A. F. Weaver Collection - 912 Matching Results

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[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]

Description: One side of a fold-out brochure produced by the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce, probably during the City's centennial year, 1981 is shown here. On the reverse side is a statement: "Mineral Wells, a Texas Main Street City, looks back over a century of history rich with the tales of early day ranching and the discovery of mineral water and its medicinal qualities." Color photographs of the city and its scenic area landmarks are contained in the brochure, along with a listing of some annual local activities.
Date: 1981~
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]

Description: A scene in the 400 block of North Oak, looking towards the south on Oak Avenue, taken in the 1930's is illustrated here. (Shadows indicate the picture was taken in the early morning.) The Budweiser Clydesdale team was introduced to the public in 1933, and is shown along the 200 block west. The "CRAZY" sign that spanned Hubbard Ave. (now [2016] US Highway 180) a block behind the Clydesdale team was erected in 1933 also, probably later in the same year the picture was taken. A two-story garage/office building, the former Seaman's Pontiac Agency (still standing in 2010) is visible alongside the Anheuser-Busch beer wagon. Other businesses noted are: Dr. M. S. Green, Chiropractor; King's Cafe. The prominent building behind the Clydesdale team is still standing at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue. Advertising signs noted: Texaco, Mobilgas, and a sign on the seaman's building for Crazy Water Crystals.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Buffet Table]

Description: A buffet table, presumably in the Baker Hotel, is shown ready for guests (who are absent) to use it. Its opulence would reflect the quality of the hotel. The fact that the photograph is in color suggests that it was taken in the late twentieth century. The exact location of this buffet table is [2014] unknown. An ice sculpture of a sleigh and reindeer suggests a Christmas occasion. Further details are lacking.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Baker Hotel Grounds' View]

Description: Here is a view of Baker Hotel from across its grounds. Note: There are umbrellas around swimming pool, but the swimming pool itself is out of view. Foliage includes Canna flowers and cedar trees. An unidentified woman and child are in foreground. The Baker Hotel had an ill-starred opening, as it occurred only weeks after the infamous stock market crash of 1929. The marketing of Crazy Crystals had been blamed for the distress, because fewer people needed to make the trek to Mineral Wells for the waters. They could produce the same thing in their own homes. However, no proof of that assertion has been found, and the general malaise of the Great Depression probably should be blamed. The owners of the Baker Hotel filed for bankruptcy In 1932. On April 30, 1963, Earl Baker formally closed the hotel. The property went under the hammer that August. The rest is history.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Baker Hotel Roof Garden]

Description: This photograph is identified as "Baker Hotel Roof Garden February 1999." Two chandeliers are still in place on the ceiling, but the missing floor boards, the peeling paint, and the deserted condition of the room are indicative of the sad condition of a once beautiful ballroom. A ballroom on the twelfth floor was titled "The Cloud Room" by virtue of the clouds painted on its ceiling. A picture of it has yet [2014] to be found.
Date: 1999
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]

Description: A copy of this picture is found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", Second Edition", on page 188. The caption states "Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 901 North Oak Avenue." Note the surrey with the fringe on top. The person in the buggy has been identified as Mrs. Flora Howard, daughter of William Winfield Hayworth "Howard", the minister of the church. Howard owned a hardware store, going under the name "W.W. Howard." He is also listed as a member of the I.O.O.F. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church takes its name from Cumberland Street, Pennsylvania, where the sub-denomination (more Arminian than the main denomination) was founded. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church is currently [2014] in Newberry, Texas. The building was sold to the Church of Christ, torn down and rebuilt. The North Oak Church of Christ still stands [in 2011] at this location, 901 N. Oak Ave. The picture is reliably dated to have been taken in 1912.
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

Description: The 1936 ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the new brick highway between Weatherford and Mineral Wells, now U.S. Highway 180, is depicted here. This photograph was taken just seconds before the photograph found on page 97 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS..." 2nd edition. Some of the dignitaries in the photograph are Allen Wallace, W.A. Ross, Pat Corrigan and Paul Woods. The new highway to Weatherford began at the 900 block of East Hubbard, and the bricks to fashion the highway were hand-laid by two strong Negro men.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

Description: This house, now [2009] located at 510 SW 4th Avenue at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and 5th Street, was a part of the original Mineral Wells College. The large structure was built in 1891 at 101 NW 5th Street. The front half of it was moved to its current location, and turned into a residence around 1902. The intersecting gables (and the hip roof) mark it as Queen Anne, but it may have undergone remodeling since it was built. Please note the two-story wraparound porch, which is rare in all parts of the nation, except for the south. This photograph may be found on page 170 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. [For more details about the College of Mineral Wells, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Building Being Demolished]

Description: This building, once the second Post Office, had stood at the corner of 201 SE 1st Avenue and Hubbard Street. This building (as the photograph shows) was subsequently demolished. A Piggly Wiggly grocery store was located on its site. As of March 2, 2009, the place was occupied by the Dollar General Store. This picture may be found in A.F. Weaver's "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 149
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

Description: The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!) east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California. Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons. Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

Description: This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where Southwest 25th Street and Southwest 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[402 SW 5th Street]

Description: A Victorian-era home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here, at 402 SW 5th Street. Please note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and intersecting gables (Which are characteristic of the style) and wraparound porch (Which is less so). The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, all of which suggest that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past.
Date: June 1974
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[416 NW 6th Street]

Description: Shown here is a photograph of the front and west side of a multi-story Queen Anne-style, cement-block house located at 416 NW 6th Street in Mineral Wells, Texas. It has many architectural features displaying the sub-type Patterned Masonry, such as the shaped parapets on the tower, and on the gables, as well as the Palladian window on the tower. The rectangular tower is unusual. Although it is not obvious in this photograph, there are more than the normal number of chimneys. The house is said to have a fireplace in each room--each one of which was unique. The fireplaces are said to have been faced with Italian marble. A picture in the "Daily Mineral Index" (that is thought to be contemporary with the house) shows another, frontal view, which also displays a conservatory, not visible in this photograph.
Date: June 1975
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Location Info:
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable and hipped roof, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141.
Date: unknown
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Baseball Team]

Description: This picture shows a men's baseball team in Mineral Wells, but the identification of both the team and the men are unknown. Ike Zablosky (sometimes spelled Zabronski), a Russian immigrant, arrived in America in 1906. He entered the fur-trading business in Mineral Wells, and is credited with naming the Possum Kingdom area when a customer inquired about some premium pelts. Zablosky replied that he had none at the time, but "When my boys return from the possum kingdom, I'm sure they will have some." Zablosky operated a class C professional league baseball team (the Resorters) in Mineral Wells. He became owner of the first professional baseball team in Dallas, later in life. The Chicago White Sox (J. C. McClure was their official photographer) are known to have held their Spring Training camp in Mineral Wells in 1911, and again during a three-year stretch of 1916, 1917, and 1918. It has not been established whether the players shown in this picture represent the Resorters or the White Sox teams. The man in the background, apparently in a World War I uniform, is shown holding an instrument (probably a bugle) whose function has not been determined.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Austin Well]

Description: This photograph shows the Austin Well as it was in 1974. A legend on the back of photograph reads: "Looking south shows remains of Austin Well in the foreground with the remains of what used to be the crystal plant. Across the street may be seen the St Regis box plant." The former Crazy Water Crystal plant, at the left edge of the picture, is now [2009] the St. Regis box factory This well is associated with a unique and romantic history: It was dug by a Mr. Austin, who claimed to have "Sore eyes", so that he had difficulty riding a horse. The horse, however, faithfully led him to a well where Mr. Austin soothed his eyes. He saw improvement after six weeks; and moved to Mineral Wells, where he drilled a well of his own. A cowboy rode a blind mare into Mineral Wells and auctioned her off for a dollar and a half. Mr. Austin acquired the horse, and put her to work drawing water from the well by turning a wheel to which was attached a rope, which with each revolution of the wheel, pulled a bucket of water from the well to ground level. Nellie was trained to pause at a point in her circular route long enough for the bucket to be emptied, then continue on to pull up the next bucket when it was filled. Blind Nellie was retired in her old age, but continued to walk a similar circular route in the pasture to which she was retired, pausing in each revolution, as before, until her death in 1912. Texas Packaging Company, Incorporated, has occupied the box plant since 1980.
Date: 1974
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The 100 Block of West Hubbard]

Description: This picture is an illustration of the south side of the 100 block of West Hubbard Street, looking southeast. The north side (and back view) of Cole's Florist and Hill's Style Shop can be seen at the center of the picture. Lynch Plaza, the darker brick building, is in the left middle background. Oak Avenue (U.S. Highway 281) extends north-south between Cole's House of Flowers and Lynch Plaza. Cole's occupies the site of the former Davidson Hardware, which burned along with the Damron Hotel in 1975. Lynch Plaza, the site of the mineral-water discovery well, was built on the site where the former Oxford Hotel burned in 1983. The parking lot seen in the right foreground of the picture was the site of the Damron Hotel.
Date: September 1988
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[612 N. W. 6th Street]

Description: This house is currently [2007] owned and occupied by Gil Hulls. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The style is tentatively thought to be neo-classic. The two-story porch is unusual. The house shows evidence of much remodeling. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Daily Index

Description: Shown here is the front page of the Mineral Wells "Index", featuring a picture of Judge Alvin Lynch, astride a mule and holding a large bottle of the Mineral Wells water. The picture is not sufficiently in focus to read a reliable date to the newspaper, except perhaps to discern that the issue comes from "Volume VIII".
Date: 1902?-05-(06)?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Crazy Water

Description: Shown here is a label for Crazy Water, characterizing is as a "Natural, Saline, Alkaline Mineral Water--a Mild Laxative and Diuretic." The label continues with directions concerning the proper dosage. A cautious note suggests that the prospective drinker consult with a physician in cases of doubt of the required amount of water to take.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library