José L. Castillo Photograph Collection - 299 Matching Results

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[Adelfa Callejo and Hector Flores speak in front of a video camera]
Two immigration protesters, Adelfa Callejo and Hector Flores, appear to be in the midst of an interview - a video camera and microphone are pointed in their direction. A large crowd of protesters gather behind them.
[Adelfa Callejo at the Dallas Mega March]
Adelfa Callejo is a Dallas lawyer and civil rights activist who is a leader in the Hispanic community. She is seen here marching in the April 2006 "Mega March" in Dallas, Texas protesting immigration laws along with Hector Flores and other protestors.
[American flag on sombrero]
An American flag is attached to a multi-colored sombrero that is worn by an immigration protester.
[American flags]
Immigration protesters wave American flags at the April Mega March in Dallas.
[Animals]
A giraffe, zebras, and elephants at the Tyler zoo.
[Answering questions]
Robert answers question while his is filmed.
[Arturo Violante being interviewed]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
[Arturo Violante being interviewed in front of a video camera]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
[Arturo Violante speaking during an interview]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
[Arturo Violante speaking during an interview in front of a video camera]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
[Arturo Violante speaking in front of an audience]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
[Arturo Violante speaking in front of video camera]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
[At a meeting]
Robert Rivera speaks at meeting.
[At play]
A boy plays at being a fireman and pretends to drive a firetruck.
[At the podium]
Salvador Espino stands at a podium with microphone before speaking.
[Attendee at microphone]
A male attendee of the first North Texas Latino Council meeting speaks into a microphone while referencing a document.
[Attendee gestures with left hand while talking]
A male attendee gestures with his left hand as he speaks with other attendees of the first North Texas Latino Council.
[Attendee speaking at microphone]
A male attendee of the first North Texas Latino Council meeting speaks to panelists using a microphone.
[Attendee speaking to panelists]
An attendee of the first North Texas Latino Council meeting speaks to three panelists who sit at a table facing the audience.
[Attendees converse]
Attendees of the first North Texas Latino Council meeting converse amongst themselves.
[Audience listening to panelists]
The audience at the first North Texas Latino Council meeting listen to a group of three panelists sitting at a table facing the audience.
[Audience member speaks to panelists]
An attendee of the first North Texas Latino Council meeting addresses three panelists who are seated at a table facing the audience.
[Audience members]
Audience members of the first North Texas Latino Council meeting listen to speakers.
[Being asked a question]
Robert looks at the cameras.
[Being filmed]
Robert Rivera is filmed.
[Boy among a large crowd of protesters]
A young boy is lifted above a crowd of immigration protesters waving American flags. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[A boy and a giant globe]
A boy pushes on a giant globe.
[A boy and a globe]
A boy pushes a large globe at an exhibit.
[Boy and girl play with toys]
A boy and girl play with a table covered in plastic gears.
[Boy and stalagmite]
A boy leans against a stalagmite in a cave exhibit.
[A boy leans against an exhibit]
A boy leans against an exhibit.
[A boy leans on a giant globe]
A boy leans on a giant globe.
[Boy protester]
A young boy protester is seen amongst a crowd of immigration protesters, signs, and American flags. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Boy protester with American flag]
A young boy protester waves an American flag as he sits on the shoulders of another immigration protester. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Boy with American flag]
A young boy holds an American flag as he views the immigration march from the shoulders of another protester. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Camera man captures marching protesters]
Immigration protesters march in the April "Mega March" in downtown Dallas. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. Among those marching are Adelfa Callejo, a Dallas lawyer and civil rights activist who is a leader in the Hispanic community; Hector Flores, who has served as National President of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Director of Recruitment and Retention for the Dallas Independent School District, and an Equal Opportunity Specialist for the Office of Civil Rights within the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; and Domingo Garcia, a practicing attorney in Dallas who served as Mayor Pro Tem of Dallas, as a Dallas City Council member, and as a Texas legislator - he is the current General Counsel for the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), a Latino civil rights organization. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Cathedral Guadalupe]
Immigration protesters waving American flags pass a "Cathedral Guadalupe" sign and the Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe (Cathedral Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe) of Dallas in the background. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Chanting protesters with signs and American flags]
A large group of immigration protesters chant, hold protest signs in English and Spanish, and wave American flags. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Child playing]
A boy plays with Legos.
[Children and an exhibit]
Children look at an exhibit in action.
[Close-up of Gonzalo Barrientos, gesturing with his left hand]
Gonzalo Barrientos, Jr. was a Democratic member of the Texas Senate representing the 14th District from 1985 to 2007. He was also a member of the Texas House of Representatives from Austin from 1975 to 1985. This photo is a close-up view of Mr. Barrientos, gesturing with his left hand.
[Close-up of Gonzalo Barrientos, pointing with index finger]
Gonzalo Barrientos, Jr. was a Democratic member of the Texas Senate representing the 14th District from 1985 to 2007. He was also a member of the Texas House of Representatives from Austin from 1975 to 1985. This photo is a close-up view of Mr. Barrientos pointing upward with his index finger.
[Close-up of male protester]
Close-up photograph of a male immigration protester in Dallas. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Close-up of protester and sign]
Close-up photograph of a male immigration protester and a protest sign. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Close-up of woman combing young woman's hair]
No Description Available.
[A country store]
A country store with various dry goods is shown.
[Crowd in shadow]
A large crowd of protesters carrying signs and American flags gather in downtown Dallas, Texas. The downtown buildings cast a shadow over part of the crowd. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Crowd of immigration protesters]
A large crowd of protesters (some holding signs and many holding American flags) gather in downtown Dallas, Texas. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Crowd of immigration protesters in downtown Dallas]
A large gathering of immigration protesters with American flags and protest signs rally in downtown Dallas. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.
[Crowd of immigration protesters wave signs and American flags]
A large crowd of immigrations protesters wave signs and American flags. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform.