year.) The picture appears to be a tip-off to begin a period of play in a men's basketball game. Both men's and women's basketball games were held at the park when it was in operation (from 1907 to 1913).
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Crowd at a Race]

Description: A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track.
Date: 1910?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Panoramic View of Mineral Wells]

Description: The southern half of a two-part panoramic view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, taken about 1910 occupies this photograph. In this view, the Crazy Flats drinking pavilion is seen at the upper left;First Methodist Church near the skyline to the right of the Crazy Flats; and the First Presbyterian Church (domed building) at the upper far right of the picture. The houses shown are predominantly in the Queen Anne style--a popular one at the time of the photograph. This picture occurs on page 133 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", first edition, 1975.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Woodruff Cottage

Description: Copy around this picture states that the Woodruff Cottage was built by a Civil War veteran who came to Mineral Wells for his health in 1903. His health improved so much, writes the copy, that he decided to build a fine home here with rooms for visitors. A note on the back of the picture indicates the "Cottage" was opened in 1905. The copy also states that it was located one block north of the Crazy and Carlsbad wells, and became quite popular because of its convenient location.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Mercer House]

Description: A note on the back of the picture indicates that the Mercer House was built in 1905, and the accompanying description indicates that it was a boarding house operated by Mr. A. S. Mercer and family. The 1909 Polk Directory lists Mssrs. Mercer and Robinson as proprietors. It was located at 210 North Wichita Street [in 2008, NW 1st Avenue], convenient to the leading bath houses, wells, pavilions, and the Mineral Wells Post Office.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]

Description: The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Pal-Pinto-Crystal Wells Bath House

Description: The Pal-Pinto Crystal Wells Bath House is illustrated here, although its location is unknown. Thelma Doss wrote in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" that, "It was a long, rambling structure with a large number of rooms for bathing purposes for both ladies and gentleman. There was a grand selection of baths such as Plain, Turkish, Salt Glow, Russian Massage, and Vapor baths. This large rambling structure looked more like a house for a large family than a business." This picture occurs on page 65 of A. F. Weaver's book in both First and Second Editions.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Star House]

Description: The Star House was built about 1900, and owned by Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Ramsey. This 34-room hotel, situated at 315 Coke Street,(since re-named NW 2nd Street), was one of Mineral Wells' early hotels. The Star House was located 2 blocks east of the hotel on Mesquite Street (now NE 2nd Avenue), north of the current Baker Hotel. The Star House was destroyed by fire.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: December 5, 1973
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Wagley Bath House]

Description: The Wagley Mineral Baths, formerly known as the Bimini Bath House, was located at 114 NW 4th Street, the N.E. corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 4th Street. It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy and Croft. It was still standing in 1974, when A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" was first published. An early picture of the building appears on page 129 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells." It was demolished in the late 1980's or early 1990's.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Delaware Hotel

Description: The Delaware Hotel, at 316 North Oak Avenue, is shown here in its glory days. Formerly named "The St. Nicholas Hotel", the Delaware was destroyed by fire. The plat is shown in the 1900 map of Mineral Wells as the site of a sanitarium. This photograph has been restored. It appears in its original form (as the St. Nicholas) in the picture [St. Nicholas Hotel]. The current picture was "modified" with the name changes (to the Delaware) on signs and re-named at the bottom of the picture. This was probably the best picture of the structure at the time the hotel became the Delaware, . (Subsequent adjacent buildings and power lines interfered with the view). The Chautauqua is identifiable at the immediate left and behind the hotel. This version of the picture is on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Fairfield Inn, Mineral Wells, Tex

Description: Shown here is a an extensively damaged and repaired postcard of the Fairfield Inn. The inn, built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was located at 814 N. Oak Avenue and faced west. The postcard is addressed to A. J. Ryder, Mallory Docks, Galveston, Texas. The postmark it bears dates to 1911.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[An Early Oil Field]

Description: An early oil field, probably in Palo Pinto County, is shown here. The photograph, perhaps a composite of several smaller ones, as originally in the possession of M. A. Howell, who was once the county surveyor.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Photograph of Inspiration Point]

Description: Photograph of a scenic overlook on a mountain. Two notes on back of the picture read "So. of city on 281", and "Lake M W." This picture appears to be taken just east of Inspiration point, instead, and looking southwest, where the highway starts down the mountain.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Foster Hotel]

Description: A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. The 1907 Polk's directory lists it at (202 West Moore" (202 NW 6th Street ), two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. The proprietress is given as "Mrs. Sallie Cock." It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work sub-type, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the west side of the hotel's block. The Foster House (as it was called) was built just before 1902. Mrs. Sallie Cock was born in 1861 in Fayette, Texas. She married Robert H. Lett in 1886. She married Dr. Lewis Cock in 1898. She had three children by him. She died in Blanco, Texas in 1950.
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Visitors Arriving in Our City

Description: The boy shown near the center of the picture is 10-year-old George Calvin Hazelwood, who was a newsboy at the time. The man beside the boy is Louis Farris, who worked for the Hazelwood and C. W. Massie families of Palo Pinto. They are meeting the train to pick up the daily newspapers in 1920. The crowd is typical of the week-end visitors arriving from the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. The Weatherford, Mineral Wells & Northwestern Railway Company reported 190,210 passengers for the year 1920. (This information came from page 92 of Art Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells.")
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Cliff Home

Description: The Cliff Home, an early Mineral Wells hotel, stood on Northeast 2nd Street (formerly Coke Street) just east of the head of NE 1st Avenue (formerly Mesquite Street), and the site of the 1912 "Old Post Office" (now the Women's Club.) The hotel burned down in 1899, and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. That hotel, in time, became The Exchange Hotel, which lasted until 1900, at which time it was demolished, and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. It was touted as the only brick hotel in Mineral Wells in 1902. The Sanborn Map of 1907 gives the address as "207 E Coke", but the city Directory of 1909 lists the hotel as being at "211 E Coke." No building was listed in the City Directory in that block for the year 1920, save the Post Office. A street was added to the east of the Post Office between it and the Hotel Wilson(of which no further information at this time [2017] is available)/Mineral Wells Sanitarium (the building must have housed a hospital/clinic, as well), which was operated by a Doctor Buie. In 1924, the hotel was listed as being at 209 NE 2nd Street, and the sanitarium at 211 NE 2nd street. No listing for the sanitarium is given in the 1937 City Directory. The significance of the small "E" between "CLIFF" and "HOME" on the sign painted on the roof is not as yet [2017] known. The back of the photograph bears the name "Henry Sikes" (a banker in Graford, and probably the donor of the picture) written in ink, and a business stamp, "S.B. Hall, General Photographer." This picture is found on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells".
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Mineral Wells Yesterday And Today

Description: The caption to this picture indicates that there are two of them, taken from a common vantage point. This photograph dates from June, 1895, and it was taken from under the original Welcome sign. The view is to the southwest. The Methodist Church (the large white church with steeple) is in the foreground near the lower left corner. Above it, and slightly to its right (near the left edge and middle foreground), is an old two-story stone building which was occupied by the Bank of Mineral Wells. The second photograph, of Mineral Wells in a later time, is unfortunately not provided.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Where the "Doodle Bug" Crossed the "Dinky Car" Tracks]

Description: Illustrated here is the intersection of the "Doodle Bug" and "Dinky Car" tracks at the southwest corner of the Gibson Well property, NW 6th Street and NW 2nd Avenue. There were two "Doodle Bug" gasoline-powered motor coaches. The first one ran from Mineral Wells to Graford on the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMWNW) tracks. It was joined later by a second similar coach that ran from Mineral Wells to Seymour on the Gulf Texas and Western (GT&W) line. Two Dinky Cars, gasoline-powered motor cars on the Lakewood Scenic Railway, made round trips each quarter hour from the Mineral Wells depot to Lake Pinto. The Dinky cars, Esther and Suzie, were named after (banker and co-owner) Cicero Smith's daughters. The cars were joined in 1908 by a larger car--the Ben Hur. In the photograph the narrow-gauge dinky tracks running east-west along 6th Street crossing the wider standard-gauge railroad tracks running north-south (left to right in the picture.) The Gibson Well park and drinking pavilion are also shown in the picture.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library