The Civil War and its Aftermath: Diverse Perspectives - 2,965 Matching Results

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[Letter from Maud C. Fentress, Janurary 15, 1864]
Letter from M. C. (Maud) Fentress to her family regarding the loss of a package of letters that were being brought to her by Captain Hawood and her worries because she has not heard from her son David. Her area has not experience raids for several months, but she expects that to change. She writes about the taking of "Savanah" (Savannah, Georgia). She says that the former slaves continue to leave to join up with the Yankees. She sends an update on family and friends, where they are, what they are doing and their health.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David Fentress, August 4,1869]
Letter from Maud Fentress to David Fentress, detailing local activities in Bolivar, Tennessee including information about crops, local marriages, and the management of the John Fentress Estate. In addition she mentions various people's children and how they are growing up.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David Fentress, April 29, 1860]
Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David to her son describing the health of family members; the courtship of William and the widow Polk; her social life and the activities of her church; home repair and her need for a new well; Buster Belcher's denial in the sending an "impudent Valentine" and how rudely Kate has treated him. She requests information on his prospect for a good crop and "for making an easy living out there."
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, August 29, 1859]
Letter to David Fentress from his mother, Maud, discussing news from Bolivar, Tennessee which includes: Maud's health and the health of Anne and Sallie; home improvements made to Maud's house; a horse purchased by Maud; the health of the cattle and the hogs as well as the death of a cow from "black tongue" and the death of ten hogs from cholera; news of David's baby, it's growth and health, and it's appearance; news of the weather; a dialogue about Jimmie and Mary as well as details on their whereabouts; a discussion about how lucky Maud is to have "so good a daughter-in-law and two such nice daughters-in-law; a request for David to send the ten dollars in interest, though not by mail; a dialogue about sending David's letter to Neely; news about John Wood's marriage to Miss Guy; a discussion about Frank's eligibility for marriage; and a dialogue regarding Mary Tate, Jimmie, and "Old Pitner."
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, January 17, 1859]
Letter from Maud C.Fentress to her son David discussing the length of time between his letters; a dialogue about David receiving a visit from an "Uncle";Clara Fentress' recovery from illness; news of a birth; the business partnership between Doctor Neely and Coleman; the construction of a "Livary" stable and the improbability of David selling his lot; church news; the departure of Frank for La Grange; town gossip; a dialogue requesting David to write frequently; a discussion about Peters who returned with "his wife's big fortune," his purchase of slaves, and an estimation of his remaining fortune.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, August 4, 1859]
Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David Fentress discussing news from Bolivar, Tennessee and it includes: a marriage between Jimmie and Mary Tate which would take place on August 25, 1859, the couple's plans for their honeymoon, and their plans to board with Maude; a discussion of gifts made by Maude for her granddaughter (David's daughter); reports of the weather and its affect on the crops; a discussion about David's delayed visit; a discussion about the health of Eva Polk's infant; a brief recap of the most recent happenings in town.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, June 30, 1858]
Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing news for Bolivar, Tennessee and it includes: a financial agreement between Maud and David, a dialogue about buying a "place for herself" if her current place "falls" to Jimmie or Frank if they marry; a discussion concerning Mr. Wood who was closing Balam's estate; a discussion of religion; a dialogue detailing gifts given to Maud by Mrs. Neely; and an update on family and friends.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W.Fentress - June 1860]
Letter from Maud Fentress to her son David in which she commiserates with him on the heavy rains he has received in Texas. She plans to send David jelly and canned fruit. She states that other members of the family wish to move to Texas. She tells David that Frank wishes to make up with him and possibly move to Texas. She updates David on news about friends and family.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, February 27, 1864]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife stating that his brigade has been furloughed and requesting that she come to collect him in Bastrop. He has been sick since the party at Colonel Groce's and she needs to bring a wagon or ambulance to move him.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, February 22, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara regarding the order from Captain Weir stating that the men are to report to their captains in their respective counties. He writes of his plans to return home. He also gives an update on his health.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, May 26, 1864]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara to give her information on where to send her letters to him. He also gives news on the categories of soldiers that are being granted furloughs. There is a note on the back, dated May 30, that gives an update on his health and news of the war.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, June 19, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara that informs her that his Brigade is being sent back to Texas by detachments. He says that he will try to obtain a furlough once he reaches Houston, Texas, so that he can see her, the children, and pick up some books.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 16, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara was written while he was on the march in Louisiana. He describes the troops that are gathered and speculates on the purpose of their movements. He mentions that he has been invited to dine with Captain McDavid.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, December 21, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara telling her that he is sending food, candy, and cloth. He requests that she sew the cloth into drawers and send them back to him. He states his salary will be $110 per month. He then lists his expenses. He tells Clara he has had Yellow Fever. He requests cotton socks. He ends by regretting not being able to spend Christmas with his family.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, September 4, 1863]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara telling her that Mr. J. H. Hodges would be returning home to collect clothing for his company. He gives updates on the war; his health; and the health of his fellow soldiers.
[Letter from David Fentress to his Aunt, July 21, 1863]
Letter from David Fentress to his aunt in which he catches up on family news and comments on the daughter he has not yet met. He says that he sent a prescription to his wife to help heal her facial problem. He says he told William Berry of his son's death. Then he recounts speculation on Clara Berry's association with Dr. Van Dorn. He notes that a plantation house has been turned into a hospital and that one third of his men are sick.
[Letter from David Fentress,1863]
Partial letter from David Fentress to an unknown recipient. In the letter he describes his new location near bayous and lakes, and compares it to Brazos Bottom. He also discusses the living arrangements of him and his men, and mentions that he has lost one man in his time there. He ends the letter hoping to be home by Christmas.
[Letter to David Fentress, July 27, 1863]
Letter by an unidentified author to David Fentress regarding sharing federal newspapers and the banning of federal newspapers in some areas. The author passes on the news of the war including the destruction of the Federal merchantmen by the Confederate fleet. He passes along world news: Russia preparing to go to War with Europe and how that could negatively affect the Confederacy. There is also speculation on the future of the war.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, February 10, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara which starts out with a description of his health. He recounts the his encounters with the people living near his camp; the cost of housing; eating with Captain Weir; and the cost of common goods.
[Letter from from David Fentress to his wife Clara, c.1864]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara that is badly faded. Most of the letter cannot be read. It appears that in one place he says that he plans to stay at his post out of a sense of duty. It also appears that he sends his love to his wife and children.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, February 19, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara regarding his trip to Houston to acquire medicine for his troops. He gives details of his trip, how much he spent, and his plans to send his wife some money. He passes on news of the war. He says that the Monitor Fleet is a failure. He also speculates on the future of the war. He gives an update on his health.
[Letter from David Fentress to Clara, February 22, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara states that he handed Major Morgan money and candy for his family. Dr. Fentress gives her instructions on how to retrieve it and what debts to pay. He give an update on his health. He also has received an invitation from Colonel Groce for a "gathering."
[Letter from Maud Fentress to David Fentress, June 20th]
Letter from Maud Fentress to David Fentress, describing a man's poor health, items that she's sending to David's wife Clara, the weather, and the condition of his property.
[Letter from David Fentress to Clara Fentress, August 30, 1862]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife, Clara recounting the news of the war; his movements; his assessment of the territory he has crossed and whether it would be good farm land; his and his friends health; what is being eaten; and finally declaring his devoted love for his wife and family.
[Letter from David Fentress to Clara Fentress, July 17, 1862 ]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife, Clara, stating that he will be allowed ten days leave so that his uniform can be made at home; he gives information on the welfare of family and friends; and says he gets paid $20.00 monthly; he also gives news of the war including a victory over George McClellan, that Vicksburg still holds out, and the movement of Northern troops.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, November 12, 1862]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara detailing the process and difficulties of sending mail; the winter weather; illness in another company; his duties as a physician and schedule; how to care for sheep with scab; his personal health and a declaration of love for his wife and children.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, December 10, 1862]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara in which he asks her to write longer letters with news of her and the children; his hopes for an end to the war in the spring; the shortage of physicians and why that makes it impossible for him to receive a furlough; the difficulty in receiving newspapers that have been subscribed to; news of the war; Abraham Lincoln's success in bringing people in west Tennessee to support the north; the difficulty in sending items home because he does not think they would get there; the sick making their way to the general hospital and a list of individuals who have died; his dislike for the people of Arkansas; the support of the people of Texas for the troops; the cost of wheat; his personal health; and his attendance at the funeral of Governor Jackson of Missouri.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, June 23, 1863]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara describing his ill health. He remarks that he has had no letter from her, yet hopes to hear from her before the end of the war. Included in the letter are remarks on troop movements; a request for a photograph; talk of good crops; family updates; and the weather.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, June 30, 1863]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara declaring his love and stating the importance of communication between them. He includes news of his health; troop locations and news of the war.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, July 12, 1863]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara informing her of his improving health; the continuing problems of sickness among the troops; the movement of the troops; a description of how his wife can treat a problem with her face; and news of the war.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, July 18, 1863]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara in which he tries to set the record straight on his relationships with other women before their marriage. He was also concerned about the corn crop and the state of the garden. He writes down what he has read about President Lincoln's recently published proclamation that would take freed slaves and allow them to fight in the northern army (possibly the Emancipation Proclamation).
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 7, 1863]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara requesting that she look after the orchard, plant grapes, and care for the garden. He states his interest in teaching his daughters how to garden and "kitchen education" before other branches of learning. He describes his health and says that he has not lost any of his sick soldiers.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 9, 1863]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara in which tells her how often he has been receiving mail from her; troop movements and his speculation on what the Northern Army will do; how the populace is treated when the U. S. Army moves into their territory; illness among the men; his health; and seeds for his garden.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 28, 1863]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara describing the toll that sickness has taken on the Confederate troops; troop movements; demoralized troops deserting and going home; his personal health; and comments on family news.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, September 3, 1863]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara seeking to reassure her about his recovering health. He updates her on the sickness among the troops. He also comments on the dispirited populace and troops since the fall of Vicksburg.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 6, 1859]
Letter is from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing news from Bolivar, Tennessee and it includes: sending Kate off to school in Nashville,Maud's feelings about her children growing up, receiving Mary Tate's letter from White Sulphur Springs, Virginia, a dialogue about her stolen chickens,a conversation about Sallie starting school with Miss Hunt as her teacher and information about Jimmie and Willie's schooling, news about the weather,news about 'Aunt Mag' and her trip to Austin,a discussion about receiving no information on Wallace and his safe arrival,a dialogue about 'the babies dress and bonnets', and town news from Bolivar.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 26, 1859 ]
Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing Jimmie and Mary's return from their travels and their change in plans to board with Mr. Miller instead of Maud, Jimmie's financial proposition to exchange bottom land for David's lot, the town physician's move to Nashville, a financial proposition from Maud to purchase Sallie which is David's horse if Neely does not purchase her, Maud's preparations for Jimmie's party, a discussion about David's failed crops, a dialogue on the raising of stock prices, Maud's purchase of a cow for $25 from Bright, a dialogue concerning Maud's loss of cows, hogs, and a horse this year, news about sending gifts for the baby, and news about Kate's progress in boarding school.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her David Fentress, December 25, 1860]
Letter from M.(Maud)C. Fentress to her son David regarding the separation of the southern states from the union; the sale of slaves (Barb and her two children); breeding and care of a female slave named Eliza; hiring out of a slave; the capture and hanging of an abolitionist; and the health of those around her.
[A. C. Lenert Memorandum Book]
Photocopy of a handwritten memorandum book written by A. C. Lenert documenting his experiences as a member of Waul’s Texas Legion at the battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi.
[Copy of Narrative From A. C. Lenert Memorandum Book]
Photocopy of a partial, typed transcript of A. C. Lenert's memorandum book documenting his experiences as a member of Waul’s Texas Legion at the battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi. This transcription includes only the narrative portions of the memorandum book describing military experiences and is not formatted to match the original.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress - March 1, 1856]
Letter to David Fentress from his mother, Maud, discussing a compromise for the "Jones suit" that she was able to work out with his Uncle John, other news from his uncle, and a note about the local doctor buying a 15-year-old girl.
[Elizabeth Simpson Cooper Memoir]
Photocopy of Elizabeth Simpson Cooper's memoir about her childhood in Virginia and later her time in Kansas after moving westward with her family. In the text of her memoir, she describes her school days in Virginia, church, Cooper family history, "Bleeding Kansas" (the period of conflict over deciding if Kansas would be a free or a slave state), and the Civil War in Kansas as well as her personal encounters with Native Americans in Kansas.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, March 4, 1858]
Letter to David W. Fentress from his mother, Maud, discussing the receipt of his letter and his arrival at Prairie Lea; a request for Frank to write a letter informing Maud of his travels; a discussion of sending information and gifts; a brief discussion about marriage and gifts;a dialogue concerning "Episcopacy or Pickett"; news about the weather; the affect of the weather on the planting of crops; a discussion of real estate; a brief mention of Maud's health; a request for information on "how the presents went" and if pictures were received; a discussion requesting a visit from David's "Aunt", "Uncle", as well as from Tom and Frank; an ending statement requesting letters from David, Clara, and Frank.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 30, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara regarding the difficulties he faces applying for a transfer and/or a leave of absence. He states that he has 110 men in hospitals. Dr. Fentress's brigade is to march to Arkansas and only waits for Hardeman's Brigade to arrive. He also states that his men look forward to leaving Louisiana and moving to Arkansas.
[Letter from David Fentress to Clara Fentress, September 11, 1864]
Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara Fentress, describing his new orders to Houston, Texas. He also discusses the possibility of a leave of absence.
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, December 30, 1864]
Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara regarding his being ordered to take charge of Hospital No. 2 in Houston. The letter is badly faded, but it appears that he is discussing his plans for travel to take up his post.
[Letter from Sallie Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, May 17, 1859]
Letter from Sallie Fentress to her brother David discussing news from Bolivar and it includes:town health update; news that she and Kate are not going to school; a discussion about the locusts she catches every morning; a dialogue about the weather; a discussion about David's baby and how the family wishes that David, Clara, and baby would visit; and a dialogue about handmade bonnets and clothing made by Maud, Sallie, and Kate for Clara and the baby. Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David Fentress discussing news from Bolivar and it includes: a discussion about Aunt Susan's letter which details the doctor's resignation of professorship and his wishes to move to Memphis; a dialogue about the financial gains of friends who moved to Memphis; news about Kate's schooling; a discussion about locusts and the weather; news and updates on family and friends; a discussion on Kate's musical and vocal abilities; a dialogue about Sallie's musical abilities; and a discussion about the people staying with David's Uncle John and Aunt Anne's trip to Corinth.
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to one of her sons, October 19, 1862]
Letter from Maud Fentress to one of her sons- it is unclear if she's writing to David or Frank Fentress. In the letter she gives updates of the wars' effects on the local people and community. She gives updates on family and friends.
[Letter from Maud Fentress to one of her daughters, September 1863]
Letter from Maud Fentress to one of her daughters, however it is unclear who she is writing to. In the letter she gives updates on the changes that have been going on throughout the community during the war, and gives information on friends and family.
[Letter from Maud Fentress, October 10,1863]
Letter Maud Fentress wrote to her family regarding the problems she experienced when trying to send letters. She discusses the cotton crop and what her expenses are. The difficulties in acquiring a horse are given. She discusses the risk of capture, pillaging, and warns not to wear uniforms if going on furlough. She gives updates on family and friends. She expresses her anxiety over the freed slaves. She also gives her opinion on books she has read.