Boyce Ditto Public Library - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

[A Love Story of Mineral Wells]

Description: This photograph appears to be a fragment of the cover of an advertising booklet that includes the fiction "A Love Story of Mineral Wells", by Mamie Wynn Cox. Her fiction was first published in 1911. Four libraries worldwide claim possession of a copy of it. The complete booklet is available by flipping through the page by selecting "next" above the photographs. The cover shows a lady holding a handful of dominoes, which was probably meant to establish a connection to Mineral Wells, Dominoes once being a popular pastime in the city. The game of 42 (named after the number of points that could be scored in a game) was invented in Garner, seven miles east of Mineral Wells. For readers interested in obtaining a copy of the fiction, the Dewey Number of it is 833; the Library of Congress Call Number is PS 3505.O97
Date: 1915?
Item Type: Artwork

The History of Elmhurst Park Housing Project

Description: Elmhurst Park, on Pollard Creek about one mile-and-a-half of the southwest corner of Oak and Hubbard streets, closed when the trolley from the city to the Park ceased operations in 1913. The City of Mineral Wells received the park property, in a lawsuit concerning the builder of the park, one Major Beardsley (q.v. in the description field). A housing project was opened there about the time the nation began mobilizing for World War II, and construction of Fort Wolters began. (At one time, Fort Wolters was the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation; nearly 500,000 soldiers passed through the Mineral Wells railway depot during the war). The site was returned to the City of Mineral Wells following the war, and made available to veterans and their families. The area is now the site of City Water Treatment and Waste Disposal facilities.
Date: 1960?
Item Type: Text

[The Golens Livery Stable]

Description: This picture, labeled on the back as "Golens Livery Stable", shows a wagon, three hacks and a buggy, each pulled by a two-horse team. The hack on the left (the white horse on the right of the team) has a "Green's Transfer" sign on it. The hack in the middle has a passenger and the one on the right has three. The man in the foreground is likely the livery stable's owner. An assistant is visible in the stable doorway. Hacks and buggies were typical of the transportation that Mineral Wells hotels sent to Millsap to meet every passenger train on the Texas & Pacific Railroad, from the time the T&P came through Palo Pinto County in 1882 until the Weatherford, Mineral Wells & Northwestern Railroad began service between Weatherford and Mineral Wells on January 1, 1897.
Date: 1882?/1897?
Item Type: Photograph

[The R. B. Preston Building]

Description: Written on back of the photograph is: "R.B. Preston Building[,] Corner of Mesquite & Wall." A 1909 City Directory lists the address of the Preston Building as 110-116 North Mesquite, currently the location of the Baker Hotel, built at this location in 1929. The back of a duplicate picture indicates that the building was the Masonic Building; the 1909 directory lists the Masonic Hall at 113 S. Mesquite--the next block south.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[The Hexagon Hotel], Southside

Description: This photograph is a cleaned-up version, by A.F. Weaver, of the Hexagon Hotel, at approximately the time of its completion. (The site has been cleaned, and the trash removed.) Construction of the Hexagon Hotel started in 1895, and it opened for business in 1897, to ameliorate Mineral Wells' torrid summertime heat years before air-conditioning became available, its design was such that it could catch every vagrant breeze, and cool the hotel. A DC generating plant (seen behind and to the left of the hotel) furnished power to an electric light in each room. It was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. the plant was operational when the hotel opened. There was also a steam laundry and an ice house, as well. The ice house produced its first block of ice in 1903. The builder/owner, Mr. David G. Galbraith (along with five other men) held the patent for acetate. The original photograph, included in the A.F. Weaver collection, shows evidence of construction-related activity and debris along NW Holland Street (now [2007]: NE 6th Street).
Date: 1897/1959
Item Type: Photograph

Texas Trade Review

Description: An early street scene showing buildings and a horse-drawn wagon. Written in lower left corner is "Texas Trade Review." The sign over the sidewalk reads "D.M. Howard." There were several D.M. Howard stores (see page 122 in "Time Was...", second edition). This scene was probably on Mesquite Street in the 100 block. It is undated, but the unpaved road, and the horse-drawn wagon, suggest the latter part of the nineteenth century.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]

Description: A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture.
Date: 1920?
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Item Type: Photograph

[An Early Photograph of Mineral Wells on a Bottle]

Description: This picture illustrates an early Mineral Wells photograph on a bottle-shaped brochure. It was taken from Welcome Mountain, and attached to the bottle. Identifiable in the picture is Poston's Dry Goods building near the bottom middle of the picture,the Catholic church at the top left of the picture, and the rear of Dr. A. W. Thompson's residence in the near middle of the picture.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[A Crowd at a Speech]

Description: A crowd (the picture dates to approximately 1910) appears to be attending the awarding of prizes for an athletic event--probably a track meet, judging by companion photographs. The location of the photograph is at Elmhurst Park, an amusement park in the early 1900's on Pollard Creek about two miles southwest of Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Pole Vaulting at Elmhurst Park]

Description: Information on the back of the photograph states: "Games (pole vaulting) at Elmhurst Park two miles southwest of Mineral Wells where [the] sewage treatment plant is now located. Picture taken around 1910."
Date: 1910?
Item Type: Photograph

[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

Description: This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where Southwest 25th Street and Southwest 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[A North Oak Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]

Description: A trolley car, and, presuably, passengers, are shown here at the front of entrance to Elmhurst Park. Elmhurst Park was active in the early years of the twentieth century,its career being ended by about 1940. People leaning against trolley car wear what is now [2008] considered "Vintage" clothing. One set of tracks seems to be overgrown by grass; tufts of grass also appear on the other set of tracks. No explanation has been put forward to clarify this situation.
Date: November 27, 2006
Item Type: Photograph

[A Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]

Description: Information taken from the back of the photograph reads: "Entrance to Elmhurst Park with trolley car. Picture taken around 1910. Entrance to the park with a swinging bridge over Pollard Creek later taken over and made into the Mineral Wells dump grounds. About 2 miles southwest of Mineral Wells."
Date: 1910?
Item Type: Photograph

[A Discus Throw at Elmhurst Park]

Description: This photograph appears to be of a discus-throwing competition at Elmhurst Park. ("Elmhurst Park" is written on the back of the photograph.) A gentleman on the right, leaning on the fence, appears to be holding a tape measure. Please note the spectators on the roof of the building in the background.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

Elmhurst Park

Description: This illustration is numbered "30". It appears to be a picture postcard of the entrance to Elmhurst Park, an amusement park on Pollard Creek, about five miles southwest of Mineral Wells. The park operated from 1907 to 1913, and was a major attraction in "The nation's most popular health spa" at that time.
Date: 1907/1913
Item Type: Postcard

[Basketball at Elmhurst Park]

Description: A note on the back of the photograph identifies this venue as Elmhurst Park. The park was located on Pollard Creek, some one-and-a-half miles from the southwest corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets; and was owned by The Mineral Wells Electric System, which operated a trolley that ran from downtown to the park. (The street car company went bankrupt in 1913, and both the park and trolley ceased operations that year.) The picture appears to be a tip-off to begin a period of play in a men's basketball game. Both men's and women's basketball games were held at the park when it was in operation (from 1907 to 1913).
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[A Crowd at a Race]

Description: A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track.
Date: 1910?
Item Type: Photograph

Three Railroads to Mineral Wells

Description: A pamphlet, containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway is shown here. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices.
Date: 1976
Creator: Payne, H. L.
Item Type: Pamphlet

The Right Ticket

Description: An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "Pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly described in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..."
Date: unknown
Item Type: Artwork

[A Railroad Engine]

Description: This picture illustrates engine Number 5 of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad in action. Please observe the unusually small cowcatcher and the lack of a visible whistle atop the steam dome. Further information about it may be found in Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells", second edition, on page 91.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System

Description: A Major J. D. Beardsley (1837-1911)--a Canadian who fought for the Union in the Civil war--built an electric trolley line that ran from North Oak, south to the train depot, west to Pecan Street (NW 4th Avenue), south on Pecan Street, to the ridge in the Lowe Place Addition, west to Pollard Creek, where Mr. Beardsley laid out Elmhurst Park (q.v.). A cross-line on Hubbard street ran east to Elmwood Cemetery. By the end of 1906, Beardsley owned sixteen cars, running on approximately ten miles of tracks. It was reported that an interurban line to run to Millsap, Weatherford, and thence to Fort Worth was planned. In fact, speculation had been made that an interurban trolley system had been Major Beardsley's ambition right from the start. The route for this interurban was laid out by Major Beardsley. A man named Gid R.Turner proposed a rival line. A Weatherford newspaper of 1906 reported that an interurban line from Mineral Wells to Fort Worth was gleefully endorsed. If the interurban was not built from Weatherford, then it was asserted that it would go through Springtown, instead. A person from Mineral Wells had pledged $1,000 of the $50,000 required. Confused reports by 1907 had been made that the two enterprises were being merged, but Major Beardsley denied the report. (In August 1907, Turner was required by Weatherford to tell his intentions. He made no answer.) Neither line was ever built, perhaps due to the Panic of 1907, because by December of 1907, the Beardsley enterprise was declared "Dead.". Portions of the tracks were removed near the water wells dug by Mr. Ed Dismuke (q.v., in the description field.), by a syndicate of Beardsley's creditors, including D. T. Bomar, (who bought the railway and assorted properties at auction for $75,000) and Morgan Jones in ...
Date: 1907?/1913?
Item Type: Photograph

[A Bottle-Shaped Advertisement ]

Description: This photograph shows an advertisement for the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad in the shape of a bottle of mineral water. In 1912, two gasoline-powered motor cars were added to the WMW&NW rolling stock to provide passenger service to Salesville, Oran, and Graford. The Golf Texas & Western Railroad,(GT&W)--sometimes referred to by locals as "Get your Ticket and Walk"--was built from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro and contracted to operate motor coaches over part of WMW&NW north extension in 1912. The GT&W line joined the WMW&NW Railroad some 12 miles north of Mineral Wells. Although the contract for the use of WMW&NW system was signed February 6, 1912, actual operation over the WMW&NW line did not begin until March 27, 1913. The Gulf Texas and Western operated gasoline powered motor coaches, similar to the ones owned by WMW&NW, through Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Ft. Worth and on to Dallas. A round-trip from Seymour to Dallas was made daily by a 70-passenger gasoline-powered motor car. Completion of Morris Sheppard Dam and the impounding of Possum Kingdom Lake necessitated abandonment of the Salesville to Graford line (and consequently the entire GT&W line) by August 15, 1936. The reverse side of this Mineral Water advertisement indicates that the building of the railroad was underwritten by Beetham and Sons.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Artwork

[A Charter for the Interurban Road and Street Car Line]

Description: The Mineral Wells Electric System operated two electric street cars in the city of Mineral Wells from 1907 to 1913; one on Hubbard Streeet from NE 17th Avenue to SW 6th Avenue (later part of the Bankhead Highway), and one on Oak Avenue from NE 17th Street to SE 11th Street, thence Southwest to Elmhurst Park. However, two gasoline-powered 70 passenger (all-passenger--no freight) motor cars were operated by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMW&NW) between Graford, Mineral Wells, Ft. Worth and Dallas from 1912 to 1935. An electric interurban line was apparently the brainchild of a "Major" Beardsley, who had founded the trolley line in Mineral Wells. Although there was great enthusiasm for it (as reported in the 1906 Weatherford paper), the interurban line was never built. The entire project was declared defunct in 1908, with the bankruptcy of "Major" Beardsley, and the sale of his assets. The second part of this notice--the Army-Navy Sanitarium--never received final approval by Congress, either. The source of the notice remains [2017] unknown.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Legal Document