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The Clock and the Storyteller: Memoirs of Shirley Clark
This book is part of 'Telling Our Stories,' a humanities project at Austin College and contains the autobiographical anecdotes of Shirley Clark about her family and life in Texas.
Memories of the 20th Century: Stories by Eleanor Monroe
This book is part of 'Telling Our Stories,' a humanities project at Austin College and contains the autobiographical anecdotes of Eleanor Monroe about her family and life in Sherman, Texas.
More Texas Family Secrets
A collection of reminiscences, each preceded by a brief biographical sketch of the author.
Texas Millennium Book: the way things used to be
A collection of reminiscences, each preceded by a brief biographical sketch of the author.
Remembering School Days
A collection of reminiscences, each preceded by a brief biographical sketch of the author.
Telling our stories: Grayson County reminiscences: the first 150 years, 1846-1996
A collection of reminiscences, each preceded by a brief biographical sketch of the author.
Texas Family Secrets
This book represents the collective work of forty local writers. Texas Family Secrets is the second book of stories published by 'Telling Our Stories,' a humanities project at Austin College. Each story is preceded by a brief biographical sketch of the author.
[Elector Registration in Belton, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout]
Elector registration in Belton, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout that certifies that John meets all the qualifications for being an elector. The registrar of voters, R. D. Kinney, signed to prove that the aforementioned information was correct on October 17, 1872.
[Voter Certificate for John Patterson Osterhout]
Voter certificate for John Patterson Osterhout in Bell county, certified by James Leach, county clerk. The seal of the district court for Bell county is on the certificate.
[Letter of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Letter of appointment to Public Notary for John Patterson Osterhout for the county of Austin. It was signed by the governor of Texas, Peter Hansborough Bell, and the Secretary of State.
[Certificate of Appointment to Postmaster for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of Appointment to Postmaster of Belton, Texas presented to John Patterson Osterhout. The document was signed by the president, Benjamin Harrison, and the postmaster general, John Wanamaker. He was able to hold the position until the end of the next session of the Senate.
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public by Charles Allen Culberson, governor of Texas, for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the Secretary of State and the governor of Texas. It allowed John to work in this office in Bell County.
[Certificate of Appointment to Postmaster for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Postmaster by President Chester Alan Arthur for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the President and the Postmaster General, Walter Q. Gresham. It certified John to work as Postmaster in Belton, Texas.
[Marriage Certificate for John Patterson and Junia Roberts Osterhout]
Marriage certificate for John Patterson and Junia Roberts Osterhout officiated by William Frear of the Baptist church. The wedding was held at the house of Henry Roberts in Pennsylvania and witnessed by P. M. Osterhout, James Frear, and Henry Roberts.
[Certificate of Appointment to Consular Agent for Paul Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to consular agent by the Secretary of State, Alvey A. Adee, for Paul Osterhout. The certificate gave him all the power of the position in Bocas del Toro, Panama.
[Certificate of the Election to Adjutant for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of the election to adjutant of the 23rd Battalion of the Texas State Troops for John Patterson Osterhout. It was part of a rally for troops for the Civil War and the certificate was signed by the governor, Francis Richard Lubbock, and the Secretary of State.
[Certificate of the Election to Justice of the Peace for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of the election to the Justice of the Peace for John Patterson Osterhout signed by Texas governor Sam Houston and the Secretary of State.
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public in Texas for John Patterson Osterhout signed by the Texas governor, Elisha M. Pease, and the Secretary of State, Edward Clark. In the center of the certificate is a hole that renders parts of it unreadable.
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public in Austin County, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the Texas governor, Hardin Runners Runnels, and the Secretary of State, J. S. Anderson.
[Letter from Mary to her Sister, October 16, 1887]
Letter from Mary to her sister regarding their mother's death. She detailed the last moments of her mother and the funeral. She ended her letter by wishing her sister could have been there to help lessen the mourning process.
[Voter Certificate for John Patterson Osterhout]
Voter certification for John Patterson Osterhout issued by the Secretary of State in the state of Texas. It certified that starting on July 11, 1870, John was a qualified voter in Bell county.
[Letter from J. R. Roberts to Sister, November 24, 1878]
Letter from J. R. Roberts to sister. J. R. thanked his sister for gifts that were sent and went on to update her on what was happening in their families' lives. The letter ended with a mention that people were searching for land claims in the area and the author wanted their mother to not worry about them.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, July 17, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. He wrote his wife from his travels and informed her that he had finished court, but would be unable to return home until he raised the means to get back.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, August 18, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. John wrote his wife while she was away visiting family. He updated her about how their family was doing, a trade he made, and an event that their children attended. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. Osterhout."
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, August 26, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. John wrote about how their family was faring while Junia was away. He mentioned a church meeting they attended recently that saw many baptisms and conversions. He told her that he would send her money around Christmas if she wanted to return home.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout to Family, September 6, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, and children. He wrote his wife while she was away. He told her that their son, Paul, was house-sitting for someone in the neighborhood and had the unfortunate news that a woman's baby had died.
[Letter from Paul Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 21, 1879]
Letter from Paul Osterhout to his mother, Junia Roberts Osterhout. Paul wrote his mother a letter he promised while she was visiting family. He told his mother that he was watching Brother Smith's house while the Methodists had a meeting elsewhere. Paul was working to get into the railroad business and mentioned that the youth in town had tried, unsuccessfully, to get a dance started. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout."
[Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout and Family, September 21, 1879]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her husband, John Patterson Osterhout, and family. Junia wrote to him while visiting family in Pennsylvania. The letter is composed of how various family members were doing and who Junia had been visiting. She mentioned that a family member wanted her to visit somewhere else, but Junia was unsure if she would have the money.
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Ora and Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 21, 1879]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her sisters, Ora and Junia Roberts Osterhout. She wrote to her sisters while they were visiting family with their mother. She let her sisters know of some guests that had stopped by to see them. Gertrude hoped that her younger sisters were behaving and enjoying their time with family.
[Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout and Family, September 24, 1878]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her husband, John Patterson Osterhout, and family. Junia wrote her husband and children while she was visiting family in Pennsylvania. She told them who she had been seeing and still needed to stay with. Junia let her family know that she wanted to return before Christmas, but needed money sent to her.
[Letter from Harry Frear to Ora and Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 27, 1879]
Letter from Harry Frear to his cousins, Ora and Junia Roberts Osterhout. The brief letter explained that Harry mistakenly opened a letter that was meant for someone else. He told the girls that he missed them and hoped they could visit soon.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 28, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 28, 1879. John began his letter with bad news. A fire broke out in Belton, Texas and John wrote of the difficulties he and his sons had in trying to save some of his books and papers. Otherwise, John says he and the children are in good health and mentioned work that Paul had done work in a telegraph office recently. Included is an envelope addressed "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout" and an article titled "Fire in Belton!" The article lists the losses incurred from the disaster.
[Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, October 10,1879]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her husband, John Patterson Osterhout. Junia wrote her husband while she and a couple of their children were visiting family. She mentioned various family members that were sick and that her two daughters had bad colds. The letter ended with her story about the news of a fire that broke out in Belton, Texas.
[Letter from [Geo] Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, October 12, 1879]
Letter from [Geo] Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout. [Geo] wrote John to let him know how John's wife and daughter, Ora, were doing away from home. He mentioned an older family member that was about to start up a business nearby. Included is an envelope addressed to "Hon. J. P. Osterhout."
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 13, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. John wrote his wife while she was away visiting family. He told her that their son, Paul, might be making progress in the telegraph business and that a local priest was conducting a protracted meeting. The county fair was about to begin, although John did not think they would take much part in it. He ended the letter by stating that he was not sure when Junia planned on returning.
[Letter from Sarah Frear to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 19, 1879]
Letter from Sarah Frear to her sister, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing a letter received from sister Amy. She asked Junia how her daughters, Ora and Junia, were doing and asked where they would be next so she could try to visit.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 24, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, regarding the departure of their son, Paul, who left home in order to manage a telegraph office in another town. John continued his letter with local news, including the county fair, various persons who were on trial, and a Methodist protracted meeting at a local church.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 26, 1879]
A letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing how family life had been since Junia left to visit with extended family. John let her know of local baptisms and poultry sales he had made at the recent fair. He and their daughter, Gertrude, were looking forward to Junia's return home. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout."
[Postcard from Ann Farman to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 28, 1879]
A postcard from Ann Farman to her sister, Junia Roberts Osterhout, expressing Ann's desire to see Junia before she returns home. She told Junia she could not visit yet because her mother was feeling ill and she was disappointed that Junia could not visit.
[Envelope to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 30, 1879]
Envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout," Junia Roberts Osterhout, in Factoryville, Pennsylvania. The envelope is postmarked for October 30, 1879 from Belton, Texas.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 29, 1879]
A letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, expressing his regret that the house felt lonesome without Junia and the three children that were away. He hopes that his son, Paul, will return to live with them if the telegraph company relocates him to an office in town. John then told Junia that when she was ready to make the return home, she should consider whether or not to purchase a second class ticket for the train.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, October 30, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, discussing family life since Paul's departure to work at a telegraph office in another city. He told his son about the recent successful sales of poultry he made and that he had hopes for Paul's future career. John gave his son advice and hoped he would be able to come home and visit soon. Included is an envelope addressed to "Paul Osterhout."
[Letter from Ann Farman to Sarah Frear, 1879]
Letter from Ann Farman to her sister, Sarah Frear, with the unfortunate news about a death in the family. Ann wrote about Veda's final moments and the modest burial they held for her.
[Envelope to Junia Osterhout, October 20, 1879]
Envelope addressed to "Mrs. Junia Osterhout" in Falls, Pennsylvania. The stamp on the front is addressed Factoryville, PA on October 20, 1879.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout and Family, November 2, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, and family with news from Belton, Texas. He claimed to be lonesome because his wife and two youngest daughters were visiting family in Pennsylvania and their eldest son Paul had moved out. He told her about how the remaining children at home were doing and shared other pieces of news from Belton. The letter ended with him prompting her to write more and to send notice before she starts for home. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout."
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, November 9, 1875]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing his travels through Texas. John served as a district judge and was traveling with several lawyers. He told Junia he had arrived at his most recent destination safely and hoped that she and the children were well.
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, November 13, 1879]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her brother, Paul Osterhout, discussing recent news in Belton, Texas. She told him that their mother, Junia Roberts Osterhout, had not yet returned home and updated him on recent baptisms and conversions at the local church. She mentioned temperance meetings she had been attending and a trip she had made recently to collect pecans.
[Card for Miss Carrie McIlhenny]
A card with the name Miss Carrie McIlhenny on the front. There are no other identifying features on the card.
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, December 1, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, discussing family news in Belton, Texas. John's wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, and two daughters returned from visiting family in Pennsylvania. He wrote about the state of his cattle and chickens and how he was tending to them. The letter ended with John hoping that Paul would join them for Christmas. Included is an envelope addressed to "Paul Osterhout."
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, December 3, 1879]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her brother, Paul Osterhout, discussing family news in Belton, Texas. Because their mother has been wanting to see Paul ever since she returned from Pennsylvania, Gertrude hopes he will be able to return for Christmas. Gertrude told him that she had been appointed assistant conductor of a local temperance club. Gertrude ended the letter early because there were visitors at her home.