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[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture.
Date: unknown

The Health Resort Quarterly, 1 of 4, Cover

Description: The cover of The (October 1915) Health Resort Quarterly, published by the Commercial Club of Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The wreath on the cover frames a lady's arm and hand holding a glass of (mineral) water with captions "ANALYSIS HAS PROVED IT TO HAVE NO EQUAL" above and "FAMED THE WORLD OVER" below, referring to the mineral water from the local wells. A colophon at bottom reads: "Index Print [symbol] Mineral Wells."
Date: October 1915

[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

Description: Spectators are shown here, at a spring play-day frolic at Elmhurst Park around 1910. The popular park once boasted a Casino, a Dancing Pavilion, Exhibit Halls, and Outdoor Sports Fields. It hosted the County Fair and sports events until 1913. On the closure of Elmhurst Park, the City of Mineral Wells became the owner of the property. It was used for a housing development during World War II to accommodate families of soldiers and civilian workers at Camp Wolters. The City of Mineral Wells built city's water treatment facilities on the site of the former park after World War II.
Date: 1910?

Points of Interest in and About Mineral Wells

Description: A photograph of a collage in a Mineral Wells Area Chamber of Commerce advertisement includes a postcard that pictures points of interest in and about the city. Pictured are: An aerial view of Camp Wolters, the Recreation Center showing a theater, gymnasium, and PX, with an inset of the base hospital; Possum Kingdom Dam and part of the eponymous lake; a local beauty queen; an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas; Lake Mineral Wells (with the island that was inundated when the dam was subsequently raised); a view from Inspiration Point south of the city; and the Baker Hotel. The text publicizes the various assets and tourist attractions to be found in and around the "City Built on Water." One photograph in the collage is upside-down.
Date: 1950?

[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]

Description: A 1906 seasonal advertisement, compliments Central Texas Realty Association, depicts a young lady (An Art Nouveau goddess?) half-kneeling within a frame that suggests stained glass. She is holding a water jug, from which pours a stream of healing elixir that splashes into the lowermost center of the brochure. Decorative scrolls reminiscent of wrought iron sculpture decorate the advertisement. Stars, both in the advertisement and on the lady's tiara, hint that Mineral Wells is the City of Light. What appears to be a coffee stain shows at the upper left. Someone has penciled "1905" in the upper right corner.
Date: 1906

[Downtown Mineral Wells, 2 of 3: A Different View]

Description: This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells shows (left to right): Hill's Ladies' Apparel; Cole's House of flowers; (Intersecting street): George's Man's Shop; the Professional Building (formerly the Texas Theater); Poston's Dry Goods;Palace Saloon; Marsden's Shoe Store (former Gem theater). The Crazy Hotel is visible in the background.
Date: September 1988

[Downtown Mineral Wells: 1 of 3]

Description: This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells was taken looking north on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) from SE 1st Street (US Highway 180 E). The visible buildings are: (on the left), Hill's Ladies' Apparel, Cole's House of Flowers, (at the intersecting street, [Hubbard Street--US Hwy. 180 W]), and George's Men's Store. Lynch Plaza and a parking lot are on the right, with the Texas Historical Commission marker on the wall in the lower right-hand corner commemorating the first mineral-water well in the City. In the background, the First State Bank can also be seen (also on the intersecting Hubbard Street, US Highway 180 W.)
Date: September 1988

[Lynch Plaza , 1 of 3]

Description: This photograph of Lynch Plaza and The First State Bank (now Home Health in 2008) was taken from the 100 block of South Oak Street. The Gentleman's Closet is next to the bank (The store is vacant as of 2008). The Baker Hotel can be seen above Lynch Plaza, at the corner of E. Hubbard and S. Oak Streets.
Date: September 1988

[A Corner of Oak Avenue and East Hubbard Street]

Description: This picture shows the northeast corner of the intersection of Hubbard Street (US Hwy. 180) and Oak Avenue (US Hwy. 281), the center of downtown Mineral Wells. In this picture are The First State Bank, The Gentleman's Closet, and Lorene's Fabrics. The First State Bank began at this location, with Leon Cowan as president and Tony Street and Leon Groves as vice-presidents. The City National Bank was once located here, but moved to their new location at 1900 E. Hubbard Street. The Gentleman's Closet and Lorene's Fabrics occupied a newly-remodeled building to the right (east) of the bank. George's Men's Shop was one of the businesses in the building across Oak Avenue to the left and west of the First State Bank.
Date: 1989?

[First State Bank and The Gentlemen's Closet]

Description: This photograph has been tentatively dated to the 1980's. Notice the mailbox at the corner--a rarity in Mineral Wells at the present [2013] time. The street appears to be devoid of markings. The picture shows the First State Bank, which began business at the southwest corner of the 100 block of East Hubbard with a drive-in teller and parking lot at the back of the bank. The First State Bank president was Leon Cowan; vice-presidents were Tony Street and Leon Groves. The First State Bank occupied the northeast corner of N. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Streets after The City National Bank (now First Financial Bank) moved from here to its current [2008] location at 1900 W. Hubbard Street. First State Bank is now [2008] located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The building now [2013] houses the offices for the Mineral Wells Hospice. The Gentleman's Closet, next door, was a man's haberdashery. It was a remodeled store that had been occupied by a number of previous businesses. It is presently [2013] vacant.
Date: 1989?

[The 100 Block of West Hubbard]

Description: This picture is an illustration of the south side of the 100 block of West Hubbard Street, looking southeast. The north side (and back view) of Cole's Florist and Hill's Style Shop can be seen at the center of the picture. Lynch Plaza, the darker brick building, is in the left middle background. Oak Avenue (U.S. Highway 281) extends north-south between Cole's House of Flowers and Lynch Plaza. Cole's occupies the site of the former Davidson Hardware, which burned along with the Damron Hotel in 1975. Lynch Plaza, the site of the mineral-water discovery well, was built on the site where the former Oxford Hotel burned in 1983. The parking lot seen in the right foreground of the picture was the site of the Damron Hotel.
Date: September 1988

[A Back View of Businesses on the West Side of 100 Block and S. Oak]

Description: Businesses are shown here at the southwest corner of West Hubbard Street and South Oak Avenue: The location of the original Colonial Hotel. (It was originally built in 1906 by J.T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country, and it was renamed the Damron Hotel about 1917 when Agnew and Bessie Damron traded a ranch for it. The hotel burned in 1975.) The small white building in the left middle foreground is a back view of Cole's House of Flowers (where Davidson's Hardware also burned in the Damron Hotel fire), next to it is Hill's Style Shoppe and Mineral Wells Office Supply. The vacant lot in the foreground is the location of the former Damron hotel. At the far left edge of the picture, to the east and across Oak Avenue, is Lynch Plaza which was built on the site of the former Oxford Hotel, that burned in 1983, along with the First National Bank. Lynch Plaza is named for J.A. Lynch, Mineral Wells' founder. who had a well drilled at this location in 1880, and discovered the source of mineral water that made Mineral Wells the most popular health spa in the nation at the turn of the twentieth century. A Texas Historical Commission Marker commemorating the discovery-well is embedded in a brick wall surrounding the parking lot of Lynch Plaza. Obscurely in middle distance, at the right edge of the picture, south and across SW 1st Street, are the offices of the Palo Pinto County Abstract Company and those of the City of Mineral Wells.
Date: 1988?

[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and Lynch Plaza Parking Lot]

Description: The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Savings and Loan building, in this 1988 view (looking south down SE 1st Avenue), is in the left foreground on the southeast corner of Hubbard and 1st Avenue. Across SE 1st Avenue (to the right and west of the Savings and Loan) is the parking lot for Lynch Plaza. In the background, the next street south is SE 1st Street. The Dollar General store occupies the former Piggly Wiggly grocery store on the southeast corner of this next block (near the center of the picture), where Mineral Wells' first Post Office once stood. The Savings and Loan building was eventually torn down, and the First State Bank is now [2008] at this location.
Date: 1988

{The Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Monument: Senator Tom Creighton Speaks]

Description: Texas State Senator Tom Creighton delivers the keynote address at the dedication of a memorial marker to W.P. (Bill) Cameron at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. Mr. Cameron was the Editor of the Mineral Wells Index newspaper, and an active and popular participant in local civic and social events. After his death, his family placed a marker in his honor at the museum. Members of Mr. Cameron's family are seated to the speaker's left, and the Junior High Ensemble, Director Vicki Carden, are on the museum steps behind and to the speaker's right, Please contact the collection webmaster if you recognize other persons in the picture. The marker has been removed, and its location is not known at this time.[see previous photographs for more details.] Very dimly visible in an enlarged photo, inside the open door of the museum, is an original five-pointed wooden star that decorated a gable of the historic Hexagon House Hotel.
Date: April 14, 1978
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 19 of 21, Two People Looking South from North]

Description: The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the heyday of Mineral Wells as a popular resort city. It burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture shows the front entrance under a dark plume of black smoke, with flames breaking through the upper floors of the front wall. Two people (one with a hard hat, and one without)stand observing the proceedings.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 10 of 21]

Description: Another in the extensive series of photographs that covered the spectacular holiday fire that completely consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas season is shown here. This picture shows some of the early response to the fire. Note, for example, the electrical utility truck, which has arrived to cut off electrical power to the buildings. The Damron Hotel (which was built during the days when Mineral Wells was a resort) was originally named the Colonial Hotel. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. The sign "Pemberton Appliance and Plumbing", located across the street west, is visible. Pemberton's also suffered damage in the fire, but by 7:30 the next day, workmen were installing plate glass in it.
Date: December 22, 1975