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Fairfield Inn, Mineral Wells, Tex

Description: Shown here is a an extensively damaged and repaired postcard of the Fairfield Inn. The inn, built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was located at 814 N. Oak Avenue and faced west. The postcard is addressed to A. J. Ryder, Mallory Docks, Galveston, Texas. The postmark it bears dates to 1911.
Date: unknown

Famous Mineral Water

Description: The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis.
Date: 1970?

[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture.
Date: unknown

First National Bank

Description: The first National Bank, at the southeast corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983.
Date: 1970?

First Presbyterian Church in 1896

Description: Handwritten notes on this old newspaper clipping indicate that it was given by M. J. Graham to A. F. Weaver, and correctly reports that the church structure burned August 25, 1908. The article erroneously states that it burned July 4, 1914. The article appears to have been published in the Mineral Wells Index. The caption reads: "Crowd attends dedication of the wooden church as it nears completion in the summer of 1896, when the edifice was dedicated to the Lord and mankind. On July 4th, 1914, the church was destroyed by one of the most disastrous fires in the history of Mineral Wells, when 34 residences and hotels, for two blocks east and west, and four blocks north--from Hubbard St. to NW 4th Street--burned. Every place from Hubbard north to 4th Street except the Tygrett home. "The present church was constructed some two years after the wooden church burned, on the same site--the corner NW 2nd Street and NW 4th Avenue. Perhaps some of the youngsters in the picture are living in the community today [2013]. Picture made available by M. J. Graham from his file of papers and pictures on the history of Presbyterianism in this community. "Until the present domed brick church was completed, the Presbyterians held Sunday School and church on the lower floor of the Odd Fellow Building in the 200 block on North Oak." The domed brick church mentioned in the article was built in 1909, (at a cost of $15,000, according to the El Paso Morning Times of 1909) and was replaced by a third church at this location in the 1980's due to structural deterioration. Please note: The picture in this article has been slightly cropped from it's original form, which is also in the A. F. Weaver Collection with the title [First ...
Date: unknown

First State Bank & Trust Company

Description: The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown

[The Firstron Building After a Fire]

Description: The Firstron Building occupied the site of the Oxford Hotel (which burned down)and was itself replaced by the First National Bank (which moved away). The building burned in 1983. Lynch Plaza now [2012] occupies the site. The sign in front of the remains of the Firstron Building reads: Firstron Building OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 325-4461 ROOM 300 It invites ironic comment. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition, on page 186.
Date: unknown

Fog

Description: This booklet gives an overview of fog as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Types of fog and factors for formation and dissipation; flight procedures when fog has been forecasted or encountered en route"; and the en-route weather aids available to the aviator." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page.
Date: January 1970
Creator: Turgeon; Sukalski & Maerk, A.

[A Fun Day in Mineral Wells]

Description: Four individuals are shown here, out for a day of fun. From left to right are: Joe Myers, Ida McLendon, Hamp Russell and Elizabeth Crisp. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells," first edition, page 71. The photograph was taken on one of the donkey paths on East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys. He was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife then took over the donkeys, and built a rock house on the trail as a background for souvenir pictures.
Date: unknown

[Games at Elmhurst Park]

Description: A girls' basketball game is being played at Elmhurst Park, around 1910. Ladies in the picture are wearing ladies' basketball uniforms of the day. Ladies at the time played on a half-court, and the game was strictly a no-contact sport. The game was re-started with a jump ball after each score, tie-ball, or any infraction of the rules. There were six players on each "side", three "offense", and three defenders. This picture may be found on page 89 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", Second Edition, by A. F. Weaver.
Date: unknown

[The Gem Theatre Band]

Description: The Woodward Family Band (although the sign on the drum says "Gem Theater Band") is shown standing in front of The Gem Theater,once located at 201 NE1st Avenue in Mineral Wells. The film "The Diamond From the Sky" was playing at the time the photograph was taken [about 1915]. This film starred Lottie Pickford, sister to Mary Pickford.
Date: unknown

The Giant Penny

Description: This photograph appears to have been taken in the Convention Hall. The date is unknown. It shows a display of various items on and around a stage. The title 'The Giant Penny' appears to be taken from an advertisement of Texas Power & Light that was popular in the middle decades of the twentieth century. The advertisement extols the amount of electricity that even one single cent will buy. The occasion that prompted this display might only be conjectured. Conjectures, however, are not only tiresome, but likely to be wrong, too. Therefore, none will be rehearsed here.
Date: unknown

Gibson Well Park and Pavilion

Description: Young ladies frolic at the Gibson Well Park around 1900. Two young women are swinging jump-ropes Double-Dutch style for a third lady. The dress styles indicate this group represents a social club on a spring outing. Note the distinctive architectural style of the Gibson mineral water pavilion. The First Christian Church now occupies the site of the early Gibson Park.
Date: unknown

[The Ground-breaking for the Peck City Railroad Depot]

Description: This picture illustrates a newspaper article (in the Mineral Wells "Index")about the ground-breaking ceremony for the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad depot in Mineral wells, Texas. The G & B V railroad ran from a junction on the Texas & Pacific Railroad main line at Peck City (2 miles west of Millsap) to Mineral Wells. The G&B V depot was on SE Mesquite Street, (now SE 1st Avenue) one block north of the WMW&NW depot. The G&B V contracted to use the WMW&NW tracks from Mineral Wells to the Rock Creek coal mines in far western Parker County, four miles east of Mineral wells. The G&B V ceased operation shortly after the Texas & Pacific Railroad bought the WMW&NW in 1902.
Date: unknown

Hal Collins

Description: The name "Hal Collins", manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's, is printed on the back of this photograph, as well as his autograph on the face. He was convinced that by advertising on the new medium, radio, that he could sell a boxcar-load of Crazy Water Crystals each week. As a result, the "Crazy Gang" began broadcasting from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel over the Texas Quality Network. The noon broadcast became so popular that the sponsor was shipping, not one but several, carloads of Crazy Water Crystals per week to a nationwide audience of devoted listeners. Weatherford's Mary Martin got her start in show business on the program where she became known as "Crazy Mary."
Date: unknown

[Headshot of man against dark background]

Description: Signed head-shot of a man wearing a suit and light-colored tie, with half of his face slightly shadowed. The backdrop behind him is dark. The man's signature indicates his first name was David, and also reads, "To the army helicopter school with my best wishes. Long may you wave!" On the back of the photograph are handwritten notes and a stamp giving the Boyce-Ditto Public Library's address.
Date: unknown

[The Hexagon Hotel and Convention Hall]

Description: A hexagon-shaped hotel was designed and built by David G. Galbraith, and located in Mineral Wells in the 700 block of N. Oak Street. Construction was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. The hotel was the first electrically-lighted hotel in the city, and the hexagon shape was designed to achieve maximum air circulation 61 years before air-conditioning became available. Mr. Galbraith was also the inventor of the paper clip (not the familiar one, but one very much like it. He was issued a patent in 1910); and along with five other men, he was the inventor of the synthetic fiber acetate. The hotel was demolished in 1959. The Convention Hall building at 715 N. Oak Street, located next door to the Hexagon Hotel, was built in 1925 on the site of Mineral Well's first electrical generating plant (DC). The Convention Hall was torn down by the city in 1977.
Date: unknown