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ABOUT BROWSE FEED

[Dust-proof, Round Windows of Motor Chair Car]

Description: Shown here is an interior view of a motor car, called by the locals the "Doodle Bug", showing the port-hole windows that were characteristic of all motor-cars built by William McKeen. They were claimed to be dust-proof. Two of these 70-foot, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, 81-passenger motor cars made a round trip daily from Graford, Texas, through Mineral Wells to Dallas from June 11,1912 to April 23, 1929. They were joined March 27, 1913 by a similar coach on the Gulf Texas & Western (GT&W) line that ran from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro to Salesville where it traveled over the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells,& Northwestern) rails through Mineral Wells and on to Dallas. Motor-car service was re-established (suggesting that it must have been been abated) between Fort Worth and Mineral Wells on June 6, 1913, at the order of the Texas Railroad Commission. The Weatherford "Daily Herald" reported that a steam train would replace the motor-cars on April 22, 1913, "...on account of the very crowded condition of the motor car...[which] has occasioned so much discomfort and dissatisfaction on the part of the travelling public." Since the motor-cars were reported to be still running in 1929, one may draw one's own conclusion. This picture is on page 93 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", First Edition, 1975.
Date: unknown

[An Early Car at the Crazy Well Flats]

Description: Frank Richards (The driver, identified as "Dad") sits in a Thomas Flyer, parked at the Crazy Pavilion, in late October (or early November) of 1909. Dust on the car, extra spare tires, and a sign on the spares, indicate they have been involved in a "Pathfinder Endurance" run (from Fort Worth to San Angelo) for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The driver and passenger are dressed in typical "duster" clothing for cross-country travel. Frank Richards went on to maintain a successful Abstract company in Mineral Wells. His father, Thomas Richards, had the Star Wells Company in Mineral Wells. A cigar sign in the window suggests this was the drug store, then located in the southeast corner of the Crazy Flats. A sign on the hotel also advertises rooms for rent in addition to its being a mineral water drinking pavilion.
Date: unknown

[An Early Delivery Truck]

Description: An early delivery truck, whose wording (on the side reads) "R.O. Norman, Tailor, Cleaning & Pressing, phone 514", is shown here. Note the vertical windshield, and the crank on the front of the truck. Note also the 3-digit telephone number on the side of the truck.
Date: unknown

[An Early Street Scene in Mineral Wells]

Description: This photograph shows the corner of Mesquite and Coke Streets (Now [2008] NE 1st Avenue and NE 2nd Street) The picture was taken in 1912 after the Ben Hur motor car had stopped running (note its tracks). The Whatley Motor Company is now located where the Livery Stable was on the left at the time of the picture. The "Old Post Office" replaced the buildings on the right, and the Chautauqua was the large white building a block further up the street at the center. Information about this photograph was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", on page 82. The former Coke Street is labeled "Moore Street" (which was actually four blocks further north). The picture dates to 1905 when the "Dinky" car operation began and the Chautauqua was constructed.
Date: unknown

[An Early View of Mineral Wells, Left Portion]

Description: An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells, looking from the South Mountain to the northeast is shown here. Note: The Hexagon House (middle upper right), First Baptist Church (two white spires in middle right), Chautauqua (far upper right), West Ward School (large building at left middle with "Little Rock School" immediately to this side). [This is the left portion of a contiguous pair of pictures that make up this view. The right portion of the photograph is shown following.]
Date: unknown

[An Early View of Mineral Wells: Right Portion]

Description: An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells from South Mountain looking northeast, this picture gives the other side of a photograph, which, with the preceding, comprise one picture. The Exchange Hotel (upper left of the picture below East Mountain, with Dr. Thompson's home to its immediate right is visible) This is approximately the northeast edge of the City Business District, but other landmarks cannot be identified.
Date: unknown

Fairfield Inn, Mineral Wells, Tex

Description: Shown here is a an extensively damaged and repaired postcard of the Fairfield Inn. The inn, built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was located at 814 N. Oak Avenue and faced west. The postcard is addressed to A. J. Ryder, Mallory Docks, Galveston, Texas. The postmark it bears dates to 1911.
Date: unknown

Famous Mineral Water

Description: The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis.
Date: 1970?

[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture.
Date: unknown

First National Bank

Description: The first National Bank, at the southeast corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983.
Date: 1970?

First Presbyterian Church in 1896

Description: Handwritten notes on this old newspaper clipping indicate that it was given by M. J. Graham to A. F. Weaver, and correctly reports that the church structure burned August 25, 1908. The article erroneously states that it burned July 4, 1914. The article appears to have been published in the Mineral Wells Index. The caption reads: "Crowd attends dedication of the wooden church as it nears completion in the summer of 1896, when the edifice was dedicated to the Lord and mankind. On July 4th, 1914, the church was destroyed by one of the most disastrous fires in the history of Mineral Wells, when 34 residences and hotels, for two blocks east and west, and four blocks north--from Hubbard St. to NW 4th Street--burned. Every place from Hubbard north to 4th Street except the Tygrett home. "The present church was constructed some two years after the wooden church burned, on the same site--the corner NW 2nd Street and NW 4th Avenue. Perhaps some of the youngsters in the picture are living in the community today [2013]. Picture made available by M. J. Graham from his file of papers and pictures on the history of Presbyterianism in this community. "Until the present domed brick church was completed, the Presbyterians held Sunday School and church on the lower floor of the Odd Fellow Building in the 200 block on North Oak." The domed brick church mentioned in the article was built in 1909, (at a cost of $15,000, according to the El Paso Morning Times of 1909) and was replaced by a third church at this location in the 1980's due to structural deterioration. Please note: The picture in this article has been slightly cropped from it's original form, which is also in the A. F. Weaver Collection with the title [First ...
Date: unknown

First State Bank & Trust Company

Description: The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown

[The Firstron Building After a Fire]

Description: The Firstron Building occupied the site of the Oxford Hotel (which burned down)and was itself replaced by the First National Bank (which moved away). The building burned in 1983. Lynch Plaza now [2012] occupies the site. The sign in front of the remains of the Firstron Building reads: Firstron Building OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 325-4461 ROOM 300 It invites ironic comment. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition, on page 186.
Date: unknown

Fog

Description: This booklet gives an overview of fog as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Types of fog and factors for formation and dissipation; flight procedures when fog has been forecasted or encountered en route"; and the en-route weather aids available to the aviator." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page.
Date: January 1970
Creator: Turgeon; Sukalski & Maerk, A.