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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
The Last Days of Camp Wolters, 15 August 1946
This pamphlet describes the last eight months of Camp Wolters, during which time it was closed down, and its personnel were transferred to positions in other places.
Facts about the U. S. Army Replacement Center, Mineral Wells, Texas
This item appears to be about the size of a bookmark. It contains a list of facts and statistics about the facilities and personnel at Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas.
[Firing and Deflection Conversion Tables]
This document (FT 81 B3, abridged) consists of two pages, each with a separate table. The first table is a chart that shows range and elevation for firing particular mortar shells. The second page includes a chart with range and deflection (presumably for the same kind of shells), as well as notes which give additional instructions.
Camp Wolters, Infantry Replacement Training Center, Mineral Wells, Texas
This booklet gives an overview of the camp at Fort Wolters including the facilities, activities, and general rules. It also includes sketched maps of the camp.
The United States Army Welcomes You to its Newest Aviation Training Center, 13 July 1956
This pamphlet was a program for the activities surrounding the formal reconstitution of Camp Wolters as an Army installation. It includes a greeting from Colonel John L. Inskeep, a brief history of Camp Wolters, a list of the day's events, and two sketched maps of the camp and parade grounds.
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying.
Unit History of 845th Engineer Aviation Battalion [ From] 1 January 1956 to 29 February 1956
This document gives a narrative of the activities of the 845th Engineer Aviation Battalion, as they prepared to leave one station (England Air Force Base, Louisiana) for their new headquarters at Wolters Air Force Base in Texas. There is a description of their drills, inspections, and preparations as well as an appendix with the original movement orders. The motto beneath the shield translates: "We build a nest."
A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters: A picture book of the camp and its activities
According to the introduction, "Here is your Camp Wolters, a photo-record of faces and places to hold for you the memory of your first days in Our Army at this infantry replacement training center." The booklet includes photographs and a commentary regarding different sorts of training and exercise, meal times, recreational activities, and camp buildings.
Central Christian Church
No Description Available.
[The Presbyterian Church: First Building]
No Description Available.
The Original Baptist Church Building at SW 4th Avenue
No Description Available.
The Oaks
No Description Available.
[The Star House]
No Description Available.
The Fairfield Hotel
No Description Available.
[An Unknown Boarding House]
No Description Available.
The Thatch
No Description Available.
A Label of Mineral Water
No Description Available.
Howard's Hardware Store 1903
No Description Available.
Mineral Wells Hardware
The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...."
[First National Bank]
No Description Available.
[ A Crazy Hotel Pamphlet]
No Description Available.
[An Early View of Mesquite Street]
No Description Available.
Howard-&-White Dry-Goods Department
No Description Available.
[The Interior of The First National Bank]
No Description Available.
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall: Interior, 3 of 5]
No Description Available.
The Final page of the Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee, 1975
No Description Available.
The Convention Hall and Its Surroundings
This picture shows the quondam Convention Hall in it glory days after its erection in 1925, and before its demolition in 1976. A house in the (possibly)the Colonial Revival style is visible. Another large house on a hill appears to be in the Neoclassical style.
Hubbard Street: About 1925
No Description Available.
Crazy Water and Crystals Display
As the caption reads, a display of Crazy Water and Crazy Crystals in the front entrance of the plant that manufactured them is illustrated here.
[The Building of Camp Wolters]
An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000."
Crazy Well at Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is the Crazy Well drinking pavilion, as it appeared around 1908, looking at the North and East (back) sides, after remodeling and the removal of a residence. The house was removed still stands at 715 NW 1st Avenue. The photograph was taken across Oak Avenue. Note the top of the first Texas Carlsbad Well in the background.
Crazy Water Bottling and Crazy Crystals Plant 1940
No Description Available.
[Ellis White Shows Off the Book About Mineral Wells]
No Description Available.
Inside a Howard Department Store
No Description Available.
[A Crazy Hotel Brochure]
This photograph illustrates a fold-out brochure of the Crazy Hotel with various scenic views of things to see and do around the city, along with different modes of transportation to and from Mineral Wells.
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]
The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of SE Sixth Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown.
[A Crazy Water "Oxidine" Bottle Label]
A bottle label for Oxidine (apparently a medication for malaria), manufactured by the Crazy Water Company, with directions for use, is illustrated here.
Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky
No Description Available.
The Crazy Well Water Company
This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. The recto folio describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Crazy Water
No Description Available.
Sanitarium
The Mineral Wells Sanitarium was located at 315 NW 1st Avenue. , It was listed in 1907 as being leased by Doctors J.M. Massie, and R. G. Beaswell. It was later owned and operated by B.H. Milling before he built the Milling Sanitarium. The building was torn down and replaced by Willimann's Pharmacy. Currently [2010] the Woodsmen of the World club resides at this location.
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater.
Mineral Wells Sanitorium
An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
[Three Old-Time Stores]
This picture appears to show three stores that stand cheek-by-jowl. A saddlery on the far left shares space with a furniture store--and an undertaker's establishment on the far right. The sign over the stores combines their functions in a way that would--under other circumstances--seem comical. The building itself was located at the corner of SE 1st, and South Oak Streets. A note on the photograph states that it was south of the MARTIN BUILDING. It was once the McBrayer-Armstrong Grocery, then later the Nash Hardware store. The location of Lattner eventually became the Buy-Rite store [116 South Oak Avenue, at the corner of SE 1st Street, until some time in the early 1980's]. The road is unpaved, there is no evidence of lighting--except for the lamp mounted on a post at the front of the building. The horse-drawn hearse (without its horse or plumes) suggests that although it was in front of the stores, it was not at the time in use. The picture, therefore, dates from the end of the 19th century--or the earliest 20th century.
[A View of the Baker Hotel]
Shown here is yet another view of the Baker Hotel in its days of glory.
[Yet Another View of Mineral Wells]
No Description Available.
[The Water Tower]
No Description Available.
[Another View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows several different styles of house prominent in Mineral Wells, ranging from Colonial Revival (center) Queen Anne (upper tier, right), to Classical Revival (Upper tier, center). The Convention Hall is barely visible in the lower left corner, so the picture clearly antedates its demolition.
[A View of Mineral Wells]
A set of buildings is shown here. The only buildings that have been identified with confidence are the Crazy Water Hotel, and the Nazareth Hospital, both at the right. The Baker occupies a small position on the extreme right.
[The Convention Hall and its Surroundings]
Shown here is the back side of the convention hall. The picture antedates its demolition. The surrounding buildings have not yet [2014] been identified.