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ABOUT BROWSE FEED

[Another View of Mineral Wells]

Description: This picture shows several different styles of house prominent in Mineral Wells, ranging from Colonial Revival (center) Queen Anne (upper tier, right), to Classical Revival (Upper tier, center). The Convention Hall is barely visible in the lower left corner, so the picture clearly antedates its demolition.
Date: unknown

Crazy Well at Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: Shown here is the Crazy Well drinking pavilion, as it appeared around 1908, looking at the North and East (back) sides, after remodeling and the removal of a residence. The house was removed still stands at 715 NW 1st Avenue. The photograph was taken across Oak Avenue. Note the top of the first Texas Carlsbad Well in the background.
Date: 1908

[The Building of Camp Wolters]

Description: An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000."
Date: 1940

The Carlisle House, Mineral Wells Texas

Description: The Carlisle House was once located at 316 NW 3rd Avenue, and NW 4th Street. It filled a quarter of the block, and, with sixty rooms, was one of the largest hotels in Mineral Wells. It owned and managed by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Emmett Carlisle. Mr. Carlisle died in 1911, but his widow continued to manage the hotel. The hotel met its doom in a fire that consumed six hotels and seven dwellings during its rampage. The conflagration was so thorough that the location was still empty in 1921. The Nazareth Hospital as eventually built in this location. The architecture is possibly best described as an eclectic mix of Queen Anne and Prairie styles, the latter perhaps reflecting additions to the original building. [For further details, please see the picture labeled "Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas."]
Date: unknown

[The Foster House]

Description: This picture depicts a hotel--done in Queen Anne style (Spindle-work sub-type). Please note the unusual two-story wraparound porch, also with spindle-work. It appears to have been excerpted from a fragment of advertising copy that gives the name of the building as "The Foster", and extols the owner (Mr. T[homas] J[efferson] Foster) as "...an old hotel hand of large acquaintance and wide experience, who has studied the wants and needs of his guests[,] and loses no opportunity of making them comfortable." Another picture (this from the June 5, 1903 "Daily Index") remarks that the hotel was opened in 1902, and that it is "[L]ocated just right to catch the trade--right among the wells and bath houses--as int invalid desires invariably desires to be centrally located as possible." Rates are given at $2 per day, and $12 per week. A barely-legible colophon, appearing to read "FONE" appears in the lower left-hand corner.
Date: 1910?

The Carlsbad of America

Description: Shown here is the battered title page of a pamphlet about Mineral Wells, calling it "The Carlsbad of America." It gives the property valuation (ending in 1905), and the population of the city (also ending in 1905). A colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet remarks "Texas An Empire---A nation within a Nation." The pamphlet reports itself as the work of the Index Printing Company.
Date: unknown

The Brain Busters

Description: The modern viewer is likely to be appalled by this picture, but black-face comedy was considered a socially acceptable form of entertainment until after World War II. The pamphlet suggests that "The Brain Busters" were a series of difficult questions sent in to the duo by listeners to their radio program. "February" has been identified as Francis Quinn (one of the players in the band of Jack Amlung), and "Sugar Cane" was said to be Amlung's announcer, Conrad Brady.
Date: unknown