Boyce Ditto Public Library - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

[The East Side of the (Third) First Presbyterian Church Building]

Description: This picture shows the back (east) side of the third First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. It features an arched window, and (presumably) the dedicatory cornerstone. Due to structural damage, this building was torn down in the 1980's, and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church-- the third building at 300 NW 4th Avenue.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Christian Church]

Description: Typed on the back photograph is: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY A.F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVE. MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS DATE JUL 27, 1964. It is a view of the limestone church occupying the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion. Some of the rock used in this church came from owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie.
Date: July 27, 1964
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Christian Church]

Description: On the back of photograph is typed: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY, A. F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVENUE MINERAL WELLS TEXAS DATE JUL 27 1964. The First Christian church occupies the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue (the address on the photograph was A.F. Weaver's home.) Some of the limestone used to build the church was donated by latter-day owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie, where the first meeting of the Northwest Texas Cattle Raisers' Association was held in 1876. Oliver Loving's son, J.C. Loving, wrote a letter to northwest Texas ranchers after the meeting, inviting them to meet the following February in Graham, where the Association was organized. C.C. Slaughter, once the richest man in Texas, owned the Rock Pens at the time of the Stock Raisers' meeting.
Date: July 27, 1964
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church - 1 of 13: Front View]

Description: This photograph is the first in a series of pictures of architectural details that was taken prior to demolition of the Presbyterian church of Mineral Wells. The first church in Mineral Wells built by the Presbyterians in 1883 was located at the southwest corner of what is now the Crazy Hotel block. The early church served both the Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, and was sold to the Baptist congregation. The First Presbyterian Church was built at 300 NW 4th Avenue in 1896, and burned in 1908 This domed structure replaced it. This picture shows the front entrance to the Sanctuary of this second First Presbyterian Church in Mineral Wells, Texas, built in 1909, at this location. This picturesque building survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed the two-by-three city block area surrounding it. The building suffered serious structural deterioration to its foundation, and was replaced in the the 1980's by a more modern structure.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]

Description: This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.)
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church --5 of 13: Front Entrance]

Description: Shown here is the sixth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows a close-up of the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church -7 of 13: Dome Detail]

Description: The seventh in a series of pictures of architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this picture is a close-up of the dome atop the sanctuary.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church -- 9 of 13: South Side]

Description: This photograph is the ninth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church. This picture is a view of the south side of the church, including, at left, the main entrance at southwest corner of building.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[The Front entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church]

Description: This picture of the main entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church at 300 NW 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, shows the unique dome that topped the picturesque structure. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed about six city blocks surrounding it. Foundation structural damage caused the church to be replaced by a more modern structure in the 1980's. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver Collection showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[Hell's Gate]

Description: An old channel of the Brazos River cut a gap in a sandstone formation in the Possum Kingdom area. Water from the impounded Possum Kingdom Lake covered the area and created this spectacular scene when the Morris Shepard Dam was built by the W.P.A. for flood control in the late 1930's. For a feel of the magnitude of the vista, please note the two-story home atop the cliff to the right of the photograph.
Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Description: A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style.
Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Description: This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the succeeding photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock.
Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]

Description: A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well.
Date: October 1, 1977
Creator: A. F. Weaver