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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
[A Rock Outcrop on Mineral Wells "Mountain"]
A rock outcrop, and vegetation typical of the hills (local custom calls them "Mountains") in Mineral Wells. Some of the houses of the town can be seen through the bushes. This photograph is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" were also on the envelope.
[Photograph of Lake Mineral Wells]
Photograph of a view from a spot near the dam looking across the lake to Ed Dismuke's Famous Water Company, where mineral water was piped to his drinking pavilion on NW 3rd Street.
[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]
A view from South Mountain, toward East Mountain, before the Baker Hotel was built in the 1929 is shown here. The Old Post Office building, built in 1912, is in the upper left quadrant. This picture is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
[A View of Mineral Wells From South Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells, looking north from South Mountain, taken after 1929, is pictured here. The front of the old Mineral Wells High School is visible in the lower left corner. The Crazy Hotel is just to the right of center. This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
[A Lady Viewing Mineral Wells From East Mountain]
A lady is shown viewing city of Mineral Wells while standing on a rock formation. She is on East Mountain, looking southwest. A popular activity for tourists was to climb the mountain and view the city. The picture appears to have been taken about 1920. This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope, some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
[Barber Lake]
Many property owners in early Mineral Wells had their own water wells, but the city pumped water to a small standpipe on East Mountain for distribution to the city. When the wells became insufficient to supply the city's needs, Barber Lake was built in the Barber Addition--in the northeast part of town--as Mineral Wells' first city water supply lake. Around 1905, Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke built a dam across Pollard Creek west of the city to form Lake Pinto, the city's next water supply. Barber Lake, the City's first municipal water supply, can still be found southeast of Cullen Grimes School (built in 1920 at 1800 NE 1st. Avenue as Barber School, the name was changed to Cullen Grimes in honor of a long-time principal when it was enlarged in 1942.)
Mineral Wells (1900)
This article and photograph from the Weaver Collection appeared in the Mineral Wells Index in the late 1960's--or possibly the early 1970's. The newspaper attributes the photograph to the "Courtesy of Tom Green," and the research to "Bill Cameron." The article states: "This is the way Mineral Wells looked at the turn of the [twentieth] Century. The Scott Livery Stable, foreground, is occupies the area the Whatley Motor Company does today. Across the street at left was the two-story Holmes Hotel. The barn in the corner, in the center of picture, was the T.J. Green Transfer Company. Mat Birdwell, who purchased horses for the government, had his headquarters in the Green barn. Other spots include the Frost Lumber Yard, next to the Green barn; [the] old Baptist Church steeples, top left; [the] Presbyterian Church, top right, that burned 60 years ago."
[An Aerial View of Downtown Mineral Wells in 1954]
This is a picture of an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells (taken from the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, January 1954)at about South Oak Avenue, and looking north-northeast. Some of the buildings identifiable in the picture no longer exist. The Damron Hotel, at the middle left of the picture, burned in 1975. The Oxford Hotel/First National Bank building, one block east [right] of the Damron, near the center of the picture, burned in 1983. It has been replaced by Lynch Plaza. The Hexagon Hotel, in the upper left corner of the picture, (north and above the Crazy) was demolished in 1959. The Convention Center behind the Hexagon was demolished in 1976. Landmarks still standing are: The 13-story (including a Roof Garden) Baker Hotel, dominating the upper right of the picture; The Crazy Hotel (now [2003] a retirement home) at the upper left of the picture; and the old Post Office in the upper middle of the picture (between the Baker and Crazy Hotels), which now [2003] houses the Woman's Club. The building across the street and to the south (this side of the Baker) was demolished to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, which in turn was replaced by The First State Bank.
Mineral Wells Yesterday And Today
The caption to this picture indicates that there are two of them, taken from a common vantage point. This photograph dates from June, 1895, and it was taken from under the original Welcome sign. The view is to the southwest. The Methodist Church (the large white church with steeple) is in the foreground near the lower left corner. Above it, and slightly to its right (near the left edge and middle foreground), is an old two-story stone building which was occupied by the Bank of Mineral Wells. The second photograph, of Mineral Wells in a later time, is unfortunately not provided.
[Where the "Doodle Bug" Crossed the "Dinky Car" Tracks]
Illustrated here is the intersection of the "Doodle Bug" and "Dinky Car" tracks at the southwest corner of the Gibson Well property, NW 6th Street and NW 2nd Avenue. There were two "Doodle Bug" gasoline-powered motor coaches. The first one ran from Mineral Wells to Graford on the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMWNW) tracks. It was joined later by a second similar coach that ran from Mineral Wells to Seymour on the Gulf Texas and Western (GT&W) line. Two Dinky Cars, gasoline-powered motor cars on the Lakewood Scenic Railway, made round trips each quarter hour from the Mineral Wells depot to Lake Pinto. The Dinky cars, Esther and Suzie, were named after (banker and co-owner) Cicero Smith's daughters. The cars were joined in 1908 by a larger car--the Ben Hur. In the photograph the narrow-gauge dinky tracks running east-west along 6th Street crossing the wider standard-gauge railroad tracks running north-south (left to right in the picture.) The Gibson Well park and drinking pavilion are also shown in the picture.
[The Mineral Wells Annual Fair]
Typewritten on the back of the photograph (probably by A.F. Weaver)is: "We attended the Mineral Wells annual fair at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park." The photograph is probably a copy of an earlier image.
[Photograph of Lake Pinto, Mineral Wells, Texas]
Photograph of a "Dinky Car" by the side of the original Lake Pinto. Two people are in a canoe on the lake.
[A LakeWood Park Scenic Railway, Dinky Car "Esther"]
This photograph shows the "Dinkey Car", Esther, that operated on The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway to Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1907, at which time the lines were removed. The background indicates the picture was taken near Lake Pinto. This "Dinky Car" was one of two named "Esther" and "Susie" after local banker Cicero Smith's daughters. Banker Smith and Ed Dismuke, owner of The Famous Water Company, built the Scenic Railway. These little cars, powered by gasoline engines, ran every 15 minutes from Mineral Wells, around West Mountain, to Lake Pinto. A larger version, called the "Ben Hur", was added in 1907. Round trip cost 15 cents, and the cars ran on their own steel rails from 1905 to 1909. The Scenic Railway operation to Lake Pinto differed significantly from the trolley and tracks of the Mineral Wells Electric System. The trolley company served the City and ran some two miles southwest to Elmhurst Park and Lake between 1906 and 1907.
Crazy Well Park
"CRAZY WELL PARK, located just south of the Crazy Hotel at the corner of NW 3rd Street and 1st Avenue" as the picture that appears on page 115 of "Time Was...", Second edition, declares. The building one block west (left) of the first Crazy Hotel (at the northwest corner of NW 2nd Avenue and NW 3rd. Street) is the W.E. Mayes Building in which the Wells Hotel was located. (The far right end of the building also carries a sign reading "Caldwell Hotel." (Early in its life, the site of this building was the Texas Carlsbad well and drinking pavilion.) Also visible is Clark's Pharmacy. The prominent park is now part of the Crazy Hotel parking lot.
The Dam and Pinto Lake
This picture appears on page 81 of the Second Edition of "Time Was..." The book states that the lake today [2008] is dry, and owned by C. R. Upham, Jr.
[The Lookout Tower of the Casino at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph appears on page 87 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. He writes, "The Casino had two lookout towers. Note the five persons in the tower." The people are not identified. The photograph appears to have been retouched for sharpness and contrast.
Casino
This photograph may be found on page 87 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. He identifies it as "The Casino and Fiddler's Bandstand at Elmhurst Park." The park was southwest of Mineral Wells. Some of the photograph appears to have been re-touched.
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park , 1of 3]
The Casino, facing the lake at Elmhurst Park. For further details, please consult the other pictures in the series.
[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park]
Games at Elmhurst Park in 1910 included women's basketball. The players here are wearing the typical basketball uniforms of "genteel ladies" of the day. Girls and ladies played on half of a normal basketball court with both teams shooting at the same basket. The game was restarted with a "jump ball" after each goal or foul (read: "Rule infraction").
[A Cabin on the East Mountain Stairs]
Shown here is a photographer's cabin about halfway up East Mountain. A staircase of (reportedly) 1,000 stairs ascend the "Mountain" from Oak Avenue. A cabin was built about halfway up these stairs (visible in the lower right corner of the picture) to provide tourists with photographic souvenir opportunities. This photograph comes from the Knights of Pythias 1925 album.
[People in the Front of the Nazareth Hospital]
A group of people, including a priest, three nuns and Mother Superior, standing in front of the Nazareth Hospital. For details about the Nazareth Hospital, please see: "Nazareth Hospital, 25th Anniversary, 1931-1956."
[Looking North on Oak Avenue]
A photograph, looking north on Oak Street between 1914 and 1916. Work has started on paving the street. This picture is to be found on page 16 of the second edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..."
[Mesquite Street]
A picture of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue) looking south is illustrated in this picture. The drug store in the picture is the C. F. Yeager Drugstore on the SE corner of Mesquite Street and NE 1st Street. A bank is also visible at the next corner up from the Yeager Drug which is the SE corner of Mesquite and Hubbard Streets. There are people in the middle of the Street, and several horse drawn vehicles, indicating a parade or demonstration of some sort. Since most of the crowd are ladies in period dress at about the turn of the twentieth century, it could be a demonstration for Womens' Suffrage or the Ladies Temperance League demonstrating in favor of prohibition--no signs or placards are apparent.
[The Auction of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, First Edition]
Shown here are the successful bidders for the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," first edition, 1975. Identified in the picture are Reverend Mister Bobby Moore (front row left) who was the auctioneer; Mr. Jack Dickens (next to Rev. Mr. Moore); and Mrs. Jack Dickens (behind her husband), who bought book number one; Frost Bowman (barely visible behind Mrs. Jack Dickens) bought the fourth book; Bill Bennett (back row fourth from right) bought book number three; A.F. Weaver (back row second from right) is the author of the book. (H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, former mayor of Mineral Wells, [not shown], bought copy No. 2
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the auction of the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1975. Identified (facing the crowd in front row) are Mrs. Richard Warren (with arms folded); Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; A.F. (Art) Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore, Auctioneer. The auction took place inside the restored "Little Rock School", Mineral Wells' first public school.
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.)
[A Scene at auction of First Edition of TIME WAS]
Attendants at an auction of the First Edition of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" shown here, are, left to right: Mrs. Richard Warren;, Mrs. Morris Thompkins; Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; Mr. A.F. Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore; Auctioneer.
[The TIME WAS Book Auction]
The auction of first edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." The men in picture were: (left to right) the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Art Weaver, author; H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, Mayor of Mineral Wells; and Frost Bowman, Banker. The Reverend Mr. Moore was pastor of the First Baptist Church at the time. Mr. Weaver was a photographer, and the first president of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Dr. Zappe was a dentist, and Mr. Bowman was a Director of Mineral Wells Heritage Association.
Stamps & Phillipt [sic] Demonstrating Their Automobile
Stamps and Phillips, inventors, demonstrating their Storm Alarm invention. Note that "Phillips" is spelled with one "l" and a "t" on the hand-written caption. The car is sitting in front of the second Carlsbad drinking pavilion on W. Watts Street (now NW 4th Street.) The photograph was taken during the 1920's.
First State Bank & Trust Company
The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
[The Crazy Well]
This picture was taken in 1974, looking south on NW 1st Avenue from NW 4th Street, showing the metal cover, in the sidewalk corner, of the Crazy Well. It is full of Crazy water, ready to be pumped out and used. The building on the left is the west side of the present [2008] Crazy Water Retirement Hotel. This information was taken from Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", page 29. This well was the third one dug in Mineral Wells.
[A Gazebo in West Park]
A gazebo, built during the 1970-1980's era, is visible through the trees in West City Park. The park is located on US highway 180 (Hubbard Street) where Pollard Creek crosses it--west of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas.
[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]
The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II.
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office
Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
[The Crazy Hotel, East Side]
This photograph was taken in front of the Weaver Photography Studio (412 North Oak)in 1974, and looking west across Oak Street to the Crazy Hotel. The east-side entrance to hotel is clearly visible. The picture was taken before the widening of US Highway 281 through town in year 2005. The automobile at the curb was Mr. Weaver's. The entrance to Crazy drinking water pavilion is on the far right of picture, through a hooded door, under a tile-covered shed roof. It is visible above the hood of the automobile in the foreground. The lobby entrance is beyond the pickup truck, under the "Crazy Hotel" sign. Steps that lead to Mr. Weaver's photography studio are on the front left of the picture. The curved effect of the picture comes from the wide-angle, short focal-length lens that Mr. Weaver used to obtain the photograph.
[People Sitting in a car]
This photograph, looking west on East Hubbard at the corner of NE lst Avenue, shows a touring car, with two men in front and three women behind. Please note the trolley car tracks in front of the car. They are almost covered with dirt and no longer in use. This photograph, taken about 1915, may be found on page 137 of Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells."
[The Yeager Building]
Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed.
First National Bank
The first National Bank, at the southeast corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983.
[The Crazy Well Bath House]
This photograph was used in A. F. Weaver's 1st edition of "Time Was..." on page 16. His description: "This street scene taken in 1918 showing a drug store on the corner, the bath house next door and then the Crazy Flats north of the bath house. The Crazy Hotel sits just to the West of the drug store. The fire of 1925 March 15th started in the drug store and burned the whole block." (The first Crazy Hotel is not visible in this picture.) Please note the Hexagon Hotel in the distance on the left side of the street. The building across the street with the tower at the right edge of the picture is the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later The Beach, and then The Standard Well.
[An Early Street Scene in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the corner of Mesquite and Coke Streets (Now [2008] NE 1st Avenue and NE 2nd Street) The picture was taken in 1912 after the Ben Hur motor car had stopped running (note its tracks). The Whatley Motor Company is now located where the Livery Stable was on the left at the time of the picture. The "Old Post Office" replaced the buildings on the right, and the Chautauqua was the large white building a block further up the street at the center. Information about this photograph was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", on page 82. The former Coke Street is labeled "Moore Street" (which was actually four blocks further north). The picture dates to 1905 when the "Dinky" car operation began and the Chautauqua was constructed.
[The Crazy Hotel Barber Shop]
Photograph of the barber Shop in the Crazy Hotel, including a long row of mirrors and waiting area on the far right, and stations for cutting hair on the left. In the center of the image, "Shoe Shine Boy" Leon Cross is seated next to a shoe-shine stand and an unidentified man is seated near him in a barber chair.
[Two women in a Wheelbarrow]
Two unknown young ladies are shown posing in a wheelbarrow in Wylie Park, located in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street (for the same photograph, please see page 115 of "Time Was", second edition). Wylie Park seems to have been a project of the local ladies' garden Club, who developed various empty areas around town into garden plots. The first Catholic church on the side of West Mountain appears to be barely visible in the far distance, indicating that the photograph has been taken looking to the west. The photograph unfortunately bears no date.
[The Yeager Building]
A stone building named "Yeager Block" on the corner of NE 1st Avenue and NE 1st Street is shown here. (NE 1st is the street shown in the picture. Dr. Yeager lived two blocks east--up that street--of the drugstore). Once home of (what was known to some as)"The Lion Drugstore", it had a metal statue of a lion mounted on its roof. The statue of the lion was removed but not the exact date of its removal is not sure. It is not visible in a photo dated 1925 of the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. At the time of this photograph, (a handwritten note on the back of the photograph gives the date as 1993), it was housing the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route."
Grande Courts Tourist Apts.
A tourist court, built about 1930 by Charlie E. Turner, Harold Dennis, and Clarence Hunt is depicted here. It was located in the 1000 block of West Hubbard Street. Grande [pronounced "Grand-dee"--at least in Mineral Wells] Courts was a national chain of franchise motels. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 99. The sign reads "Grande Courts Tourist Apts."
[NE 1st Avenue]
This photograph shows a scene of NE 1st Avenue. The stone building on the left is the "Yeager Building", which once housed the "Lion" Drugstore. At the time of the photograph, it housed Baker Medical Supply. A handwritten date on the back of the photograph states "1993." In 2007, the coffee shop "H2Jo" is located in this building. The next building up the street (and in the next block) was once the Hub Tailors, and the large three-story building farther up the street is the Western Auto Store. At the end of the street is the Old Post Office, which currently [2008] houses the Women's Club.
[The Crazy Theatre--With a Car]
This photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's Book, "Time Was...", 2nd edition, on page 17. It is captioned "Crazy Theater, 400 North Oak Avenue, photo around 1918."
[A Street Scene: Highways 281 and 180]
A picture, looking north on US Highway 281 from NW 1st Street to its intersection with US highway 180 (Hubbard Street). The first building on the right is Lynch Plaza, the location of the discovery of the mineral water well that gave Mineral Wells its name and made it the leading health spa in the state. Other businesses are: Cole's Florist on the west (left) corner of the block opposite Lynch Plaza, Poston's Dry goods (the low building in middle of block north of Cole's), First State Bank on the corner north of Lynch Plaza. The Crazy Hotel can be seen in the distance; three blocks up the street on the left. Oak Street was widened, with turn lanes, in 2005.
[The Yeager Block]
This picture shows a white sandstone building on NE 1st Avenue named "Yeager Block." The original home of (what was often called) the Lion Drugstore, it once sported a metal statue of a lion mounted on the roof, which gave rise to the legend that the business was called "The Lion Drug." (Current living descendants of Dr. Yeager do not ever remember the drugstore being referred to by than name. However, a casual reference to it in 1912 refers to the store as "The Lion Drug.") It housed the Baker Medical Supply at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back of the photograph gives the year as "1993." The coffee shop "H2J0" is located [in 2007] where "The Rural Route" used to be.
Texas & Pacific [Bus]
This is a photograph of the bus that conveyed passengers that got off the Texas & Pacific's "Sunshine Special" in Millsap to their destination in Mineral Werlls. This picture was taken in 1940. Information about this picture is taken from Arthur Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", page 96.
[Looking South on Mesquite Street]
A photograph that looks south on Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue)is shown here. It was taken after 1914, as the pavement indicates. Several automobiles and a horse-drawn buggy share the street. Note the water fountain between cars in right-center foreground. This water fountain was later moved to Mineral Wells' West City Park, and is now in the "Towne Common", located in the 100 block of SW 1st Avenue. The picture may be found on page 79 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS . . . " Mini Edition, 2004.