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[Lovers Retreat]
Lovers' Retreat has been called one of the most scenic spots in Texas. This popular picnic spot, located on Eagle Creek north of US Highway 180 (four miles west of Palo Pinto, and south of the creek) was used for many years for camp meetings, and the annual Palo Pinto Old Settlers Reunion. This photograph shows some of the huge boulders in the area north of Eagle Creek, which were accessible from the picnic area by a suspension foot-bridge that spanned a popular swimming and fishing hole. This spectacular recreation area is currently [2007] on private property, and no longer accessible to the public.
[Downtown Park]
This photograph shows one of several city parks maintained by the ladies of Mineral Wells. Some pictures identify one or the other of these parks as "Wylie Park." It may be that the separate parks on vacant lots throughout the town were all part of a civic "Wylie Park" program. The Cannas here are quite tall. Brick work edging of the flower beds kept the grass from invading the garden.
[The Palo Pinto County Courthouse]
This picture illustrates Palo Pinto County's third Courthouse, completed in 1941 by the WPA. The rock retaining wall was constructed out of materials taken from the second (1884) courthouse. A World War II Memorial stands in the foreground of the picture, and a granite marker at the far right commemorates the county's 1957 Centennial. Native pecan, elm and oak trees surround the county seat. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
[A Brazos River Scene]
This 1925 photograph shows individuals, in clothing of the period, at the Brazos River. It appears to be a holiday outing. Some of the people sitting and standing are in full dress, and not wearing swim suits. The flat and sandy shore is reminiscent of the Village Bend area of the Brazos River in the vicinity of Oaks Crossing (the early Brazos ford on the main road from Palo Pinto to Weatherford) some 6 miles southeast of Palo Pinto. The opposite shoreline in the photograph is rocky, with heavy vegetation and high banks. The photograph comes from a Knights of Pythias Album.
[Hell's Gate]
An old channel of the Brazos River cut a gap in a sandstone formation in the Possum Kingdom area. Water from the impounded Possum Kingdom Lake covered the area and created this spectacular scene when the Morris Shepard Dam was built by the W.P.A. for flood control in the late 1930's. For a feel of the magnitude of the vista, please note the two-story home atop the cliff to the right of the photograph.
Sewerage Disposal Plant
Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper.
[Blind Nellie]
Blind Nellie was brought to Mineral Wells by a cowboy, who sold her at auction for a dollar and a half. She eventually came into the possession of Colonel W.R. Austin, who used her to turn the wheel of the pump at the Austin Well. The horse became a tourist attraction in that capacity. When she was retired, she continued to walk in circles in her pasture. She was given a ceremonial burial when she died in 1912, a burial attended by a large crowd of admirers. The story may be found on page 54 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." by A.F. Weaver. Written on the back of this photograph is "Blind Nellie at Austin Well located in the 900 block of N.E. 2nd Ave." This is clearly a photograph of a newspaper clipping.
[A Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]
A bottle-shaped flier is illustrated here, showing the attractions and services in Mineral Wells. Evidently, this is the interior of the flier. See "Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad" for the cover. All hotels, boarding houses, wells, and activities are listed, including fox hunting. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Ad].
[A Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]
The interior of a bottle-shaped advertisement for mineral water is shown here. It claims romantic properties for the water. See also [Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad] and [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions].
[A Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Advertisement]
A picture of a mineral water advertisement, probably the cover of a flier is shown here. This is an example of the exaggerated claims made about mineral water. It advertises an "Unscientific mixture of water, bottled in bond in Mineral Wells by Pleasant Memory, and marketed as 'Donkaione.' " For the (probable) interior of the flier see [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement].
Texas Carlsbad Water
A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph.
Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas
The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue (west of the Crazy Water Well and Drinking Pavilion), is shown here. A more modern brick building was added to this wooden pavilion in 1909; both structures are visible in pictures taken during a Woodmen of the World convention in 1911. (Note: The newer Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning when the second Carlsbad Pavilion shut down operations during World War II.)
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 7: Heliports, Stagefields, Directory
This volume consists of photographs and diagrams of stage fields such as Sundance, Mustang, Rawhide, Da Nang, Phu Loi, Soc Trang, and many others. The U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School utilized approximately 1,350 square miles of airspace.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 6: Civilian Personnel
This volume consists of photographs of civilian employees at Fort Wolters, with a few of their biographies.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 5: Military Personnel: Awards, Promotions, Retirements
This volume consists of photographs of personnel receiving awards, promotions, and retirements.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 4: Army Primary Helicopter School, Officer Graduation Class
This volume includes a document that was the first official written notice designating Wolters as a Fort, dated June 4, 1963. It also includes biographies, and photographs of graduating pilot classes.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 3: Primary Helicopter Center Facility
This volume includes a list of abbreviations, a list of Fort Wolters buildings and facilities (with square footage and cost of construction), a detailed history of Fort Wolters; and information on recreational activities, such as the Fort Wolter's Boots & Saddle Club, the Bowling Alley, and Skeet Range.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 2: Primary Helicopter Center Personnel
This volume includes a list of U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School Commandants from 1961-1973, with biographies and photographs of some personnel.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 1: Infantry Replacement Training Center
This volume includes a time-line of events that took place in Fort Wolters from 1921 to 1973, including biographies of personnel, photographs, diagrams and a Roster of Infantry Replacement Center Officers from 1941.
[Dust-proof, Round Windows of Motor Chair Car]
Shown here is an interior view of a motor car, called by the locals the "Doodle Bug", showing the port-hole windows that were characteristic of all motor-cars built by William McKeen. They were claimed to be dust-proof. Two of these 70-foot, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, 81-passenger motor cars made a round trip daily from Graford, Texas, through Mineral Wells to Dallas from June 11,1912 to April 23, 1929. They were joined March 27, 1913 by a similar coach on the Gulf Texas & Western (GT&W) line that ran from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro to Salesville where it traveled over the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells,& Northwestern) rails through Mineral Wells and on to Dallas. Motor-car service was re-established (suggesting that it must have been been abated) between Fort Worth and Mineral Wells on June 6, 1913, at the order of the Texas Railroad Commission. The Weatherford "Daily Herald" reported that a steam train would replace the motor-cars on April 22, 1913, "...on account of the very crowded condition of the motor car...[which] has occasioned so much discomfort and dissatisfaction on the part of the travelling public." Since the motor-cars were reported to be still running in 1929, one may draw one's own conclusion. This picture is on page 93 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", First Edition, 1975.
Famous Well
This picture is taken from a series of 17 (4X4) negatives that were enclosed in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma: 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. The photographs were taken January 11, 1919. Also written on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the following: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." The rock building housing the original well was located on Lake Pinto, across West Mountain from the City of Mineral Wells. Mineral water was piped to the Famous drinking pavilion. The Famous Water Company is still [2007] in operation at 215 NW 6th Street, vending "crazy" mineral water, deep-well water, and drinking water filtered by reverse-osmosis.
Ten Years Younger
This picture displays the title page of a booklet about Mineral Wells, Texas health resorts, and how they could make people feel ten years younger.
Memories of 1934
A 1934 Yearbook from Mineral Wells High School belonging to Nealia Dillard is shown here.
A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas
A booklet about the history of Mineral Wells, Texas, from 1881 to 1921.
D.W. Griffith Presents "The Birth of a Nation"
This photograph illustrates a souvenir program from the silent motion picture, "The Birth of a Nation, the Most Stupendous and Fascinating Motion Picture Drama Created in the United States. Founded on Thomas Dixon's story 'The Clansman' " The motion picture presents an early 20th-century Southern view of Reconstruction.
Mineral Wells, Texas
A pamphlet about the various services and attractions in and around Mineral Wells, Texas, with many photographic illustrations, extols the allurements of Mineral in an effusive nineteenth-century prose, that was probably archaic for the time of the pamphlet.
Hotel Guide, Highway Guide, and Where to Go in Mineral Wells
This guide to the town of Mineral Wells, contains information about the different types of water available, recreation activities, sanatoria, and hotels. A "Dyspeptic" is also shown as a "Before" image. Please observe the gammadion (swastika) ribbons that adorn the top and bottom of the doggerel that touts the benefits of the mineral waters. This guide appears to have been published long before the Nazis of Germany gave the symbol a bad image. The brochure announces proudly that "Registered Nurses [are] in Charge" and that it is "Open to All Ethical Physicians and Surgeons." Among the physicians listed in the Mineral Wells Sanitarium, there is a "L[loyd]. C[ason]. Roberts, M.D.", who was born in Nettleton, Mississippi on October 14, 1868; and who died June 24, 1927 in Mineral Wells. The City Directory lists him as living in 1910 as a Justice of Precinct 8, Hill Texas; he was listed as a widower and a boarder. Later (according to the directory) he was living in Mineral Wells in 1924 with a wife (Bertha Van Everett Taylor--1880-1964) and son (Francis Taylor Roberts--1908-1974) , and he was 56 years old.
Souvenir...Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet about the Mineral Wells, Texas, Volunteer Fire Department,published in 1906.
Visitors Arriving in Our City
The boy shown near the center of the picture is 10-year-old George Calvin Hazelwood, who was a newsboy at the time. The man beside the boy is Louis Farris, who worked for the Hazelwood and C. W. Massie families of Palo Pinto. They are meeting the train to pick up the daily newspapers in 1920. The crowd is typical of the week-end visitors arriving from the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. The Weatherford, Mineral Wells & Northwestern Railway Company reported 190,210 passengers for the year 1920. (This information came from page 92 of Art Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells.")
[A Love Story of Mineral Wells]
This photograph appears to be a fragment of the cover of an advertising booklet that includes the fiction "A Love Story of Mineral Wells", by Mamie Wynn Cox. Her fiction was first published in 1911. Four libraries worldwide claim possession of a copy of it. The complete booklet is available by flipping through the page by selecting "next" above the photographs. The cover shows a lady holding a handful of dominoes, which was probably meant to establish a connection to Mineral Wells, Dominoes once being a popular pastime in the city. The game of 42 (named after the number of points that could be scored in a game) was invented in Garner, seven miles east of Mineral Wells. For readers interested in obtaining a copy of the fiction, the Dewey Number of it is 833; the Library of Congress Call Number is PS 3505.O97
The History of Elmhurst Park Housing Project
Elmhurst Park, on Pollard Creek about one mile-and-a-half of the southwest corner of Oak and Hubbard streets, closed when the trolley from the city to the Park ceased operations in 1913. The City of Mineral Wells received the park property, in a lawsuit concerning the builder of the park, one Major Beardsley (q.v. in the description field). A housing project was opened there about the time the nation began mobilizing for World War II, and construction of Fort Wolters began. (At one time, Fort Wolters was the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation; nearly 500,000 soldiers passed through the Mineral Wells railway depot during the war). The site was returned to the City of Mineral Wells following the war, and made available to veterans and their families. The area is now the site of City Water Treatment and Waste Disposal facilities.
[The Golens Livery Stable]
This picture, labeled on the back as "Golens Livery Stable", shows a wagon, three hacks and a buggy, each pulled by a two-horse team. The hack on the left (the white horse on the right of the team) has a "Green's Transfer" sign on it. The hack in the middle has a passenger and the one on the right has three. The man in the foreground is likely the livery stable's owner. An assistant is visible in the stable doorway. Hacks and buggies were typical of the transportation that Mineral Wells hotels sent to Millsap to meet every passenger train on the Texas & Pacific Railroad, from the time the T&P came through Palo Pinto County in 1882 until the Weatherford, Mineral Wells & Northwestern Railroad began service between Weatherford and Mineral Wells on January 1, 1897.
[The R. B. Preston Building]
Written on back of the photograph is: "R.B. Preston Building[,] Corner of Mesquite & Wall." A 1909 City Directory lists the address of the Preston Building as 110-116 North Mesquite, currently the location of the Baker Hotel, built at this location in 1929. The back of a duplicate picture indicates that the building was the Masonic Building; the 1909 directory lists the Masonic Hall at 113 S. Mesquite--the next block south.
[The Hexagon Hotel], Southside
This photograph is a cleaned-up version, by A.F. Weaver, of the Hexagon Hotel, at approximately the time of its completion. (The site has been cleaned, and the trash removed.) Construction of the Hexagon Hotel started in 1895, and it opened for business in 1897, to ameliorate Mineral Wells' torrid summertime heat years before air-conditioning became available, its design was such that it could catch every vagrant breeze, and cool the hotel. A DC generating plant (seen behind and to the left of the hotel) furnished power to an electric light in each room. It was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. the plant was operational when the hotel opened. There was also a steam laundry and an ice house, as well. The ice house produced its first block of ice in 1903. The builder/owner, Mr. David G. Galbraith (along with five other men) held the patent for acetate. The original photograph, included in the A.F. Weaver collection, shows evidence of construction-related activity and debris along NW Holland Street (now [2007]: NE 6th Street).
Texas Trade Review
An early street scene showing buildings and a horse-drawn wagon. Written in lower left corner is "Texas Trade Review." The sign over the sidewalk reads "D.M. Howard." There were several D.M. Howard stores (see page 122 in "Time Was...", second edition). This scene was probably on Mesquite Street in the 100 block. It is undated, but the unpaved road, and the horse-drawn wagon, suggest the latter part of the nineteenth century.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture.
[An Early Photograph of Mineral Wells on a Bottle]
This picture illustrates an early Mineral Wells photograph on a bottle-shaped brochure. It was taken from Welcome Mountain, and attached to the bottle. Identifiable in the picture is Poston's Dry Goods building near the bottom middle of the picture,the Catholic church at the top left of the picture, and the rear of Dr. A. W. Thompson's residence in the near middle of the picture.
[A Crowd at a Speech]
A crowd (the picture dates to approximately 1910) appears to be attending the awarding of prizes for an athletic event--probably a track meet, judging by companion photographs. The location of the photograph is at Elmhurst Park, an amusement park in the early 1900's on Pollard Creek about two miles southwest of Mineral Wells.
[Pole Vaulting at Elmhurst Park]
Information on the back of the photograph states: "Games (pole vaulting) at Elmhurst Park two miles southwest of Mineral Wells where [the] sewage treatment plant is now located. Picture taken around 1910."
[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]
This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where Southwest 25th Street and Southwest 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son.
[A North Oak Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
A trolley car, and, presuably, passengers, are shown here at the front of entrance to Elmhurst Park. Elmhurst Park was active in the early years of the twentieth century,its career being ended by about 1940. People leaning against trolley car wear what is now [2008] considered "Vintage" clothing. One set of tracks seems to be overgrown by grass; tufts of grass also appear on the other set of tracks. No explanation has been put forward to clarify this situation.
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park - 2 of 3]
The Casino, facing the lake at Elmhurst Park is shown here. For more details about it, please see the other pictures.
[A Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
Information taken from the back of the photograph reads: "Entrance to Elmhurst Park with trolley car. Picture taken around 1910. Entrance to the park with a swinging bridge over Pollard Creek later taken over and made into the Mineral Wells dump grounds. About 2 miles southwest of Mineral Wells."
[A Discus Throw at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph appears to be of a discus-throwing competition at Elmhurst Park. ("Elmhurst Park" is written on the back of the photograph.) A gentleman on the right, leaning on the fence, appears to be holding a tape measure. Please note the spectators on the roof of the building in the background.
Elmhurst Park
This illustration is numbered "30". It appears to be a picture postcard of the entrance to Elmhurst Park, an amusement park on Pollard Creek, about five miles southwest of Mineral Wells. The park operated from 1907 to 1913, and was a major attraction in "The nation's most popular health spa" at that time.
[Basketball at Elmhurst Park]
A note on the back of the photograph identifies this venue as Elmhurst Park. The park was located on Pollard Creek, some one-and-a-half miles from the southwest corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets; and was owned by The Mineral Wells Electric System, which operated a trolley that ran from downtown to the park. (The street car company went bankrupt in 1913, and both the park and trolley ceased operations that year.) The picture appears to be a tip-off to begin a period of play in a men's basketball game. Both men's and women's basketball games were held at the park when it was in operation (from 1907 to 1913).
[A Crowd at a Race]
A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track.
Three Railroads to Mineral Wells
A pamphlet, containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway is shown here. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices.
The Right Ticket
An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "Pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly described in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..."
[A Railroad Engine]
This picture illustrates engine Number 5 of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad in action. Please observe the unusually small cowcatcher and the lack of a visible whistle atop the steam dome. Further information about it may be found in Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells", second edition, on page 91.