Boyce Ditto Public Library - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

The Crazy Well Water Company

Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. The recto folio describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Date: 1920?

[Two Old-Time Stores]

Description: This picture appears to show two stores that stand cheek-by-jowl. A saddlery on the far left shares space with a furniture storethat also sold cofins. The sign over the stores combines their functions in a way that would--under other circumstances--seem comical. The building itself was located at the corner of SE 1st, and South Oak Streets. A note on the photograph states that it was south of the MARTIN BUILDING. It was once the McBrayer-Armstrong Grocery, then later the Nash Hardware store. The location of Lattner eventually became the Buy-Rite store [116 South Oak Avenue, at the corner of SE 1st Street, until some time in the early 1980's]. The road is unpaved, there is no evidence of lighting--except for the lamp mounted on a post at the front of the building. The horse-drawn hearse (without its horse or plumes) suggests that although it was in front of the stores, it was not at the time in use. The picture, therefore, dates from the end of the 19th century--or the earliest 20th century.
Date: unknown

Colonial Hotel

Description: The Colonial Hotel at 115 W. Hubbard Street was built by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, and its name was changed to The Damron Hotel. The popular hotel burned down December 22, 1975 along with several other adjoining businesses.
Date: unknown

Mineral Wells Hardware

Description: The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...."
Date: unknown

The Carlsbad of America

Description: Shown here is the battered title page of a pamphlet about Mineral Wells, calling it "The Carlsbad of America." It gives the property valuation (ending in 1905), and the population of the city (also ending in 1905). A colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet remarks "Texas An Empire---A nation within a Nation." The pamphlet reports itself as the work of the Index Printing Company.
Date: unknown

The Brain Busters

Description: The modern viewer is likely to be appalled by this picture, but black-face comedy was considered a socially acceptable form of entertainment until after World War II. The pamphlet suggests that "The Brain Busters" were a series of difficult questions sent in to the duo by listeners to their radio program. "February" has been identified as Francis Quinn (one of the players in the band of Jack Amlung), and "Sugar Cane" was said to be Amlung's announcer, Conrad Brady.
Date: unknown