Boyce Ditto Public Library - 475 Matching Results

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Crazy Sign Across The 100 Block of Hubbard Street

Description: This picture shows a post-card of the sign. It also represents the original version of the picture of the Crazy Sign. A colorized version, by A. F. Weaver, may be found under the title [Crazy Sign]. It was constructed in 1933 over East Hubbard Street, (later to become part of the Bankhead Highway--later still, US Highway 180) in the center of Mineral Wells. It was quite a landmark as it was one of only two signs allowed by by the Texas Department of Transportation to span a highway maintained by the state agency. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The choice of Christmas Eve was made, it was declared, because there would be a minimum of traffic on that day. The sign was later salvaged for scrap. . Information about the sign was taken, for the most part, from A.F. Weaver's "Time Was..." on page 30.
Date: 1933?

The Crazy Theatre

Description: The Crazy Theater was located at 400 North Oak Avenue, on the east side of the street opposite the Crazy Hotel. The sign reads: "Week Commencing Monday June 22." The street does not appear to be paved, which dates the picture prior to 1914. Bennett's Office Supply now [2013] occupies the site of the former theater. The theater features in A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 17.
Date: 1914?

The Crazy Theatre

Description: Shown here is a picture of the Crazy Theater, 400 N. Oak Avenue (the present [2014]location of Bennett's Office Supply)that was taken between 1907 and 1914. The trolley tracks, which were installed in 1907, are visible on Oak Avenue. The city streets were paved in 1914, some time after this photograph was made. The building is located on the east side of the north end of the 400 block of Oak Street, and the Crazy drinking Pavilion was located on opposite (west) side of the same block.
Date: unknown

[The Crazy Theatre--With a Car]

Description: This photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's Book, "Time Was...", 2nd edition, on page 17. It is captioned "Crazy Theater, 400 North Oak Avenue, photo around 1918."
Date: 1918?

Crazy Water

Description: Shown here is a label for Crazy Water, characterizing is as a "Natural, Saline, Alkaline Mineral Water--a Mild Laxative and Diuretic." The label continues with directions concerning the proper dosage. A cautious note suggests that the prospective drinker consult with a physician in cases of doubt of the required amount of water to take.
Date: unknown

Crazy Water and Crystals Display

Description: As the caption reads, a display of Crazy Water and Crazy Crystals in the front entrance of the plant that manufactured them is illustrated here.
Date: unknown

Crazy Water Bottling and Crazy Crystals Plant 1940

Description: This picture shows the facade of the Crazy Crystals Plant as it was in 1940. The water tower announces the place as the "Home of Crazy Water." The building now [2009] houses a box-making enterprise.
Date: unknown

[The Crazy Water Bottling Company]

Description: A note on back of this photograph states, "Crazy Fiz, 1930's." It apparently shows a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Company, where carbonation of the mineral water converted it to a "Crazy Fiz", a product similar to the popular carbonated soft drinks of the day. It was also bottled and packaged for shipment here.
Date: 1930/1939

[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]

Description: Men are shown here loading boxes of Crazy Crystals onto railroad boxcars. Crazy Water Crystals were shipped nationwide in response to demand created by radio advertising. This scene is typical of the activity required to load boxcars to meet the demand for "instant Mineral Water." Printed on back of the photograph is: "Loading Crazy Crystals 1930."
Date: 1930

[The Crazy Water Crystal Factory]

Description: Shown here is an interior view of the Crazy Crystals Plant. "Crazy Water" was evaporated, and the dissolved solids precipitated as crystals which were then packaged and shipped all over the United States, Canada, England and Australia. By dissolving the Crazy Water crystals in water, the purchaser was able to reconstitute "mineral water" and secure the benefits of one of the earliest "instant" beverages without the added cost of the supplying company's shipping water.
Date: 1940?


Description: This photo shows an easterly view of the "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant, the Water Tower, and Crazy Water train cars on the train track adjacent to the Plant. Mineral Wells, Texas
Date: unknown

Crazy Water Hotel

Description: Shown here is the front entrance of the Crazy Water Hotel, in the 100 block of NW 3rd Street. This entrance is into the hotel lobby with the front desk to the left. The "Crazy Water Crystals" radio show originated from the hotel lobby immediately to patron's right upon entering the hotel. A salesman convinced the hotel's owners, Carr and Hal Collins, that if they would advertise crazy water crystals over that "new-fangled" media, radio, that they could sell a boxcar-load of crystals a week. Carr sent his brother, Hal to Texas Quality Network (KTQN) to start a program that would make the crystals popular. By 1937, the Collins brothers were making about three million dollars by selling a boxcar-load of crystals each DAY! The idea of crystallizing the minerals in the water is probably not original, here. It is said that a person named Dunkle, who worked in the Piedmont Hotel, collected portions of mineral water that patrons of the hotel had not used , and warmed the water to put his aching feet in. One day, Dunkle was surprised to find that the water had evaporated, and the minerals had been left behind. He carefully collected the mineral residue, and sold it to Piedmont patrons at two dollars a bottle. Persons interested in more details are referred to Guy Fowler's book, "Crazy Water."
Date: unknown

[A Crazy Water "Oxidine" Bottle Label]

Description: A bottle label for Oxidine (apparently a medication for malaria), manufactured by the Crazy Water Company, with directions for use, is illustrated here.
Date: unknown

[The Crazy Water Well--1974]

Description: What is said to be the original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is supposed to be the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "Cured" her dementia. Stories are in conflict about how many women there were--and whether the water actually cured any of them of epilepsy. Subsequent analysis of the water refuted a rumor that there was any Lithium was in it. Cutter's "Guide to Mineral Wells" (first published in 1893, re-printed in 2007) suggests that the first well was "[N]ear the center of one of the business blocks of the city, back of the hardware store of L. B . Kidwell. It is now out of use and, we learned, to be filled up." Although not used for years, this well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974."
Date: March 24, 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Crazy Well]

Description: The first Crazy drinking pavilion was a small wooden building (in the center foreground of the picture) built over the well that supplied the water. The large two-story wooden structure in the picture was opened on April 14, 1900. This picture, however, was taken in 1908. The wooden pavilion was torn down around 1909, and replaced by a brick structure, commonly called "Crazy Flats", with rooms to rent. The building on the right of the picture (which would be across the street to the west of the Crazy Well) was the Carlsbad drinking pavilion. The tracks in the foreground of the picture were for the Mineral Wells Electric Railway trolley (1907-1913) that ran north-south on Oak Avenue. A second rail system, the Lakewood Park Scenic Railway ("Dinky Cars"), ran parallel to the trolley in this neighborhood but one block west, between the Crazy and Carlsbad pavilions. This picture is from A. F. Weaver, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", First Edition, page 10.
Date: 1908?

Crazy Well at Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: Shown here is the Crazy Well drinking pavilion, as it appeared around 1908, looking at the North and East (back) sides, after remodeling and the removal of a residence. The house was removed still stands at 715 NW 1st Avenue. The photograph was taken across Oak Avenue. Note the top of the first Texas Carlsbad Well in the background.
Date: 1908

[The Crazy Well Bath House]

Description: This photograph was used in A. F. Weaver's 1st edition of "Time Was..." on page 16. His description: "This street scene taken in 1918 showing a drug store on the corner, the bath house next door and then the Crazy Flats north of the bath house. The Crazy Hotel sits just to the West of the drug store. The fire of 1925 March 15th started in the drug store and burned the whole block." (The first Crazy Hotel is not visible in this picture.) Please note the Hexagon Hotel in the distance on the left side of the street. The building across the street with the tower at the right edge of the picture is the Vichy Well and Natatorium (an impressive word for "Swimming Pool"), later The Beach, and then The Standard Well.
Date: unknown

[The Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion]

Description: This is a picture of the second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion. The original Crazy Well and first Drinking Pavilion are housed in the small building in the middle of the picture immediately in front of the larger second Pavilion. This picture of the wooden structure was taken shortly after its construction in 1900. Notice the dirt roads, and the burros tied at the hitching rail. Burro rides on trails around town, especially up East Mountain, were a very popular form of recreation in Mineral Wells' early years. Customers are seen entering the upper floor by an exterior flight of stairs.
Date: unknown

Crazy Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: This is a picture of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion, the first such facility in the city. When a Mr. Wiggins dug the third well in town, it was frequented by a "crazy woman" who was eventually cured of her dementia. Because of the word-of-mouth publicity, people came from miles around to drink the health-giving water. A house was built around the well for the convenience of the customers. The highly successful business attracted competition, and one of the most popular health spas in the nation grew from these beginnings.
Date: 1885

Crazy Well Park

Description: "CRAZY WELL PARK, located just south of the Crazy Hotel at the corner of NW 3rd Street and 1st Avenue" as the picture that appears on page 115 of "Time Was...", Second edition, declares. The building one block west (left) of the first Crazy Hotel (at the northwest corner of NW 2nd Avenue and NW 3rd. Street) is the W.E. Mayes Building in which the Wells Hotel was located. (The far right end of the building also carries a sign reading "Caldwell Hotel." (Early in its life, the site of this building was the Texas Carlsbad well and drinking pavilion.) Also visible is Clark's Pharmacy. The prominent park is now part of the Crazy Hotel parking lot.
Date: unknown

The Crazy Well Water Company

Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. Recto describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Date: 1920?

[Crystal Plant]

Date: 1930

The Cullen Grimes School

Description: Principal Donald Bond, the teachers and the students of the afternoon group at Cullen Grimes School in Mineral Wells, Texas congregate in front of the building in March of 1954.
Date: March 1954
Creator: Daniel, W.L.

[The Cumberland Presbyterian Church]

Description: Shown here is a picture of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. On the back of picture is written "901 N.Oak [.] Sold to Church of Christ [.] Demolished and rebuilt." The streetcar tracks, which ran from 1907 to 1913 are visible on N. Oak in front of the church. The denomination takes its name from Cumberland Street, Philadelphia. A sub-sect of Presbyterianism--based on an Arminian interpretation of Calvinism--was begun at the church there. A Cumberland Presbyterian church is advertised as being in Newberry at the present [2014] time. The picture was taken before North Oak Avenue was paved in 1914. The Church of Christ still [2008] occupies this location on N. Oak Avenue.
Date: 1907/1913?