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Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: Shown here is another picture of the Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas. The Carlsbad was one of the early mineral water drinking pavilions in "the city built on water," located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad was on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway Line. Gasoline-powered trolleys, known as the "Dinky Cars", operated at 15-minute intervals between Mineral Wells and Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1909.
Date: 1905?

The Star Well Water Company

Description: The Star Well Water Company was located in the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue (then called "Mesquite Street"). A. F. Weaver remarks on page 53 of "Time Was...," that "Selling mineral water and establishing bath houses was [sic] big business for 'The Nations Greatest Health Resort'."
Date: unknown

[The Carlsbad Well: First Building]

Description: The first Carlsbad Well drinking pavilion was built about 1895. The Carlsbad (also known as the Texas Carlsbad Well), one of the early drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS [sic] wife/ Makes a wife love HER [sic] husband/ Robs the divorce court of its business/ Takes the temper out of red-headed people/ Puts ginger into ginks/ And pepper into plodders." The pavilion was prominent in several pictures around the turn of the century; this picture--labeled "Sept. 19/07" in ink--was from an advertisement by the Yeager Drug Company. This early pavilion had been demolished by 1911, and replaced by a larger brick structure.
Date: September 19, 1907

Texas Carlsbad Well [3 of 3: People on Porch]

Description: The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, was one of the early mineral water wells in Mineral Wells. It was located directly across the street, and west of the first Crazy Water Well drinking pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad Pavilion is prominent in several pictures taken in 1908, but this structure was demolished and replaced with a brick structure in 1911. This picture is slightly cropped but it is slightly sharper in certain areas than the previous two pictures.
Date: 1905?

Crazy Radio Theatre

Description: According to A. F. Weaver, in his book "Time was in Mineral Wells", the Crazy Radio Theatre broadcast from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel in Mineral Wells over the Texas Quality Network. The show's origin is said to be the selling of "Crazy Water Crystals." Identified are Hal Collins (Manager of the Crazy Hotel), Paul, Ludy, Dick, Jake, Slim. [No last names are given.] Please note the early 12-string steel guitar held by Paul.
Date: 1933?

[The Calvary Baptist Parsonage 1975]

Description: This home was the parsonage for the Calvary Baptist Church in 1975. The home has a rock facade and appears to have a porch on the side of the structure. This is one of a series of pictures of the church and parsonage showing structural damage, prior to their demolition and replacement with more modern structures. The original church faced south on SE 5th Street, and its replacement occupies the same city block but faces west on SE 6th Avenue.
Date: unknown

Daniel Photo 1907

Description: Shown is a group of seven women (riding "sidesaddle" as was the fashion for women at the time), two men and a boy, all riding donkeys. A handwritten note on the photograph's mat identifies it as: "Daniel Photo 1907." The identities of the people are unknown, but the caption suggests this could have been a Daniel family outing. Riding donkeys over the "mountains" of Mineral Wells was a popular pastime of the day. The picture appears to have been taken atop East Mountain in Mineral Wells, which was a popular destination. Souvenir photographs of of the donkey trails survive from the early days. [There was a Daniel's Studio located in the 200 block of N. Oak Avenue in the early days of Mineral Wells, and this photograph is likely to have come from that collection. In which case, the group shown here could have been unrelated.]
Date: 1907

[A Donkey on 6th Street Mineral Wells, 1916]

Description: Donkeys were still prevalent in 1916, and so were the grass-grown steel tracks of the "Dinky Cars" (Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway which had ceased operations in 1909) on NW 6th Street. The house to the left is probably Colonial Revival--an example of the architecture of this time. The source of the photograph is A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." first edition, 1975, on page 82.
Date: 1916

[A Fun Day in Mineral Wells]

Description: Four individuals are shown here, out for a day of fun. From left to right are: Joe Myers, Ida McLendon, Hamp Russell and Elizabeth Crisp. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells," first edition, page 71. The photograph was taken on one of the donkey paths on East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys. He was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife then took over the donkeys, and built a rock house on the trail as a background for souvenir pictures.
Date: unknown

[The First Presbyterian Church]

Description: Shown here is the south side of the third First Presbyterian Church building, at 300 NW 4th Ave., and the second one at this site. Due to structural damage to the foundation, the building was torn down during the 1980's and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church building - the third at this location. The building reflects an eclectic architecture, principally in Neo-classic style.
Date: 1980

[Pediment on the Second Building of the First Presbyterian Church]

Description: This photograph shows the pediment of the south-west entrance to the First Presbyterian Church (This is its third building) at 300 NW 4th Avenue. The acanthus ornaments on top of the pediment (in Classical times, a guard against dripping rain), have no real function. The dentils that line the interior of the pediment are not Classical, nor are the capitals of of the pillars.
Date: 1980

[First Presbyterian Church - 1 of 13: Front View]

Description: This photograph is the first in a series of pictures of architectural details that was taken prior to demolition of the Presbyterian church of Mineral Wells. The first church in Mineral Wells built by the Presbyterians in 1883 was located at the southwest corner of what is now the Crazy Hotel block. The early church served both the Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, and was sold to the Baptist congregation. The First Presbyterian Church was built at 300 NW 4th Avenue in 1896, and burned in 1908 This domed structure replaced it. This picture shows the front entrance to the Sanctuary of this second First Presbyterian Church in Mineral Wells, Texas, built in 1909, at this location. This picturesque building survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed the two-by-three city block area surrounding it. The building suffered serious structural deterioration to its foundation, and was replaced in the the 1980's by a more modern structure.
Date: 1980
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Front entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church]

Description: This picture of the main entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church at 300 NW 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, shows the unique dome that topped the picturesque structure. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed about six city blocks surrounding it. Foundation structural damage caused the church to be replaced by a more modern structure in the 1980's. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver Collection showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches.
Date: 1980
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Second First Presbyterian Church]

Description: A view barely showing the dome atop the second First Presbyterian Church, which was built in 1909, and located at 300 NW 4th Avenue is shown here. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914 that destroyed about six city blocks east of the church. Structural damage to the basement caused the building to be replaced in the 1980's by a more modern structure. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver collection, showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches.
Date: 1980
Creator: Weaver, A. F.