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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 9 of 11: Workers]
Workers are shown helping to demolish the First Baptist Church building in 1967. It was built in 1920. The current building is the third First Baptist Church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details.
[First Presbyterian Church - 12 of 13: Front View]
This is the twelfth picture in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church prior to its demolition. This is a general view of the church from the southwest corner of the building.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
A view of the businesses and residences north of East State Highway 180, looking west toward the Baker Hotel in the background. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the Brazos Mall.
[A Piano Recital, 5 of 10]
This photograph, along with nine others, was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Thelma Doss, a local radio personality and historian, is pictured with the pianist in this photograph. The recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 8 of 15: Royal Society Display Case]
The Royal Society embroidery and tatting thread display case with its owner, Will Poston standing next to it, is shown in the photograph. Poston Dry Goods stood at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in Mineral Wells, Texas.
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 9 of 18: Steps in Front of Church]
A view of the roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, as seen from the south. This view shows some of the rockwork landscaping on the south side of the church, located at 1201 SE 25th Avenue in Mineral Wells
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 18 of 18, Architectural Close Up View of Steeple]
Looking vertically up the gable at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells.
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (1)]
A home, apparently of Neo-classical style, located at 516 NE 3rd Avenue. This home was built in 1909 by J. S. Murphy. It was owned in 1976 by Kenneth and Mary Brewer. This negative was part of a collection of photographs take by A. F. Weaver, and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin."
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (2)]
This concrete-block house, of Queen Anne style, free classic subtype, parapeted gable, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, rancher, at 416 NW 6th Street. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. There are 10 room and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. The Gross family lived there until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. Subsequent owners were the Luther Waddy family, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. Another view of it is in "Time Was...", by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. This negative was part of a collection of photographs taken by A. F. Weaver, and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin."
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (4)]
This picture illustrates the McFall home, three miles west of the city of Mineral Wells. It was opened in 1927 as the Indian Creek Brazos Valley School. It saw use as a community center, and as a polling place from 1946 to 1970. The McFall's purchased it and converted it into a residence. This negative was part of a collection of photos take by A. F. Weaver and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin."
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (5)]
The Cunningham House (502 NW 23rd Street, Mineral Wells, Texas) was built in the 1930's. It is in Italian Renaissance style, and it shows evidence of later remodeling. It later became the home of E.B. Ritchie, Palo Pinto County Judge from 1904 to 1908. Judge Ritchie was the first of four generations (son George M., grandson John P., great grandson Richard P.) of attorneys and civic Leaders in Palo Pinto County. This negative was part of a collection of photographs take by A. F. Weaver and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin."
[Photograph of Mineral Wells, Texas 1881]
Photograph of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken in 1881. (Please observe that the picture carries a copyright by A. F. Weaver.)
The Health Resort Quarterly, 2 of 4: Page 1
The Health Resort Quarterly was published by the Commercial Club, located at 106 East Wall Street (now NE 4th Street). This volume was published October, 1915. Officers were: J.C Pangle, President; Dr. J.H McCracken, Vice President; W.I. Smith, Treasurer and Fred Burman, Secretary. The publication contained words of wisdom, advertisements extolling Mineral Wells, and items of local news.
[A Hill With Power Poles]
This picture was taken from one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were contained in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope are some telephone numbers and a remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) This picture is taken from East Mountain, Mineral Wells, looking east along Northeast 4th Street. The ruins of a foundation of a building seen at the end of the street about half-way up the hill was the Chautauqua, completed in 1905 and demolished about 1912. The lookout tower at the top of the mountain was blown away by a tornado in 1930. There is a sign below the crest of the mountain (It appears to proclaim the "Young Photo Garden", which was located at 309 N. Oak Avenue) approximately in the place where the "Welcome" sign was erected in 1922. The Jaycees (Junior Chamber of Commerce) built a youth center on this site in the 1970's, that is still standing at the present time [2008]. Several unidentified people are also to be seen in the photograph.
[A Lady Viewing Mineral Wells From East Mountain]
A lady is shown viewing city of Mineral Wells while standing on a rock formation. She is on East Mountain, looking southwest. A popular activity for tourists was to climb the mountain and view the city. The picture appears to have been taken about 1920. This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope, some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
[Lake Mineral Wells]
Rock Creek in Parker County was dammed up in 1919 to form Lake Mineral Wells, the third lake built as a water-supply for the popular resort town. This photograph appears to be on the east side of the lake where boat docks were located. The lake has been a popular recreation area from the beginning, and is now part of Mineral Wells State Park.
[Photograph of Lake Mineral Wells]
Photograph of a view from a spot near the dam looking across the lake to Ed Dismuke's Famous Water Company, where mineral water was piped to his drinking pavilion on NW 3rd Street.
[ A Street Scene]
This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope, are some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) The scene is believed to show some of the large homes on the east slope of West Mountain, in the 600 block of NW 6th Street, taken at about the time of their construction. The home in the foreground appears to be the site of the former Episcopal Parsonage (the church adjoins the parsonage to the north (left of the picture).
Street Parade / West Texas C. of C. Convention / Mineral Wells 1925
A parade on North Oak Avenue in Mineral Wells, Texas is the subject of this picture. Businesses partaking of it include Poston Dry Goods, a bath house, the Hexagon Hotel, Palace Drugs, American Cafe, and the Caldwell Hotel. American flags, Texas flags, and various banners are hanging from the buildings. The parade is moving south (while the picture is looking north) on N. Oak Avenue, at its intersection with SE 1st Street It was held during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention of 1925. The photograph bears the colophon of the Basil Clemens Photo Company of Breckenridge, Texas.
[An E-mail Dated 3/9/'99 to A. F. Weaver from Dr. Meyer, of Texas A&M]
An e-mail to A.F. Weaver, concerning Ike Sablosky, written by Greg Meyer of Texas A & M, March 9, 1999. Mr. Weaver apparently had inquired about Mr. Sablosky in connection with a photograph.
Lovers Retreat
A photograph of a group of three men and four women pose in a hollow surrounded by vegetation. This former public park, on Eagle Creek four miles west of Palo Pinto, is known for the huge vine-covered boulders north of the creek, and for a lovely picnic area bordering the creek on the south side. A low dam near the downstream edge of the park formed a favorite early swimming and fishing area. A small pedestrian suspension bridge provided access to the rugged boulder-strewn playground. A large tabernacle provided venue for Sunday Services at one time, and also for the Palo Pinto County Old Settler's Reunions.
[A Letter from Mrs. William Wehunt to A.F. Weaver]--dated to about 2002
The letter shown is from "Mrs. William Wehunt", who was the former Katherine Brookshire, whose father owned a furniture store in Mineral Wells. The bank referred to in the letter is believed to have been the Bank of Mineral Wells, that failed in 1924. It had been Mineral Wells' first bank. The Brookshire family of Mineral Wells is believed to be distantly related to the founder of the chain of Brookshire grocery stores.
Hotel Guide, Highway Guide, and Where to Go in Mineral Wells
This guide to the town of Mineral Wells, contains information about the different types of water available, recreation activities, sanatoria, and hotels. A "Dyspeptic" is also shown as a "Before" image. Please observe the gammadion (swastika) ribbons that adorn the top and bottom of the doggerel that touts the benefits of the mineral waters. This guide appears to have been published long before the Nazis of Germany gave the symbol a bad image. The brochure announces proudly that "Registered Nurses [are] in Charge" and that it is "Open to All Ethical Physicians and Surgeons." Among the physicians listed in the Mineral Wells Sanitarium, there is a "L[loyd]. C[ason]. Roberts, M.D.", who was born in Nettleton, Mississippi on October 14, 1868; and who died June 24, 1927 in Mineral Wells. The City Directory lists him as living in 1910 as a Justice of Precinct 8, Hill Texas; he was listed as a widower and a boarder. Later (according to the directory) he was living in Mineral Wells in 1924 with a wife (Bertha Van Everett Taylor--1880-1964) and son (Francis Taylor Roberts--1908-1974) , and he was 56 years old.
Strange Structure [article]
An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes in detail the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history] for further details.
Three Railroads to Mineral Wells
A pamphlet, containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway is shown here. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices.
[A Letter Concerning Mineral Wells High School 1953 Graduation]
A letter is shown here (dated November 27, 2002) from R. B. Shiflet to Bob Bellamy, concerning the Mineral Wells High School graduating classes of 1953 and 1954. It states that the move to the "new" campus occurred during the Christmas holidays of 1953. The letter also describes classroom conditions during this period. Houston School faculty members are mentioned, as well. They included R. B. Shiflet, Mrs. D. R. (Ferne) Hudson and Mrs. Mildred Burnham.
[Judge J. A. Lynch]
. This picture,of Judge J. A. Lynch (1827-1920), founder of Mineral Wells, Texas, may be found published on page 32 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. It is taken from a painting that is owned by the Lynch family, and executed by Thomas Beauregard. A label at the bottom of the frame cannot be read, but presumably identifies the subject of the painting.
Judge J. A. Lynch
Shown here is a reproduction of a steel engraving of Judge J. A. Lynch, founder of Mineral Wells. The source of the engraving remains unknown. A fragment of copy at the bottom of the picture mentions the "inconvenience of hauling it from the Brazos River." The initials "GSW" are visible to the left of the judge's lapel.
[416 NW 6th Street]
Shown here is a photograph of the front and west side of a multi-story Queen Anne-style, cement-block house located at 416 NW 6th Street in Mineral Wells, Texas. It has many architectural features displaying the sub-type Patterned Masonry, such as the shaped parapets on the tower, and on the gables, as well as the Palladian window on the tower. The rectangular tower is unusual. Although it is not obvious in this photograph, there are more than the normal number of chimneys. The house is said to have a fireplace in each room--each one of which was unique. The fireplaces are said to have been faced with Italian marble. A picture in the "Daily Mineral Index" (that is thought to be contemporary with the house) shows another, frontal view, which also displays a conservatory, not visible in this photograph.
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]
This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable and hipped roof, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141.
[612 NW 6th Street]
This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
This home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first "Elegant" home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
This home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first "Elegant" home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. This house has also been home to the John Moore family and the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of the house was taken in June 1974. Another photograph of the house, without the obscuring of the trees in full leaf, may be seen in the preceding photograph;or on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
[A 1949 Mercury]
Illustrated here is a photograph of a 1949 Mercury that was owned by A.F.Weaver, Jr. when he sold Crazy Water Crystals in the Houston and New Orleans areas. Mr. Weaver's father moved to Mineral Wells in the 1930's to manage the Crazy Water Company's operations. Art, Jr. became a salesman for Crazy Water Crystals following World War II.
[An Aerial View of Cantex and Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells, taken from the east and south of Hubbard Street, April 29, 1967 is shown here. Note the Baker Hotel in the upper right corner of the picture. The Cantex Manufacturing Company is in foreground. Once a part of Texas-Vit (vitreous clay products), it is now producing PVC plastic products. The railroad right-of-way shows as a dark corridor to the right and above Cantex in the picture. The street at the far right of the picture is East Hubbard Street, and one block left of it is SE 1st Street (together forming U. S. Highway 180, providing one-way traffic, both west and east, through downtown Mineral Wells.)
[An Aerial View of Early Mineral Wells]
Two very early panoramic views of Mineral Wells are shown here, one of them, the UPPER PICTURE, being the north-west Business District of the city looking southwest. Note the horse-drawn transportation in the streets, and Poston's Dry Goods store in the upper middle. In the LOWER PICTURE looking northwest, a livery stable shows in the lower left corner; the Hawthorn Water Pavilion (with spire) is shown in the left middle above and right of the livery stable barn; the Crazy Drinking Pavilion is the large two-story building at upper middle of lower photograph; and the Hexagon Hotel is near the skyline at the upper right.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
Illustrated here is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east looking west. The Parkwood apartments and the brick factory are in the background. The Sands Motel is in the bottom part of the picture, and East Hubbard Street (Highway US 180) is in the far lower left corner of the picture. The large vacant area was later developed, with Lakewell House Retirement Home built near the middle of it.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-southeast looking northwest. The Baker Hotel is the dominant building in the middle left of the picture. The Crazy Hotel is seen two blocks north (right) and one block west of the Baker. Immediately in front of the Baker is the hotel swimming pool (the second hotel to have its own pool). To the right (north) of the pool is the First Methodist Church.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, looking northwest. Identified buildings include the Baker Hotel (center), the Hexagon Hotel (right, north of Baker), the Convention Hall (next to and right of the Hexagon), the Box Factory (formerly the Crazy Water Crystal plant, left and west of the Hexagon Hotel), the First Methodist Church (across street right and northeast of Baker), the Baker Parking Garage (across the street, south of and immediately in front of the Hotel in this picture), and the Baker Water Works (extreme right middle, up the slope of East Mountain.)
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]
A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]
This aerial photograph is adjacent to, and south of, the previous photograph. It is taken from South Mountain, looking east-south-east. The Chautauqua is on the upper left of the picture. The Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (which burned March 15, 1925) is below and to the right of the Chautauqua. The area in foreground is a residential area of west Mineral Wells, Texas.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells was taken April 29, 1967 from the East looking slightly West. Please note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the back of Brazos Mall.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East 1967]
This photograph is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast. It was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace apartments across the street from it at the upper left edge of the picture. The large building at the lower left corner of the picture is the Sands motel. The large vacant area was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells, taken April 29, 1967, from the ENE looking slightly toward the WSW. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast was taken April 29, 1967, near the convergence of E. Hubbard and SE 1st Street(that together comprise US Highway 180-a one-way street through downtown Mineral Wells). Note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments at the upper left of the picture, and the Baker Hotel in the background at the extreme upper right corner of the picture. The buildings in the lower left corner of the picture are motels. The large vacant area in the picture was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from the ENE, was taken April 29, 1967. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments building at the middle-left of the picture. It lies across the street behind the Brazos Mall (off the picture, left of Spanish Trail Apartments).
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from ENE looking WSW, was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments building across the street from it in the upper middle of the picture. ANTENNA PRODUCTS is at the left edge of the picture. CANTEX (PVC products) is above and left of the Brazos Mall. The Mesa Motel and Sands Motel are at the lower left corner. The large Vacant area was latter developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it,
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial View of Mineral Wells looking SW was taken on April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and the Spanish Trace Apartments.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Northwest, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the northwest. Note the Baker Hotel in the middle of the top half of the picture. The Crazy Water Hotel is below the Baker (two blocks in front). The Box Factory is the white many-storied building a few blocks below The Crazy and near the center of the picture. The Nazareth Hospital is a block to the right of The Crazy. The Mineral Wells Box Factory (Formerly the Crazy Water Crystals plant) is about two blocks this side (below) the Crazy Hotel and Convention Hall is a block to its left. The photograph was taken April 29, 1967.