Boyce Ditto Public Library - 403 Matching Results

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[The Wells Hotel]

Description: This is a picture of the Wells Hotel, in the W. E. Mayes Building, once located on the northwest corner of Northwest 1st Avenue and Northwest 3rd Street. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was", Second Edition. Please note the complete lack of automobiles in the picture. Although it is not apparent from the photograph, the street is not likely to have been paved. The picture was most likely taken in the early years of the twentieth century.
Date: unknown

[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974.
Date: December 5, 1973

[The Foster Hotel]

Description: A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. The 1907 Polk's directory lists it at (202 West Moore" (202 NW 6th Street ), two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. The proprietress is given as "Mrs. Sallie Cock." It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work sub-type, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the west side of the hotel's block. The Foster House (as it was called) was built just before 1902. Mrs. Sallie Cock was born in 1861 in Fayette, Texas. She married Robert H. Lett in 1886. She married Dr. Lewis Cock in 1898. She had three children by him. She died in Blanco, Texas in 1950.
Date: 1900?

[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]

Description: The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

[The Star House]

Description: The Star House was built about 1900, and owned by Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Ramsey. This 34-room hotel, situated at 315 Coke Street,(since re-named NW 2nd Street), was one of Mineral Wells' early hotels. The Star House also operated the Star Well, located 2 blocks east of the hotel on Mesquite Street (now NE 2nd Avenue), north of the current Baker Hotel. The Star House was destroyed by fire.
Date: unknown

[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: December 5, 1973

[Photograph of Inspiration Point]

Description: Photograph of a scenic overlook on a mountain. Two notes on back of the picture read "So. of city on 281", and "Lake M W." This picture appears to be taken just east of Inspiration point, instead, and looking southwest, where the highway starts down the mountain.
Date: unknown

[A Panoramic View of Mineral Wells]

Description: The southern half of a two-part panoramic view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, taken about 1910 occupies this photograph. In this view, the Crazy Flats drinking pavilion is seen at the upper left;First Methodist Church near the skyline to the right of the Crazy Flats; and the First Presbyterian Church (domed building) at the upper far right of the picture. The houses shown are predominantly in the Queen Anne style--a popular one at the time of the photograph. This picture occurs on page 133 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", first edition, 1975.
Date: unknown

[An Early Parade on N. Oak Avenue]

Description: A parade on North Oak Avenue around the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The Hexagon Hotel (at the right center of the picture) was built in 1897,which makes a terminus a quo for the picture. A street car ran down the middle of the street from 1907 to 1913 (no tracks are visible here). Please observe the condition of the street. It was not paved until 1914. The Vichy Well drinking pavilion (later known as the Standard Well) is visible on the right skyline. This pavilion was torn down for the USO at the beginning of World War II. The large two-story building at the left middle of the picture was the Carlsbad Hotel.
Date: unknown

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall (built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant) for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977.
Date: 1897/1959

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The Caldwell family ran the Hexagon Hotel as a boarding house for a while, hence the sign on the second floor of the building. H. L. Milling and his father also ran the hotel for a while, too. The building visible behind the hotel is the DC generating plant that supplied electricity to illuminate the building.
Date: 1897/1924

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip (not the familiar one, but another one very much like it) , and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber. According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-Square Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897. The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for light and fans (for a fee) in every room in the hotel. It also contained a steam laundry and an ice house on the first floor. The second floor was given over to a dining room for the hotel guests.
Date: 1897/1924

[The J.S. Murphy Home]

Description: The J.S. Murphy home, located on East Mountain (facing West), overlooks the city. The house was built by Murphy in 1905, and remodeled into a full two-story home in 1915. Mr Murphy was a partner of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors, who built many of the homes and buildings of Mineral Wells, including the Old High School. The picture appears on pages 114 and 140 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", 2004, Mini Edition.
Date: unknown

[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]

Description: A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well.
Date: October 1, 1977
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]

Description: Trees in full foliage (the photograph was taken in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on Northwest 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was originally built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2009] owned by David Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators.
Date: July 1975

[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]

Description: The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port) that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974.
Date: June 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue

Description: The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front.
Date: June 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.