Are We There Yet? Transportation in Central Texas - 275 Matching Results

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[Train]

Description: A black and white photograph of a locomotive speeding by on the railroad tracks. There is a large black smoke stack coming from the top of the engine. There is a man standing on the gravel watching the train go by. It looks like winter as there are no leaves on the trees.
Date: 19uu
Partner: The Williamson Museum

[Wooden Bridge leading to Old Town Round Rock]

Description: Photograph of the wooden bridge leading into "Old Town" Round Rock around the turn of the century. This was also the Chisholm Trail, and Sam Bass rode over this bridge after an attempted bank robbery. The house on the left is known as the Jessie Sansom home. The building on the right was the church. The two-story home in the background was the Ledbetter home. The store past the church was the Mays and Black store. The bridge was dismantled during World War II and the metal supports were used during the scrap metal drives.
Date: 189u
Partner: The Williamson Museum

[Woodmen of the World float]

Description: Black and white photograph of a decorated wagon pulled by a team of horses. Wagon is decorated with crape paper and the acronym "W.O.W.". A large group of men stands in the wagon bed. The men are dressed in evening wear and most carry woodsman tools. One holds a large U.S. flag. Also on the wagon stands a large white goat. There are two men dressed in evening wear standing behind the wagon and one in a buggy parked in front of the wagon. A young man wearing a pork pie hat holds the wagon horses. A two story building in the background bears the W.O.W. logo. Round Rock Texas USA! notes: "Woodmen of the World Group. L to R: Skete Thorp, Mr. Miller, E. W. Swenson, Charley Robertson, Jack Lynn Bradley, O. L. Brady, Leonard Hall, Bud Killen, Bud Grumbles, Fred Caswell, Jeff Fouse, Lee McDonald and Walter Henna in back. COMPLIMENTS OF ROUND ROCK MOTOR COMPANY." The Woodmen of the World is a fraternal organization.
Date: 19uu
Partner: The Williamson Museum